Re: FTR

1

What do you have against John Currin?


Posted by: Parenthetical | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 11:37 AM
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Or John Curin?


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 11:56 AM
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Who is John Curin?


Posted by: Parenthetical | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 11:58 AM
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Good question.


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 12:07 PM
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The Tate does not appear to be very good at spelling names.


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 12:08 PM
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Sure, blame the Tate for you lack of knowledge about contemporary artists.


Posted by: Parenthetical | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 12:12 PM
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That would have been better had I written your rather than you.


Posted by: Parenthetical | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 12:12 PM
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I prefer to keep company with the greats of the past.


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 12:15 PM
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Can I ask why you were searching for images of Bea Arthur at work? Because that seems the more interesting questions.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 12:23 PM
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Thanks, Stanley! I didn't know Bea Arthur was in Return of the Jedi.

max
['That was some acting, baby!']


Posted by: max | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 12:30 PM
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Can I ask why you were searching for images of Bea Arthur at work?

Stanley is advising Obama, apparently.


Posted by: Knecht Ruprecht | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 12:32 PM
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Set Google's SafeSearch to "Strict" for use at work.

That will still present you with her boobs but not as the first items. It will also prevent some other surprises possibly injurious to your employment.



Posted by: Biohazard | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 12:41 PM
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Can I ask why you were searching for images of Bea Arthur at work?

This will remain a mystery, but I assure you it was in fact work-related, which is admittedly kinda weird.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 1:11 PM
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If it's work-related, doesn't that make it acceptable as an exception to the usual rule?


Posted by: fake accent | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 2:05 PM
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13: You either have the best job or the worst job ever.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 2:08 PM
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I have a friend whose full-time job for a while was surfing porn sites looking for copyright violations so that her boss could then send cease and desist notices. She said it got numbingly dull quite quickly.


Posted by: snarkout | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 2:27 PM
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16: I had a friend with that job! Well, she surfed all sites looking for any use of "bunny" or "playmate" or "playboy." Or outlines of bunny ears.


Posted by: oudemia | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 2:29 PM
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17 reminds me that at a mainstream retail outlet recently I saw a Playboy bunny bed comforter for sale. Absolutely bizarre.


Posted by: Witt | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 2:59 PM
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Playboy bunnies need comforting just as much as the rest of us.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 4:05 PM
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Currin is just contemptible, but what about Yuskavage?


Posted by: lw | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 4:06 PM
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Completely OT, but worth looking at:

These are some amazing color photos from the late 30s and 40s. It's amazing how much 1940s New Mexico homesteaders look like contemporary hipsters. Amazing scenes of pre-integration South Carolina. And it's also interesting to see a pre-obesity epidemic rural America.


Posted by: Robert Halford | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 4:58 PM
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Currin is just contemptible

Tell me more.


Posted by: Jackmormon | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 5:01 PM
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21: #49, 53, and 54 = steampunk!


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 5:06 PM
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German version of 'guns don't kill people' : "The problem is not drivers who drink, it's alcoholics who drive" (spokesman for the German beer industry on proposed reductions in allowed blood-alcohol levels, quoted in FAZ)


Posted by: teraz kurwa my | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 5:10 PM
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Those are really gorgeous. I love the dresses---and am a bit surprised to see the women picking cotton in bright, cute prints.


Posted by: Jackmormon | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 5:11 PM
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10: srsly? I did not know either, though for some reason I occasionally put myself through the ordeal of her scene in the Star Wars holiday special, surely among the most excruciating scenes therein...


Posted by: Mister Smearcase | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 5:14 PM
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21 #11 HBO's Carnivale was realistic and steampunky


Posted by: teraz kurwa my | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 5:15 PM
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||

On the subject of New Mexico, does anyone know if there's any local context to this row about Billy the Kid? Teo?

|>


Posted by: Minivet | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 5:21 PM
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28: It's odd how the article doesn't mention what the motivation would be for pardoning him.


Posted by: essear | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 5:30 PM
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21/27: no love for 70?


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 5:30 PM
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29: Perhaps the proliferation of zombie movies has the governor concerned of Billy's return. More likely: tourism-boosting stunt. Or they're pulling out the weaksauce to compete with Arizona for Zaniest State.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 5:34 PM
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22:I like Curran
because George Hunter and Ken Hollister ripped him off for the cover of It's a Beautiful Day no 24 on RS 100 best album covers. And maybe Happy Trials too.

I like Curran anyway. Currin seems to be an eclectic dolt.


Posted by: bob mcmanus | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 5:37 PM
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21: Holy moly.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 5:39 PM
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||

I really enjoy how Witt-style ejaculations have been adopted around here: Holy moly! Bah! Holy smokes!

Heh. This is a family blog.

|>


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 5:51 PM
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22:Ok, the standard line is "off a housekeeping magazine around 1900" and many people say Parrish. There is a Parrish that is similar but Parrish would never use those colors and had an idiosyncratic undercoating and glazing technique. So Parrish + Curran?

No! I say Curran.

Heres the Parrish. Peasants don't know Art.

It could have been some hack illustrator ripping off Curran in 1900. I don't see any evidence Curran did mag covers. He was good, almost on a level of Chase and Sargeant .


Posted by: bob mcmanus | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 5:54 PM
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Hey, bob: I bought a hatchet today (to take down some mulberry trees growing into my neighbor's driveway from my side of the line). So just me know when the revolution starts.

(My roommate pointed out a saw would have been better for the task; oops.)


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 5:58 PM
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Sunlit Valley from the Athenaeum

Other Currans

Can there be any question? Parrish is so fucking overrated.

The IaBD cover does abandon most of the interesting impressionism of the Curran originals, opting for a flat cartoon instead. Happy Trails is more impressionist.


Posted by: bob mcmanus | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 6:02 PM
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37, first link: That's a really nice rendering of her feet. Curran isn't 100 percent my cup of tea, but I'll absolutely grant you both that Curran could seriously paint and that Parrish's paintings aren't as good.

Currin, on the other hand, is a mixed bag. I actually do admire some of his work, even though others leave me angry and frustrated. He's still fairly early in his career and will probably move past this silly pornographic phase he's in.


Posted by: Jackmormon | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 6:09 PM
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36:Hatchet is a lot of work. Got a chainsaw and bowsaw for such work, or borrow the neighbor's axe.

Still have no fence on that side. Sigh. We prefer to limit the dogs in summer anyway, the heat and the females bad wheels.

Talkin' 'bout revolution when I show those Curran ladies. Look at their clothes and attitudes. DFH's of their day were the impressionist models.


Posted by: bob mcmanus | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 6:09 PM
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On the subject of New Mexico, does anyone know if there's any local context to this row about Billy the Kid? Teo?

I'm as confused as you. The first I saw of it was an article in the Albuquerque Journal on Thursday about the Garrett family's objections. That article didn't have any more of an explanation than the AP piece. It seems to have something to do with the theory, which I had never heard of before, that Garrett shot someone else instead of Billy, but I don't understand the connection. I guess the idea is to make Garrett the bad guy, but I don't see how that would make Billy the good guy.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 6:11 PM
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Curran is boring.


Posted by: essear | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 6:22 PM
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[Territorial Governor Lew] Wallace had said he'd pardon the Kid for his role in shooting Lincoln County Sheriff William Brady if the young outlaw would testify before a grand jury investigating another murder stemming from the Lincoln County War. The Kid testified, but Wallace never granted the pardon.

Santa Fe New Mexican


Posted by: k-sky | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 6:34 PM
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35: the standard line is "off a housekeeping magazine around 1900" and many people say Parrish. There is a Parrish that is similar but Parrish would never use those colors and had an idiosyncratic undercoating and glazing technique. So Parrish + Curran?

Wow, this really confused me initially. Curran in the first link in 37 looks more like Sargent (sort of), while Parrish, just, what?

But from the second link in 37, there's this, which is recognizably similar to Parrish. (Apologies; I'm familiar with Parrish, not with Curran.)

My housemate, an artist, to whom I've just posed this question (Curran? Parrish? Alike?) said that the first link in 37 immediately reminded him of Parrish, yes.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 6:37 PM
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Posted by: | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 6:45 PM
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It's amazing how much 1940s New Mexico homesteaders look like contemporary hipsters.

It's amazing how much some decades look like others. I was looking at slides my dad took at Expo '67 not long ago and it was striking how contemporary the clothes looked. Not many of them would've looked too out of place on a city street in 2010.

From what I've seen, I don't think much of Currin. He's all shtick and a pointless shtick at that. Maybe I'd change my mind if I saw more.

If anything, Curran looks like a Cassat knock-off to me.


Posted by: Populuxe | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 6:46 PM
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Cassatt, pardon.


Posted by: Populuxe | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 6:48 PM
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Dude, Stanley, mulberries are great.


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 6:53 PM
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But, a mulberry bush isn't very nice to the side of a car.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 7:04 PM
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Sadly, mulberries make a mess, with all their droppings.

A hatchet is wrong for the job, also sadly. Possibly fun to deploy, ineffectually and with frustration, however.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 7:29 PM
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If anything, Curran looks like a Cassat knock-off to me.

Cassatt

Uhm no. Unless all impressionists and post-impressionists look alike to you. Cassatt lived in France, and was very influenced by the French, especially Degas and Renoir. I would mention the theme of mother-and-child, but that is the decadent sentimental period toward the end of her career. Sold very well, of course. Her more interesting work is earlier, and much more varied.

American impressionism became its own school


Posted by: bob mcmanus | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 7:32 PM
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Plus, Cassatt is not boring.


Posted by: essear | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 7:36 PM
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My attempts at growing edible stuff haven't been working well. On parismon's advice (I think that is whose said it), I thinned the pumpkin plants that I have growing in pots. I also fertilized. The peppers plants in the same pot are doing well and the plants look great. The pumpkins have molding leaves and look horrible. There are new green leaves, but even those have this whitish mold on them. And my raspberry bushes and blueberry bush look to be starting pretty slowly. I should have dug a bigger hole, I think. Anyway, when I fertilized them I must have used too much because the leaves are getting that "burned" look on the edges.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 7:39 PM
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I like the new Google Images

There is nothing there that looks anything like 37.1.

Morisot did some full length figures that are closer, if you insist on being pseudo-feminist.


Posted by: bob mcmanus | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 7:43 PM
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50: Unless all impressionists and post-impressionists look alike to you

All apologies to populuxe, who is dear, but yeah, I'm not seeing this either. Curran appears to be of the fanciful, romantic school (which is fine), though I should probably look at more examples, and of course I do not speak the appropriate language for this. I'm not seeing any resemblance to Cassatt.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 7:53 PM
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and am a bit surprised to see the women picking cotton in bright, cute print

My mother, who grew up on a farm during the 1930s, tells of how they used to buy chicken feed in sacks made of cloth that had nice, pretty printed patterns on it. The idea was that farm ladies would then take the old feed sacks and sew dresses out of them.

http://www.livinghistoryfarm.org/farminginthe30s/life_06.html


Posted by: Spike | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 7:56 PM
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21: If you like old photos, try http://www.shorpy.com/

I've been having fun matching some with family associations with their current images in Google's Street View.


Posted by: Biohazard | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 8:00 PM
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Uhm no

Uhm, yes. The Curran linked to in 32.1 looks like a knock-off Cassatt with a little Charles Dana Gibson thrown in. That isn't to say that Curran is bad, necessarily, or that you shouldn't like him, just that, you know, that's what that picture looks like. I like 37.1 a lot, too, but no one would say that there's nothing like it.


Posted by: Populuxe | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 8:01 PM
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Parrish is like Curran on acid.


Posted by: Spike | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 8:11 PM
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58: Yes! Or any number of other people on acid. Why has Parrish been thrown into the mix here, anyway? I see a sort of resemblance between some things Curran has done, and Parrish, but you know, Parrish was anything but impressionistic. So I say. Not knowing what I'm talking about. But still.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 8:24 PM
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Parrish is closer to the pre-Raphaelites than to any Impressionist, I think.


Posted by: essear | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 8:30 PM
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57:Jesus, populuxe

1. Sky
2. Bright country exterior, bright sunlight

3. Figures on hills (extra points.

Find me oh, three Cassatts with the first two.

Gibson did faces for the most part.

Or if you are going to call them "Cassatt knockoffs" give some evidence or reason. White dresses or shifts, for Christ sake? Thousands of painters, that is what they wore.

Totally talking out your ass.


Posted by: bob mcmanus | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 8:33 PM
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59:pars, the original link was to the album cover for the It's a Beautiful Day 1st album, which many people say reminds them of Parrish. 35 contains the likely picture they are thinking of.


Posted by: bob mcmanus | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 8:39 PM
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54 is right; Curran is more like a prosaic knock-off of fanciful romantics like Thomas Dewing and Alma-Tadema. Cassatt is not such a good point of comparison.

no one would say that there's nothing like it.
Comity on this. There were slews of artists doing that sort of thing at the time, they just aren't very well remembered.

On preview, 61 is right; I'd add that Cassatt would never, ever, paint three figures in profile like the Curran in 32.


Posted by: persistently visible | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 8:45 PM
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Count another vote for Happy Trails, but George Hunter's Charlatans isn't bad either.

|| We're having a hell of a time naming our new puppy. Maybe something Algonquin. Napi is already ruled out (and anyway, it's a boy's name). The shelter gave her a Kutenai name, but we're not sure about keeping it. The dog was a stray on the Pikuni nation, but in an area where Anishanabe and Ne hiyawak predominate. |>


Posted by: CharleyCarp | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 8:48 PM
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Spike @61: tells of how they used to buy chicken feed in sacks made of cloth that had nice, pretty printed patterns on it. The idea was that farm ladies would then take the old feed sacks and sew dresses out of them.

My great-grandmother used to make quilts with that cloth.

max
['They're very nice quilts.']


Posted by: max | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 8:49 PM
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62: Ah, thanks. I hadn't been able to figure out where this subthread was coming from originally. I gotta say that the Beautiful Day cover just looks like a cartoon version of the linked picture in 35. Thanks for explaining, though.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 8:50 PM
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||Also ruled out: Katie, Nina, Chloe|>


Posted by: CharleyCarp | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 8:50 PM
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66 -- Are you saying George Hunter drew like Parrish on acid? Because there's a non-trivial chance that LSD was actually involved.


Posted by: CharleyCarp | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 8:53 PM
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Charlatans


Posted by: CharleyCarp | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 8:54 PM
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Why doesn't the Internet give me a downloadable version of the Charlatans' cover of Folsom Prison Blues?


Posted by: CharleyCarp | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 8:58 PM
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prosaic knock-off of fanciful romantics like Thomas Dewing and Alma-Tadema

Not Alma-Tadema;mostly classic (Greek & Roman) interiors again. Okay, I can think of an occasional grouping an a marble ledge.

Here's some Dewing with some outdoor women. "Summer" White Birch" Check out the color values. Dewing was a Tonalist

Godward? again neo-classic but a little closer

Chase and Robinson did some informal women in exteriors. Tarbell. Zorn, mostly nudes.

Edmund Cucuel check em out

Why do I like the Currans?

Bright light, big country, independent relaxed young women (without men) standing or sitting on top of mountains and hills. Think of it as a response to Hudson River School.


Posted by: bob mcmanus | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 9:00 PM
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CCarp, I used to try to give my animals exotic names that referenced something perfect. But then I always end up calling them "Cat", or "Little Girl." Maybe stick with the basics?


Posted by: Megan | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 9:10 PM
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Look, why is the album cover no 24 on the RS top 100?

Pretty simple, cartoonish, romantic, kitsch.

Because of the simple feeling or sentiment it instills.

Independence. Far from the Madding Crowd.

Compare to Christina's World

Curran isn't my favorite, or the best. But if you can find me more lasses in crinoline on mountains, I would welcome them.


Posted by: bob mcmanus | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 9:16 PM
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But if you can find me more lasses in crinoline on mountains, I would welcome them.

That is the best sentence I've seen in a while.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 9:19 PM
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Compare to Christina's World

Good lord, must I?


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 9:20 PM
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73 -- I don't think you can separate it from (a) the music and (b) the whole mystique of the IABD album, that was only available as an import for so long.


Posted by: CharleyCarp | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 9:22 PM
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75:Follow the link, It's a joke.


Posted by: bob mcmanus | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 9:24 PM
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77: I did follow the link! Hence my remark!


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 9:26 PM
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77: I prefer the sentence acontextually.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 9:30 PM
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This thread is making me realize it's been far too long since I've gone to an art museum. I've made a deal with myself that I'll take a day or two off and go to some museums as soon as I finish the paper I'm currently writing, but it keeps getting delayed in epic bouts of procrastination.


Posted by: essear | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 9:39 PM
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You're probably better off going to one of those art sales that they have in hotel conference rooms. If you find something you like, you can just bring it home.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 9:46 PM
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Huh. I guess it isn't crinoline.


Posted by: bob mcmanus | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 9:50 PM
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82: I'm not sure what crinoline is. The sentence just sounded interesting.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 9:52 PM
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83:Wikipedia will explain.

As someone who looks at a lot of art circa 1900, that outdoor wear in the Currans and Cucuels was fricking ubiquitous. But I wouldn't know where to start on what is was or why it was popular. Looks comfortable.


Posted by: bob mcmanus | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 9:59 PM
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I really enjoy how Witt-style ejaculations have been adopted around here: Holy moly! Bah! Holy smokes!

Those pictures linked in 21 are wizard, uh, something-or-other.


Posted by: fake accent | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 10:03 PM
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Wizard perky-jerky.


Posted by: essear | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 10:19 PM
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Some of those Currans in the gallery linked to look better than boring, but not quite good enough to click enough times to see larger versions. They really do look unremarkable; they remind me of the boring "Gilded Age" room at the Smithsonian American Art Musuem. Maybe not in terms of the art itself, but in the effect it has on me.

I went to the Oakland Museum of California yesterday. Much of the art was a lot better than I expected it to be. One of the things I've enjoyed about going there and the Crocker in Sacramento is that the regional focus means that they have paintings in styles that I, as a complete amateur art-viewer, associate with well-known artists/movements and major geographical subjects like cities or certain rural areas, but these paintings were done by people I've mostly never heard of, showing places like Sausalito, or Pt. Richmond, or Tiburon, or the Central Valley, or wherever.


Posted by: fake accent | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 10:27 PM
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Do they still have the Monterey/SF Peninsula Art Noveau exhibit at the Oakland museum? I liked that one, but I can't remember if it was a special show or not.

(Also, I'm feeling ahead of the curve for once, as a friend linked me to the photos in 21 a few days ago. Usually Unfogged is my source for that sort of thing.)


Posted by: Parenthetical | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 10:35 PM
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Also, I can't spell today. Too much working on lectures, Keynote presentations and syllabi.


Posted by: Parenthetical | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 10:36 PM
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88.2: I was trying to figure out where I saw these linked before. Now I realize it was your Facebook page.


Posted by: essear | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 10:41 PM
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90: Woo, independent verification.


Posted by: Parenthetical | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 10:42 PM
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I don't remember anything specifically Art Nouveau, which is too bad, because I like Art Nouveau (or Jugendstil, for you Germanical people). Or at least I like a lot of the Art Nouveau architecture I've seen. There were some paintings of Monterey, but they more Impressionist; I'm guessing it was a special exhibit.


Posted by: fake accent | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 10:47 PM
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The Oakland museum appears to not have put very much in the way of images or floor plans on their website. I wonder how much they rotate the "permanent" collection.


Posted by: fake accent | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 10:53 PM
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88, 92, 93, continued: Or maybe I'm showing my ignorance of art. These people show up prominently in searches for "art nouveau" in relation to the museum; there's a lot of their stuff still up. But to be honest, I didn't spend too much time over in that section.


Posted by: fake accent | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 11:01 PM
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From a quick glance at the links I'd say Curran as anineteenth century painter equals a bunch of second rate Renoir knock-offs with a few Friedrichs thrown in. All with an extra dose of mawkishness. Or a non religious version of those crappy big devotional paintings you can still see in peasant homes in Poland. (No, I don't seem to be a fan.)


Posted by: teraz kurwa my | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 11:03 PM
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So, isn't this Curran actually the basis for the album photo? I have no idea if that site has accurate information - and before this thread I wasn't really aware of either Curran or Parrish - but that's a pretty strong resemblance.


Posted by: fake accent | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 11:14 PM
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42: Sure, but who cares? Billy was a thug who killed a bunch of people, and Wallace was an incompetent governor (and mediocre novelist) who totally mishandled the situation. I see no reason to bother trying to rectify this particular injustice at this point, and according to the news reports I've seen neither does anyone else, really, except possibly Richardson. For him it's probably just a publicity stunt, but there's been so much opposition to the idea that I doubt it'll end up going anywhere.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 11:14 PM
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96:Woot! Thank you.

I would say so. Check out the clouds. Exact match.

Colors are always chancey in reproductions or due to age.

I should zoom in on the back cover to see if a credit is give, but should be more easy and open than that.

I've always wondered if Happy Trails was stolen from a Zane Grey or something.


Posted by: bob mcmanus | Link to this comment | 07-31-10 11:46 PM
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94: Upon further reflection, I think it was a special exhibit. It did feature art by those two, along with others, but what I remember really liking was the furniture, and I don't think that's just out and about in the museum.


Posted by: Parenthetical | Link to this comment | 08- 1-10 12:01 AM
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95:Friedrichs? Frieseke was a name I didn't bring up. Or Hassam. But Friedrichs at least concedes that there might be an idea.

Look, revolution comes from the masses. Though concentrating on 1875-1925 or so, my wallpaper still cycled thru Chagall, Gris, Braque while I was commenting earlier. But it's cheap and easy and comforting to see the revolution in that stuff, and the avant-garde wasn't that relevant anyway. What were the middle class looking at, what were they reading?

My speculation is that those Currans, if they were the cover of the Ladies Home Journal, were more liberating than the Mayakofskys and Popovas, if only because they were more accessible.

To see social changes as they happen, you have to study mass entertainment. Butch Cassidy and Steve McQueen made a bigger difference than Godard and Pasolini.

Any fucking way, I just like big blue sky painters. Those Dutch fuckers. Ruisdael. Cuyp.


Posted by: bob mcmanus | Link to this comment | 08- 1-10 12:09 AM
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But as I said, Friedrichs at least shows a thought.

In Friedrichs and Hudson River, the human figures are usually dwarfed, overwhelmed by nature. Classic Romanticism.

Curran's young ladies are foregrounded, assertive. They dominate the frame. They are bucking the wind or examining and enjoying the landscape. They are where they are on their own terms, for their own purposes. They aren't working or resting, like some Barbizon shepherdess.


Posted by: bob mcmanus | Link to this comment | 08- 1-10 12:20 AM
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OT for genre fans dragon diaries and part the third there's a link to part the second at the bottom of the third installment.


Posted by: teraz kurwa my | Link to this comment | 08- 1-10 1:07 AM
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Church picnics are so much more revolutionary than shepherdesses, because, um, ?


Posted by: mcmc | Link to this comment | 08- 1-10 6:19 AM
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Face it mcmc, you don't even see revolution.


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 08- 1-10 6:57 AM
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103: Cole slaw left in the sun too long can certainly start an upheaval.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 08- 1-10 6:57 AM
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||
There had been some speculation as to what the North Korean soccer team would face on their return home after their poor showing.

The entire squad was forced onto a stage at the People's Palace of Culture and subjected to criticism from Pak Myong-chol, the sports minister, as 400 government officials, students and journalists watched. The players were subjected to a "grand debate" on July 2 because they failed in their "ideological struggle" to succeed in South Africa, Radio Free Asia and South Korean media reported.
Undoubtedly part of the problem was, The broadcast of live games had been banned to avoid national embarrassment, but after the spirited 2-1 defeat to Brazil, state television made the Portugal game [the one they lost 7-0] its first live sports broadcast ever. The coach was expelled from the Party and forced to become a "builder".
|>


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 08- 1-10 7:50 AM
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The coach was expelled from the Party and forced to become a "builder".

See? They've still got a construction industry. Juche: 7, Capitalism: 0.


Posted by: chris y | Link to this comment | 08- 1-10 7:58 AM
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102: Genre writing typing must be cleansed of its Joss Whedon-inspired preciousness. I suggest large, uncontrolled fires.


Posted by: Flippanter | Link to this comment | 08- 1-10 8:10 AM
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104:I see all the dead revolutions at once, dude. They haunt me and want me to give them peace.


Posted by: bob mcmanus | Link to this comment | 08- 1-10 8:11 AM
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73 is funny.


Posted by: k-sky | Link to this comment | 08- 1-10 8:24 AM
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Posted by: | Link to this comment | 08- 1-10 10:27 AM
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Anyone have any thoughts on this recipe?

Sweet potato pie with honey meringue.

My questions:

I don't like anise. Is star anise going to make this taste like anise?

Kind of a fussy pie crust, don't you think?

Honey meringues? Anyone have any insight into that? Think it could work?

Will this win Pie Contest for me?


Posted by: Megan | Link to this comment | 08- 1-10 1:08 PM
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Pie Contest is on Sept 12th, btw, and you are all invited. It isn't too soon to start practicing your pie.


Posted by: Megan | Link to this comment | 08- 1-10 1:14 PM
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||

Dallas ten-day forecast:

Sunny.

106, 107, 104, 102, 104, 104, 102, 101, 98, 98

What amuses us is that they always err by a couple degrees on the high side on the front end and err on the low side on the back end.

This, I presume, gives an immediate pleasant surprise and a distant hope.

|>


Posted by: bob mcmanus | Link to this comment | 08- 1-10 3:56 PM
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Megan, star anise is probably close enough to anise in taste that you'd be annoyed with it. I personally like it a lot and would even consider upping the quantity in that recipe, since you'll be picking it out anyway. That looks like a beautiful--if, as you say, rather fussy--pie.


Posted by: Jackmormon | Link to this comment | 08- 1-10 5:09 PM
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Thanks, Jackmormon.


Posted by: Megan | Link to this comment | 08- 1-10 10:58 PM
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I'm intrigued by that crust recipe. I have a hard time with traditional crusts (though the enriched dough of pate sucre is easier to work with for me) - and that one looks like it would perhaps lend itself more easily to my talents.

Let us know how it turns out, if you make it.


Posted by: Parenthetical | Link to this comment | 08- 1-10 11:21 PM
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I should try it. I am very happy with my current pie crust, and turn suspicious eyes on this creamed butter and sugar variant. But I am openminded, free and easy. I am not a reflexive adherent to CHANGEBAD. I will try this peculiar pie crust that is different.


Posted by: Megan | Link to this comment | 08- 1-10 11:28 PM
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