Re: In the Crunchy

1

There's probably a good, if self-conscious, country song to be written about a fellow who retreats to la Grande Chartreuse with a broken heart.


Posted by: Flippanter | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:19 AM
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I was going to say, Montreux and water but I see that you're being small-minded and prescriptive about it being country.

Off to sulk visit shut-ins.


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:20 AM
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I think the most common brand name drink over the past 60 years might be Jim Beam. It fits easily into lyrics.

As for the opposite, I was waiting for the female equivalent of "bros icing bros" to appear, but nobody came along with frenemiesmojitoingfrenemies.com.


Posted by: Cryptic ned | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:21 AM
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Shirley Temples and Nizhny Novgorod?


Posted by: Minivet | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:24 AM
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A map on the topic.


Posted by: beamish | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:24 AM
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A map on the topic.


Posted by: beamish | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:24 AM
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It's a double post. Don't check both hoping for more than one map.


Posted by: beamish | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:26 AM
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Texas. Whiskey. Breast milk and Atlantis.


Posted by: Turgid Jacobian | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:29 AM
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3.1 -> 5, 6, and 7


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:29 AM
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Interesting punctuation choices.


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:30 AM
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10: I don't know what you're on about, old bean.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:34 AM
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I'm feverish, not drunk.


Posted by: beamish | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:34 AM
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Aha, a good thread to share my earworm of the day.


Posted by: CharleyCarp | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:35 AM
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Truffletini in Helsinki.


Posted by: Bave Dee | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:39 AM
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Better visuals.


Posted by: CharleyCarp | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:39 AM
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Tsipouro in Mumbai.


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:40 AM
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Coffee in a truckstop.


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:43 AM
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Water and a town near the Mexican border.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:45 AM
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I was on a short roadtrip yesterday, and heard this bit of self-delusional tribalism 3 times on the radio.


Posted by: CharleyCarp | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:48 AM
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In a run down old bar
The way most of them are
Up in Nunavut
I ordered Mai Tais
And she looked in my eyes
And said "Sweetheart, we're shut"

CHORUS
Oh come back in the summer, I'll mix you a drink
We're not as provincial as most people think
But you must see it's winter, there's nobody here
They've all gone to Toronto and taken the beer
And you're lucky to find half a bottle of rye
Let alone all the shit that goes in a Mai Tai
Up in Nunavut


Posted by: chris y | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:50 AM
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Only mildly earwormy for me, but enjoyable.


Posted by: Minivet | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:51 AM
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19: Good god, I am glad they don't play that on "my" country station.* I sincerely enjoy this song, against my better judgment.

*I only have a radio in my car and the antenna is broken so I only get a few stations - and, so, when I drive, I listen to country.


Posted by: Parenthetical | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 11:06 AM
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The song "Every Time That It Rains" by Garth Brooks mentions the song "Please Come to Boston," which I don't think started out as a country song, but has certainly been covered by enough country singers.

Also, I think "You're the Reason God Made Oklahoma" is a great name for a song, even if I don't like the song that much.


Posted by: Blume | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 11:21 AM
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23: So rain and Boston?


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 11:26 AM
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Is "The Ballad of Ira Hayes" a country song? It has water and Iwo Jima. But it also has whiskey and Arizona.


Posted by: oudemia | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 11:35 AM
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Martha's Vineyard and a white wine spritzer.


Posted by: Spike | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 12:46 PM
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Heard this twice.


Posted by: CharleyCarp | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 12:53 PM
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||

I don't usually throw in with the Virginia/Virginia Tech rivalry chatter, but I must say: the swell of apoplexy among my Hokie-alum FB friends has been rather amusing this football season.

|>


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 1:20 PM
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Martha's Vineyard and a white wine spritzer.

That's country club music.


Posted by: Mr. Blandings | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 1:20 PM
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19: My God! Self-delusional is right!

"we're the ones that mostly wind up fighting overseas?" Whatever, dude. The actual character described by this song is a highway worker who has one uncle who's absorbed all the family farms, plus a bunch of neighbors' besides, and drives his quarter-million dollar tractor from one 1,000 acre tract to the next in air-conditioned comfort, listening to Rush Limbaugh and convincing himself that he needs to take his fired-twice .357 Magnum revolver into The City (actually, a suburban shopping mall) with him the next time he goes in to buy new Levi's. His neighbors are all office workers who get up at 4:30 in the morning, not to see to the animals, but to prepare for their 75-minute commutes.

The only horseshit that singer's ever dealt with is the stuff coming out of his mouth.


Posted by: Natilo Paennim | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 1:59 PM
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I mean, for chrissakes, I'm more country than that jackass. He's from some lily-white Milwaukee suburb for chrissakes! I was actually born in a real, no-fooling rural area. What a fucking poseur.


Posted by: Natilo Paennim | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 2:03 PM
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Speaking of country songs that mention places, have I linked to this performance by the OCMS covering "Wagon Wheel"?

The recording is terrible, and there's a lot of crowd noise, but the performance is great. I ended up watching it several times until I could follow the music without being distracted by the crowd and it was worth it.


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 2:05 PM
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All the maw and pop stores are gone because they had to pay taxes!The same stores are owned by indians who feed on us like leeches! they play the game and after 5 or so years whenever our dumbass government says that they have to start paying taxes they sell to relatives that in re turn pay no taxes and the same people work for at the same store tax free and americans don't care! it just floors me. In 10 years the indians and china will control it all i just no one cares but me.

Posted by: OPINIONATED YOU TUBE LUNATIC | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 2:07 PM
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OCMS covering "Wagon Wheel"

At some point in 2009 requests for that song seemed to supplant "Play some Skynyrd!" as the cliché song request at shows.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 2:10 PM
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At some point in 2009 requests for that song seemed to supplant "Play some Skynyrd!" as the cliché song request at shows.

It's a catchy song. I don't know whether this means that I'm ahead of or behind the times since I first heard somebody covering it several years ago, but I hadn't realized that it was quite that high profile.

I am still thinking about the question in the original post. It got me searching for the version of Casey Jones in which he says that the only two drinks that he'd never tried were a glass of water and a something of milk. But google is not helping me on that one.


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 2:13 PM
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27: Well see, there you go. The guy who is actually from some shitheel town in Oklahoma is the one who can sing about fantasizing a life of leisure in a tropical paradise, while the guy from Wisconsin has to go all out to show you how down with the gente he is. Like a regular cultural studies textbook, that.


Posted by: Natilo Paennim | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 2:16 PM
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Sometimes the old fashioned method is the best. I couldn't find the version I was looking for, so I called my dad, who knew it immediately and gave me enough of the lyrics to find it online.

Casey said boys before he died / Just two drinks I've never tried / The boys said Casey what can they Be / A glass of water & a cup of tea


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 2:26 PM
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Also, and this is still not quite responsive to the original post, if we're talking about interestingly specific or unusual details in songs I should link to this post.


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 2:29 PM
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Okay the best song I can think of in response to the post is "Desperadoes Under The Eaves" by Warren Zevon. Not that there's antything particularly unusual about the combination of salty margaritas with Los Angeles, but it stands out as a song in which both the drink and the place are key parts of the song.

Of course there's also, "Ba Muoi Ba" about the most popular beer of the Vietnam war.


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 2:42 PM
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the female equivalent of "bros icing bros"

Hoes Stouting Hoes


Posted by: Todd | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 3:41 PM
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39: Aw, not piña coladas and Trader Vic's?


Posted by: oudemia | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 3:42 PM
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40: Odd. So, stouts are supposed to be the uber-man beer that, like, takes away your ladyness?


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 3:54 PM
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39: Aw, not piña coladas and Trader Vic's?

The case could be made.

But my argument is that the pina colada's are more of an incidental detail in that song. Whereas in "Desperadoes Under The Eaves" I feel like the whole song builds towards

And if California slides into the ocean,
Like the mystics and statistics say it will,
I predict this Motel will be standing, until I pay my bill.

I have to say, though, I was very pleased to dig up 39.2

Also, "Copperhead Road" deserves mention in this thread. Again, hardly obscure or comic, but a song about both alcohol and place.


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 4:19 PM
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Having now watched it the video in 43.last is entertainingly overwrought. It is a good song, though.


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 4:21 PM
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Also, possibly, of interest, an article cataloging drinks referenced in Steely Dan songs.

I'm taking this thread to 100 by myself if I have to.


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 4:28 PM
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I'm taking this thread to 100 by myself if I have to.

I can offer an "Odd!" with respect to the Hoes Stouting Hoes thing. Otherwise I got nothing. What is this country music of which you speak?


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 4:32 PM
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re: 42

Heh, ironically stout in the UK was often recommended to pregnant women and old people as a 'tonic'. There was even a particularly old-ladyish stout in Scotland - Sweetheart Stout.

From wiki:

Nourishing" and sweet "milk" stouts became popular in Great Britain in the years following the Second World War, though their popularity declined towards the end of the 20th century - apart from pockets of local interest, such as in Glasgow with Sweetheart Stout, or in Jamaica with Dragon Stout.

I can still picture the little bottles/cans of Sweetheart Stout, although it's probably years since I last saw some.

http://www.cannyscot.com/SweetWeb10point5.jpg


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 4:55 PM
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Not many songs about 'a bottle of cheap rotgut Kansas City wine.' And New Lee Highway Blues is the only song I can think of with Northern Oregon. Or a 'stinking summer trip through Southern Hell.'


Posted by: CharleyCarp | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 5:04 PM
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OT: I made pie with fresh pumpkin. It was better than most pumpkin pies I've had, mostly because of a lightness to the filling. It was almost fluffy, but not really. Now I wonder if I couldn't get the same effect by using the canned stuff and whooping it in the food processor.

Also, it took a whole (bigger than a bowling ball) pumpkin to make a single pie. I was expecting more and now I have an extra can of evaporated milk.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 5:19 PM
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Christian baby blood in a gay bar.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 5:26 PM
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now I have an extra can of evaporated milk

You could add some vapor and have some milk.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 5:29 PM
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Cans of evaporated milk last forever, Moby, so you're probably okay there.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 5:30 PM
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47: Yes, I had heard of stout recommended for nursing mothers. From a medical advice website: Contrary to popular belief, Guinness stout - or any other form of alcohol - has not been proven to stimulate milk production. Although it might with a 9 month delay.


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 5:46 PM
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What is this country music of which you speak?

Yeah, most of the songs that I've referenced aren't exactly country.


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 6:08 PM
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54: I actually meant that I kind of can't stand country music. It's just a thing of mine.

OT: So apparently in order to respond to Craigslist ads you have to have an account? I've rarely even looked at Craigslist, but I just clicked on it by accident, and saw something I wanted to respond to. But I gather you have to establish an account first.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 6:25 PM
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most of the songs that I've referenced aren't exactly country.

Presumably they're a little bit country and little bit rock n' roll.


Posted by: One of Many | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 6:33 PM
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So apparently in order to respond to Craigslist ads you have to have an account?

No, you should just be able to reply to the e-mail address on the ad. You do need an account to post certain kinds of ads.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 6:35 PM
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Warren Zevon is definitely a prime place to look for drinks and exotic place names. Roland the Headless Thomson Gunner found the man who killed him in Mombasa drinking gin.


Posted by: rob helpy-chalk | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 6:40 PM
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57: Hm. Well, there was no email address, just a "Reply to this Post" link, which led to a captcha thing (squiggly letters to transcribe) which I filled out, and then I was returned to the ad itself, with no more "Reply to this Post" link available. I have no idea; maybe I filled out the captcha doohickey incorrectly. I thought perhaps it was because I don't have an account.

It may not be a good idea to become absorbed in Craigslist ads anyway.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 6:53 PM
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I actually meant that I kind of can't stand country music. It's just a thing of mine.

I used to think that, until I discovered I was listening to the wrong _kind_ of country. Although I suppose the stuff I like is more in the 'western' end of things. I'm continually surprised by how much swing/jazz there is in some 1940s and 1950s country/western.

I don't know enough about the history of the music to know if that was an aberrant period, or if more recent country has excised some of the commonalities it has with black music.


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 6:59 PM
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59: Huh. That might be new since I last used CL.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 7:00 PM
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61: The Help pages mention email addresses to reply to as well, so I don't know. Maybe these ads are specifically placed in a more email-anonymous way.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 7:04 PM
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62: What, may I ask, are you looking to buy? Or is it just something to lease, which may explain the effort at anonymity on their part.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 7:07 PM
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I used to think that, until I discovered I was listening to the wrong _kind_ of country.

That's what everybody says, ttaM. I won't carry on about my dislike of country music because I'll offend people. But: if it has some strong blues element in it, okay. If it involves people singing in a twangy accent, not so much.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 7:08 PM
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re: 64

I'm thinking more of the western swing and country boogie end of things, which isn't really twangy much at all.


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 7:11 PM
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58: Fourteen hours later he was down in Adelaide, looking through the want ads sipping Foster's in the shade.


Posted by: snarkout | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 7:18 PM
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58: Fourteen hours later he was down in Adelaide, looking through the want ads sipping Foster's in the shade.


Posted by: snarkout | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 7:18 PM
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re: 64

I'm with you when it comes to contemporary hat-wearing music, though.


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 7:19 PM
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65: I'm trying to think what the western swing and country boogie end of things sounds like. Do I have to?

Sorry, I just really have a thing about country music, even though I realize it's irrational and doesn't apply to all of it.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 7:31 PM
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The radio station in my hometown used to play polka music when it wasn't playing country music. For some reason, they still do this even thought I think the Polish people must have had time to get acculturated by now.

Also, the radio station used to have a kind of radio-Craigslist. You'd call in if you had something to sell. If the host didn't know who you were, he'd take your billing information right over the air. As I recall, the ads topped out at $30, price based on the asking price of what you wanted to sell.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 7:32 PM
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I'm with you, parsimon. Though I will tolerate country music under extreme circumstances where it's absolutely necessary, such as when I wish to enjoy the excellent bourbon cocktails and delectable tacos at this fine joint.


Posted by: Po-Mo Polymath | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 7:34 PM
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Po-Mo!


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 7:35 PM
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Ah, here we go:

For posts in the personals you will see a "Reply to This Post" button. To see the addresses to reply to the post, click on this and fill out the captcha.

That's definitely new since I last looked at CL personals. Sounds like when it takes you back to the page after the captcha the e-mail address at the top should be visible.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 7:36 PM
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Oh, I just reread 60.2, and understand what you mean. I feel so apologetic about all this! It's not unlike declaring that you can't stand opera (or, say, rap), knowing full well that there's no rational way to defend it but to say that it's just a preference.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 7:36 PM
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73.last: Sounds like when it takes you back to the page after the captcha the e-mail address at the top should be visible.

That's what I thought, but I wasn't seeing it, then thought better of the whole thing anyway.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 7:38 PM
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I've had trouble with captcha-viewing lately. But, they always appear if I refresh.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 7:40 PM
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For some reason, they still do this even thought I think the Polish people must have had time to get acculturated by now

Maybe it's actually Norteño nowadays?


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 7:40 PM
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Stanley!

This year's been pretty damn crazy, pushing me into "occasional lurker" status. New job that involves a hell of a lot of travel, plenty of work when I'm in the office, and no cubicles (which makes it a bit harder to pull up unfogged threads)... I miss y'all!

Also, my entry for most unlikely place and drink pairing in country music (or any music): Campari and St. Louis. Oh sure, you'll find St. Louis. You may even find Campari. But you'll never find them together! And if you do find them together, that person is lying.


Posted by: Po-Mo Polymath | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 7:41 PM
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I used to think that, until I discovered I was listening to the wrong _kind_ of country.

I have to admit, I've become way more sympathetic to (certain genres of) country music over the last three years. It was entirely by accident, but at some point I noticed that my interests in singer/songwriters took my into some areas that were definitely country.

There was the Townes Van Zandt to Guy Clark angle, and the Johnny Cash to Willie Nelson angle. And then I started listening to some bluegrass and I realized that, if I was okay with that, I couldn't really say bad things about country.

Let's take as a given that generic pop country is no better than any other generic pop music but Corb Lund is awesome. Ian Tyson has written some classic songs (hmm, they're both Canadian, perhaps that's the key).

Most recently I've been realizing that Lefty Frizzell was completely great and he's absolutely twangy.


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 7:43 PM
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re 19, a description of (German) right wing populism from Die Zeit seems appropriate here:

Die Bereitschaft, Minderheiten herabzuwürdigen, kombinierte sich mit viel Larmoyanz in eigener Sache. Ich heule, also hab ich recht

Somebody has been watching Glen Beck.

Alles, was rechts ist


Posted by: teraz kurwa my | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 7:43 PM
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77: Wikipedia says the polka is still there.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 7:44 PM
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Oh, and "Po-Mo!"

Also, parsimon, I'm not trying to talk you into anything or make you feel guilty, just mentioning that I've been thinking about country music lately (on and off).


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 7:45 PM
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That's what I thought, but I wasn't seeing it, then thought better of the whole thing anyway.

Good call. Looking at CL personals just now to see what this captcha thing is about made me wonder why anyone even bothers with them.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 7:45 PM
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83: Because of the inscrutable longing of the human heart.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 7:46 PM
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I guess so, but damn, that's gotta be some intense longing.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 7:47 PM
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It's also very frequently flagged longing, if I recall from my last time in that internetical netherworld.


Posted by: Po-Mo Polymath | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 7:52 PM
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Polkas aren't really all that common in Poland, much more of a Polish-American thing. So you could argue that 'acculturating' means picking up the polka rather than the reverse.


Posted by: teraz kurwa my | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 7:54 PM
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Also, parsimon, I'm not trying to talk you into anything or make you feel guilty

No, you're making complete sense. I mean, I like Townes van Zandt. I can't quite get to Willie Nelson, I'm afraid, but given that I favor acoustic singer-songwriters of the folky persuasion (shut up, you guys), it's inevitable that there's a country leaning there at times. I know.

I'm not sure how to characterize the kind of twangy country that I cannot stand, but it is a real thing -- I know it when I hear it. I just don't really know how to cordon it off in genre terms.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 7:54 PM
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87: Were polkas common in Poland 100 year ago or so?


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 7:57 PM
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How about..."what they play on CMT"


Posted by: Cryptic ned | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 7:57 PM
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way more sympathetic to (certain genres of) country music over the last three years

Me too. "Country" is a really big umbrella.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 7:59 PM
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87: Were polkas common in Poland 100 year ago or so?

One hundred years ago was during the partition period, so there were a lot of divisions: some people wore polka dots, others, stripes. Houndstooth had its partisans, too. It's really a fascinating fashion history they've got.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 8:01 PM
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90: If CMT is Country Music TV (guessing, slightly), that probably covers it, except that I don't watch it and don't really know what they play/show. People wearing cowboy hats?


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 8:03 PM
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Fucking around on the guitar a bit with a countryish drinking song:

when you're feelin' alone you
drink marc de bourgogne,
you can cut your heart loose
with some yellow chartreuse

you'll get over her, man
if you've got St. Germain
find it isn't so hard, no
if you've got Luxardo

and then drain your last drop o'
some riserva grappa
spend your last do re mi
on some fine eau de vie

you'll find that it's no big deal, you can really kick her,
just as long as you've got a bar full of SWPL liquor


Posted by: Mr. Blandings | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 8:03 PM
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given that I favor acoustic singer-songwriters of the folky persuasion

If your internet connection will allow, I'm curious what you would make of this, Dolly Parton in 1974 performing "Jolene", her first hit. To me it sounds as folky as anything.


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 8:04 PM
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New contest: Come up with Parsimon's all-time least favorite country song.

My nomination: "Love Like Crazy"


Posted by: Cryptic ned | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 8:06 PM
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94: Outstanding work! Of what is it to the tune?

I feel I should share a rejected verse from a recent country-ish song I wrote, even though it doesn't mention booze. It's from the point of view of a bicycle repair person, and this verse got rejected by a bandmate on the grounds that I had "jumped from Ryan Adams to Shel Silverstein":

I ain't much for judgin'
But this here one's a sure curmudgeon
You can push and pull
but I'm doubtful
that anything's a budgin'.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 8:08 PM
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94: Very good.

97: Sell it to the prune people as a jingle. "Curmudgeon" could become a euphemism for "constipation."


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 8:14 PM
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Shel Silverstein wrote a bunch of country songs.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 8:15 PM
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Kobe scored a lot of points.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 8:19 PM
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101

But not 100.


Posted by: Mr. Blandings | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 8:21 PM
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It's a lie we let live in our midst.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 8:23 PM
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103

Come up with Parsimon's all-time least favorite country song.

What's the fun in that?

I can't quite get to Willie Nelson

If you want one place to start here is a fun contemporary version of "Crazy" that is not very country at all, while treating the song as a respected classic. Then, if you like, you can listen to the original demo Willie Nelson recorded for Patsy Cline. Even then it was pretty jazzy. Thematically and lyrically the song is pure country, but musically it borrows from a lot of different styles of popular music.

And he's a fantastic singer. Listen to the way, on the demo, that he sings the lines, "I knew that you loved me as long as you wanted. / And then someday you'd leave me for somebody new."

It's both artful and also sincere, open, and vulnerable. He performs the entire song with just a touch of surprise and confusion in his voice which seems perfect to me. He isn't surprised that she left, he's surprised that, for how predictable it was, he had managed to convince himself for so long that that things might not turn out that way.


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 8:23 PM
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Fucking around on the guitar a bit with a countryish drinking song:

Very nice. It also made me think of this chorus: "Schnapps chianti porter and ouzo / Pernod vodka sambuca, I love you so"


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 8:28 PM
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I never knew Willie Nelson wrote "Crazy". Thanks, NickS.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 8:30 PM
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95: I'll give it a shot. It's funny, because I've been trying to think of who my emblematic not-favored country artists are, and Dolly Parton came to mind (unfair, I know, since she's honored by people whose taste I respect). I can't really name true candidates because I turn the stuff off if/when it crops up on the radio.

Meanwhile some early Rolling Stones is on the radio, and of course I hear the 'country' there, but per ttaM upthread, it's blues.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 8:37 PM
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104: Alternatively, this chorus: "Whiskey, vodka, special brew, all of this is good for you/Gin sling, cointreau, brandy sour, blot right out soul happy hour"


Posted by: Mr. Blandings | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 8:38 PM
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Not much on country but happily imbibing a SWPLicious Hungarian imitation of a good Mosel Spaetlese, Hetszolo Tokaj Late Harvest 2006 Furmint.


Posted by: teraz kurwa my | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 8:43 PM
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Pruno and Disneyland.

On the subject of drinks, we just bottled 34 cases of Syrah. How the hell did we end up with so much Syrah? There are other things to be bottled, but I'm off to see Storm Large.


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 8:44 PM
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95: I'll give it a shot.

I'll be curious what you make of it. It is a huge hit, but I hadn't heard it prior to a couple of a months ago so, as I said, by that point I was already coming around to idea that I was happy to encounter country music that I liked.

But, listening to that, I would say it's one of my favorite pop songs of any genre. It has an amazing pop hook with the "Jolene, Jolene, Jolene, Jolene" in the chorus, and the rest of the song is tasteful and gorgeous.

And, watching that live performance, her voice is amazing. It's not that taxing a song, but she sings it like she has unlimited power to spare. The song has plenty of force, and she isn't reaching at all to get that.

||

Also, just looking up singer/songwriters on youtube, this performance of John Prine covering Steve Goodman's "My Old Man" is very good.

|>


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 8:48 PM
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109.2: Enough to recall this (non-country) song's strained wine rhyme: "Curses to this mirage / a bottle of ancient Shiraz."


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 8:48 PM
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19: I must confess, I didn't get any further than: "Our houses are protected by the good Lord and a gun/And you might meet 'em both if you show up here not welcome, son." Good ol' good ol' boy hospitality! (and a curious theology: if God, why the gun?).


Posted by: Mary Catherine | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 8:48 PM
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98: it's just metonymy, really.


Posted by: Turgid Jacobian | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 8:52 PM
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If I love syrah from the Northern Rhone, and hate it from California and Australia, would I like it? And if so, how might I get a bottle?


Posted by: Mr. Blandings | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 8:53 PM
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||

My, there's some random music on youtube ("Another Brick In the Wall (ocarina cover)") .

|>


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 8:59 PM
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111: The problem isn't just that it's strained, but that Shiraz is the name only in Australia. In France, for which the narrator is pining, it's Syrah, which would have worked equally well as a rhyme.

In addition to which, the next verse is: "On the old left bank/my baby in a charabanc/riding up the width and length/of the Champs Elysees"

The Champs Elysees of course being located on the Right Bank.


Posted by: Mr. Blandings | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 9:06 PM
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110: Nick: I have heard that version of Jolene -- apparently the original -- before. It's a classic. I don't really find it very powerful, to be honest: it's a little too fast-paced for my tastes. It doesn't allow Parton to use her voice to its presumable full power*, though it's not like that's required for every song. As you say, it's not a very taxing song, vocally, to begin with. You can sing it with your teeth nearly clenched, which is what she's nearly doing.

That's maybe a stylistic thing, of the times.

Does it sound "country"? Absolutely. It's got that swaying back and forth thing, and the lyrics. Are we supposed to be gay or bummed out about Jolene potentially taking her man?

* I should say: I don't really like the distinctive quaver that Parton has in her singing voice. That has nothing to do with the whole country music question.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 9:31 PM
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116.last: Which bank has the Taco Bell?


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 9:37 PM
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I came across this quite excellent White Stripes cover of Jolene.


Posted by: Sir Kraab | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 9:37 PM
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111, 116: Next you'll complain that refrigerators can't be plugged in in the desert and thus are not useful to a legionnaire on a camel.


Posted by: essear | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 9:37 PM
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I'm reminded that I learned two things at the recent Garrison Keillor show I took my mom to like a dutiful, patient son: (1) Sara Watkins is fucking amazing and (2) Nickelback and Nickel Creek are two different bands.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 9:40 PM
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118: There's a Pizza Hut on the right bank. Maybe they could be persuaded to upgrade to a Combination Pizza Hut and Taco Bell.


Posted by: essear | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 9:40 PM
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Well thank you for giving it a shot.

Does it sound "country"? Absolutely. It's got that swaying back and forth thing, and the lyrics. Are we supposed to be gay or bummed out about Jolene potentially taking her man?

This is a good point. It is way more common in country for the mood of the music to not match the mood of the lyrics. That is definitely a big stumbling block for me appreciating country music.

As I said, I come to it from the singer/songwriter direction and my expectation is that the words, music, and performance will all contribute to express some emotional experience, and I find it off putting when you have some generic honkey-tonk music backing a intensely emotional song.

In that case it doesn't bug me because what I like about the song is not the emotional impact (which is unusual in my tastes). As I said, I think it has just a fantastic pop hook, and in that case that's more than enough for me.


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 9:41 PM
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Did someone here recently link that song? For some reason the godawful instant-earworm part of my brain got fixated on the phrase "Combination Standpipe and Sprinkler" to that tune yesterday.


Posted by: essear | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 9:41 PM
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124 to my 122.


Posted by: essear | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 9:41 PM
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122: Right bank going upstream or downstream?


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 9:45 PM
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Downstream.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 9:48 PM
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119: Actually I don't think the song plays to The White Stripes strengths. Nor do I think this cover of Jolene by Lay Low is that good (too fast for one thing). But, Reykjavik. No beverage though.


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 9:50 PM
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Well thank you for giving it a shot.

I feel I may have disappointed you. I'd just have enjoyed her being more full-throated about the whole thing.

It is way more common in country for the mood of the music to not match the mood of the lyrics.

Well said. Nick, you do know, I hope, that you speak well and clearly about music, and it's appreciated. I'm not very practiced in talking about music in this way.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 9:57 PM
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I feel I may have disappointed you.

Oh, not at all.

It was just that I knew that you weren't going to listen to much (and why should you if you don't like it), so I was trying to figure out what song I could think of that would both be well within the country tradition and also something that you would like. That was my attempt, so I'm disappointed that I wasn't able to pick successfully, but not disaapointed that you didn't like the song.


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:02 PM
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121: Nickelback opens for Keillor? Also, that's really dedicated son-manship.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:03 PM
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The link in 79 is great, but I am distressed to see that Lefty Frizzell played guitar right handed.


Posted by: rob helpy-chalk | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:06 PM
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Coming back late to the thread, after a fairly intense play set on the Navajo Rez. Think classical Greek drama, with four actresses and no actors. Anyway, I'm ok with most non-Nashville, not-too-tribal country music. Asleep at the Wheel is fun to see live, and I'm quite fine with Peter Rowan, and reggaebilly and all that. Parsi, did you ever see that thing on PBS where they had R&B stars doing duets with legends of country music? They must have had it during pledge week for 10 years running. Al Green and Lyle Lovett singing a Willie Nelson song. Conway Twitty and Sam Moore on Rainy Night in Georgia, Aaron Neville & Trisha Yearwood with a Patsy Cline song -- it was kind of mind opening the first time. Patti Labelle & Travis Tritt.


Posted by: CharleyCarp | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:07 PM
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Teo, if you're still 'round, look for it: The Frybread Queen. This was the premier engagement. It'll be staged in LA next year, and I suppose it'll get to the east someday.


Posted by: CharleyCarp | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:09 PM
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Coming back late to the thread, after a fairly intense play set on the Navajo Rez. Think classical Greek drama, with four actresses and no actors.

Intriguing.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:11 PM
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that's really dedicated son-manship.

Yeah, it was for her birthday. And I think I finally paid off the emotional debt incurred when I forgot her birthday a few years back. Crap.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:11 PM
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130: Ah, okay. But babe, the truth is that I probably already do listen to things that might, according to some convoluted argument, fall under the rubric of 'country', though I'll tell you that it's folk.

If you or I can manage to come up with an understanding of what makes something 'fall well within the country tradition', as you just put it, then progress might be made. I'm torn between saying that this is a silly exercise, and being somewhat fascinated by the fact that I know it when I hear it, even though I can't say what it is. Maybe because it's midnight.

I'll put this on hold, and pay more attention to the music I like and listen to.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:26 PM
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The boundaries do get blurred, but I think Lucinda Williams is another route into country. Can't go too wrong, but on the "country" side of her stuff I'd suggest "Changed the Locks". Bonus strong effort from another Louisiana singer, Mary Gauthier with "Sugar Cane"--maybe better classified as folk.


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:29 PM
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133L Parsi, did you ever see that thing on PBS where they had R&B stars doing duets with legends of country music? They must have had it during pledge week for 10 years running. Al Green and Lyle Lovett singing a Willie Nelson song. Conway Twitty and Sam Moore on Rainy Night in Georgia, Aaron Neville & Trisha Yearwood with a Patsy Cline song -- it was kind of mind opening the first time

I didn't. Wow. I like Lyle Lovett. I have strong responses to the Neville brothers. Huh.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:33 PM
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Do you listen to Steve Earle?


Posted by: Mr. Blandings | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:37 PM
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Al Green and Lyle Lovett singing a Willie Nelson song

I found that one. It's very likable, but I think it plays like an experiment that isn't completely comfortable. They're both adjusting their styles quite a bit.

I have become convinced that Lyle Lovett is (at least sometimes) an amazing singer. Unfortunately I don't consistently like him, so I don't send that much time listening to his stuff, but when he's on he's darn near perfect.


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:40 PM
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As another non-country fan, I like the Gauthier. Changed the locks is ok, but doesn't really do anything for me. And seeing as I'm youtube surfing, I ran into a nice 1978 performance of Radio, Radio by Elvis Costello.


Posted by: teraz kurwa my | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:50 PM
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Look for the Sam Moore one, NickS.


Posted by: CharleyCarp | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 10:56 PM
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The classic "Radio, Radio" remains this one.

I myself have been youtube surfing western swing for the classics of the genre.


Posted by: Mr. Blandings | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 11:00 PM
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cAA_LUCb0QE


Posted by: | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 11:04 PM
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The classic "Radio, Radio" remains this one.

But I show my age.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 11:12 PM
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Get the hell off my lawn.


Posted by: Mr. Blandings | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 11:17 PM
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Shouldn't that be 'Get the hell off my stoop'?


Posted by: teraz kurwa my | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 11:24 PM
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144.1: "Reprised" with the Beastie Boys here.


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 09-18-10 11:25 PM
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Can there be any real debate about the most memorable combination of beverage and place name in a country song? It's obviously the classic "If there's no Mogen David in Heaven, then who in the Hell wants to go?"

Honorable mention goes to Hank Williams, Jr. For the mention of New York city and homemade wine in "A Country Boy Can Survive."


Posted by: Knecht Ruprecht | Link to this comment | 09-19-10 3:11 AM
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"a man after my own heart...with a razor." big ups to bob wills and his texas playboys (and light crust doughboys, but perhaps less so.) parsimon, if you can make it through a carter family "may the circle be unbroken" without distinct moistening of the eyen, I will...um...marvel incredulously. wildwood flower? the music/lyrics disconnect reaches a fever pitch in bluegrass. I feel like getting up and dancing a merry jig at this 1 min 59 sec tale of suicide and double-murder!


Posted by: alameida | Link to this comment | 09-19-10 5:23 AM
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150: Could this perhaps be from the oeuvre of Kinky Freedman and the Texas Jewboys?


Posted by: Mister Smearcase | Link to this comment | 09-19-10 6:18 AM
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It's obviously the classic "If there's no Mogen David in Heaven, then who in the Hell wants to go?"

Reminds me of a song that I should have thought of a while ago, which mentions Mad Dog Margaritas and Dublin (and the Spanish Steps, Fort Worth, and Austin).

No that is a song about both alcohol and place.


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 09-19-10 9:11 AM
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re: 151

The Light Crust Doughboys are pretty great, the stuff I've heard. Lots of surprisingly swinging jazzy playing, once you get past some of the novelty lyrics. Also, Hank Penny, Bob Willis [as mentioned], some Spade Cooley, Tex Williams, Tennessee Ernie Ford, etc are all in that sort of space.

More recently, Wayne Hancock can be pretty great although is voice is in the twangy-ish range, there's a nice boogie/swing vibe to a lot of the backing music.


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 09-19-10 11:54 AM
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If I love syrah from the Northern Rhone, and hate it from California and Australia, would I like it? And if so, how might I get a bottle?

Maybe you'd like it, I'm not sure how much I do. It's not cooked or jammy, which are what I associate with Australian and Californian Syrah, but it is Yakima Valley fruit, and it started out pretty ripe. Plus, it's totally unblended, so it's straight up Syrah without added nuance. That said, I think we did a decent job of getting what we could from it, and it should age pretty well. I'll email you.

I just got a text this morning from one of my winemaking partners saying that a neighbor of his has 300 lbs. of Sangiovese from around Lodi that he suddenly can't use, and do we want it for 200 bucks? Nice surprise, potentially.


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 09-19-10 2:18 PM
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300 lbs. of Sangiovese from around Lodi that he suddenly can't use, and do we want it for 200 bucks

Just nosy: what would that amount of those grapes normally go for? And how much wine would it typically yield?


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-19-10 2:37 PM
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Hard to say, because I don't know what vineyard they came from, but they should be pretty good given the general area; they were worth shipping up here in a refrigerated truck, apparently. $1-3 per pound is typical for decent fruit, so it could be a good deal. 300 lbs ought to make 5-6 cases.


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 09-19-10 2:45 PM
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I'll probably take 30-50 lbs off my vines in a couple weeks. No idea what kind of grapes they are; I know they've been used for winemaking in the past. Any ideas on what I should do, Jesus? The local winery wouldn't take them no matter what, since they're not certified organic.


Posted by: CharleyCarp | Link to this comment | 09-19-10 2:48 PM
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As a rule of thumb, it takes about 2.4 pounds of grapes (usually 600 to 800 grapes) to produce a bottle of wine. "

The red grapes normally cost between $35 - $40 per box, and the white juices usually costs between $72 - $80.

California grapes are sold in wooden boxes called lugs. Each lug weighs 36 lbs. When making red wine, each lug usually produces 2.5 gallons of wine.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 09-19-10 2:48 PM
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158: You should vinify them, of course. You can test for ripeness with a refractometer (great excuse to acquire a cool tool!) or just do it by taste and by inspecting the pips, which should be brown (insert Gladys Knight joke here). With only 30-50 lbs, you can crush by hand, and you could ferment in a small (food-grade) plastic bucket. Email me if you want more details. I'd be really curious to know what variety they are. If ari really has any pull at the university where he works, he could hook you up with an ampelographer from the viticulture school to identify them.


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 09-19-10 3:03 PM
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"A Country Boy Can Survive."

I'd spit a load o' beech nut in that dude's eye, then shoot him with my ol' 45.


Posted by: Turgid Jacobian | Link to this comment | 09-19-10 5:37 PM
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158: My dad and my uncle made wine in the basement from grapes growing in a Nebraska housing plan. It tasted alarming like wine made in a basement with grapes from a Nebraska housing plan.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 09-19-10 5:44 PM
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