Re: Guest Post - technical, maybe boring.

1

My senior high school science research paper was on graphene (well, mostly buckyballs). So rad.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 12:02 PM
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On topic because it falls under the general topic of "science I don't understand": Best abstract ever.


Posted by: MAE | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 12:06 PM
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My advisor has a paper where the abstract just says "At times".


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 12:10 PM
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I'm paraphrasing for anonymity.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 12:10 PM
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I have discovered a completely novel form of carbon.


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 12:20 PM
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Your links are broken.

Also: graphene, graphene, graphene, all people do anymore is talk about graphene. </curmudgeon>


Posted by: essear | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 12:21 PM
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Oh yeah? YOUR links are dirty sluts.

I mean, fixed!


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 12:38 PM
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6: I hope I was clear enough with my implication in 1 that I was into it before it was cool.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 12:42 PM
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8: It is cooler now.


Posted by: delurking | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 12:53 PM
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I think production of uniform systems is the real challenge in carbon-based materials. The chip's edges look non-uniform compared to the center in Fig. 1. The C-C bonds are stong, and formation is difficult to reverse if there's an error. Also not sure how I feel about NbSe2 in manufacture. Ick. Carbon nanotubes are pretty hot, but y'all have seen the uniquely named copper nanotubes, right?


Posted by: ydnew | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 12:55 PM
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9: That's a pretty standard protocol for reductions; I guess they wanted pretty pics to get it into that journal?


Posted by: ydnew | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 12:57 PM
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10: Baby, your copper nanotube is so tight!


Posted by: MAE | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 1:19 PM
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Though calling it a heterojunction seems so heteronormative.


Posted by: MAE | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 1:20 PM
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11: never underestimate the power of pretty figures.


Posted by: delurking | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 1:21 PM
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Cool. Just check the author list to make sure that Jan Hendrik Schon isn't listed.


Posted by: AcademicLurker | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 1:51 PM
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13, homojunctions are still illegal in 37 states.
11, Why do good science when you can do pretty science?


Posted by: ydnew | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 2:00 PM
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11, Why do good science when you can do pretty science?

The two are strongly correlated, IME.


Posted by: essear | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 3:08 PM
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18

[redacted]


Posted by: x.trapnel | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 3:17 PM
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I guess I'd disagree with pretty being correlated to good. The paper linked above uses a bog standard reduction that happens to turn very dark blue. It is a pretty color (and interesting the first time you run that reaction), but that's about it, really. No need to include a picture with a paper. There's a running joke in my field that taking photos of vials with different colored contents will automatically get your paper into a higher journal than it maybe deserves. There's definitely pretty and good work, too, like these very pretty and useful dyes. Perhaps I'm misunderstanding, and you're referring to results presented in an eye-pleasing fashion as pretty when I'm meaning putting in colored photos to shorthand how cool the work itself is?


Posted by: ydnew | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 3:57 PM
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Perhaps I'm misunderstanding, and you're referring to results presented in an eye-pleasing fashion as pretty when I'm meaning putting in colored photos to shorthand how cool the work itself is?

Yeah, I guess we're talking past each other. I mean people who put care into making their visuals comprehensible and clear and aesthetically nice tend to be people who put care into making their thoughts and arguments clear as well, IM(narrow)E.


Posted by: essear | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 4:39 PM
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Also fun: Ignition!


Posted by: torrey pine (YK) | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 4:40 PM
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6.2 was kind of silly. I have to admit graphene is pretty interesting.


Posted by: essear | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 4:49 PM
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Comity, then.


Posted by: ydnew | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 4:52 PM
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||

O'Reilly is publishing a book dedicated to Dwarf Fortress.

|>


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 5:30 PM
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Solar panels are cool. Know what's cooler? Graphene supercapacitors. (Sorry for the Slate link.)


Posted by: Chopper | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 5:51 PM
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And then at the other end of the spectrum, we have FarmVille for Dummies. [The obvious joke is made here by reference.]


Posted by: x.trapnel | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 5:52 PM
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I was going to complain about the preëmptive apology for Slate-linking in 25, but then I saw that the article was by Farhad Manjoo, so yeah, fair enough.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 6:54 PM
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28

Didn't we have a presidential commenter who worked on those and even better had a mildly salacious academic throwdown that she liveblogged for us which better yet resulted in the total destruction of an eminently deserving slimeball? I wish she would come back and talk to us about them.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 6:57 PM
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I don't think said commenter actually specified what it was she worked on.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 6:59 PM
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Well let's just imagine together that she worked on graphene supercapacitors. Or maybe the application of graphene supercapacitors to paleolinguistic analysis of words for sweet potato.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 7:08 PM
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Historical linguistics actually doesn't require a whole lot of energy storage.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 7:10 PM
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32

But big data!


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 7:11 PM
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I guess we could just talk about words for sweet potato again. Where's essear?


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 7:12 PM
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Actually I will tell you what I don't understand: how do historical linguists know that some changes are less likely than others in a given language family? Just by analysis of descended words where the linkage is known for sure?


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 7:13 PM
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how do historical linguists know that some changes are less likely than others in a given language family? Just by analysis of descended words where the linkage is known for sure?

Some changes are considered more or less likely based on phonological universals, many of which are tied to articulatory constraints. I guess it's also at least possible to conclude that certain changes are more likely in a given family because they are similar to other changes that are known to have occurred in that family, but I can't think of any examples.

In general, though, this isn't really how historical linguistics works; instead you start by looking at phonetic correspondences between languages and figuring out which changes in the proto-language are most likely to have resulted in those correspondences. The a priori likelihood of those changes based on other factors is mostly used to evaluate the plausibility of the reconstruction, but it's not usually a huge factor in that. Very "unlikely" changes are widely accepted in some very well-established language families. Armenian is one of the best examples.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 7:28 PM
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instead you start by looking at phonetic correspondences between languages and figuring out which changes in the proto-language are most likely to have resulted in those correspondences

But how do you know that you're not telling a just-so story? (I kind of want the answer to involve lots of statistics but I feel like that might be unlikely given the historical development of the field.)


Posted by: essear | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 8:32 PM
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37

Woah, I missed 28.

While they do have some sense of which sounds are likely to knock down other sounds and take their lunch money, I think historical linguists sense of likely and unlikely is driven by how parsimonious the set of sound changes are. A spectacular example of this is Sassure's laryngreal theory for proto-Indo-European. Some patterns in Indo-European languages were explained by proposing that some words had initial consonants that were absorbed by the neighboring vowels. Then when they deciphered Hittite, it turned out to actually have consonants in the proposed places.


Posted by: Walt Someguy | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 8:36 PM
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28 resulted in the total destruction of an eminently deserving slimeball?

Wait, were there further interesting developments not reported in the original thread?


Posted by: essear | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 8:43 PM
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Historical linguists fear and hate statistics, so the danger of a just-so story is there. I think it'll be another generation before any serious attempt is made.


Posted by: Walt Someguy | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 8:44 PM
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But how do you know that you're not telling a just-so story?

Basically you don't. It ultimately comes down to whether you can convince other historical linguists that your reconstruction is more reasonable than the alternatives, and parsimony plays a big role in this as Walt notes in 37. Walt is also correct in 39 that statistics doesn't really play much of a role. Historical linguistics is very much a humanistic discipline rather than a science.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 9:06 PM
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I'm now wasting an inordinate amount of time trying to track down the paper that was discussed in the thread Sifu referred to, to see if any publicized negative fallout happened. Found one possible candidate but no public shame seems attached to it so far.


Posted by: essear | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 9:11 PM
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42

I'm with 38. I don't recall such further developments coming up.


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 9:40 PM
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I'm about 95% confident now that I did track down the paper in question. So if justice has been meted out, it is not yet apparent from the journal's webpage.


Posted by: essear | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 9:47 PM
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44

J. Org. Chem 36:1 184-186 (1971) "Comparative Mobility of Halogens in Reactions of Dihalobenzenes
with Potassium Amide in Ammonia"
Written in free verse. Behind a paywall but here's a sample from the end:


The haloanilines do not react
Extensively with excess amide ion,
As shown in Table III. In harmony
Appears the fact that yields of halide ion
With surplus amide ion slightly exceed
One ion from each dihalobenzene molecule
(Table I). However, ortho-iodo
Substrates afford much more halide ion
Than can be attributed to subsequent
Attack on the haloanilines that form.
An unexpected pathway of reaction,
Unclear in its details, is thus revealed.
This complication, our thanks to him,
Is under study by Jhong Kook Kim.


Posted by: SP | Link to this comment | 06-28-13 10:25 PM
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45

36 was my hope as well. Oh well!


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 4:37 AM
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46

Also oh darn re: justice. It sounded like things were headed that direction.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 4:44 AM
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47

|| Hey teo, did you hear that the latest defender of the Washington Redskins' name is a self-styled "full blooded American Inuit chief originally from the Aleut Tribes of Alaska"? See, he doesn't have a problem with the name because "when we were on the reservation, we'd call each other 'hey what's up redskin?'" Historical linguists will unearth the video, which will tell them much they hadn't yet learned about social structures in Alaska. (Or Ohio, where the guy is actually from.) |>


Posted by: CharleyCarp | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 6:26 AM
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48

Ohioans have 36 words for offensive racial terminology.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 6:33 AM
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49

48: And mixed messages.


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 6:42 AM
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47: I dunno, that guy's nickname is Chief. Seems legit.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 6:45 AM
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Buckyballs, discovered in the 80s by people looking at soot, were a precursor, are themselves.

When you get down to it, isn't everything itself?


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 8:15 AM
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52

Or if not then, at least when you get right down to it?


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 8:16 AM
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53

44 has made my day!


Posted by: torrey pine | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 9:13 AM
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54

Vaguely topical: the largest geodesic dome is in Omaha.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 9:24 AM
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Not so, according to Wikipedia. Seems it's just the world's largest glazed geodesic dome. But, you know, glazed is always better than unglazed.


Posted by: essear | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 11:16 AM
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Yum. Glazed dippin' dome.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 11:17 AM
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OT:

I have a technical, quite possibly boring question: I am not receiving email notifications from Facebook in my regular email client when someone sends me email via Facebook. I can't figure out how to tell FB to send me a notice. ? I remember that this was an issue maybe 6 months or a year ago, when FB changed its default protocol for emails ... um, I am just not seeing how or where to tell it to send me a notification.

Update: Okay, I receive notice of new messages sent via FB, but not of replies.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 11:47 AM
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55: Who are you going to believe, Wikipedia or a teenaged tram driver?


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 12:42 PM
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47: Yeah. This article is a good discussion of the issue from an Alaska perspective.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 2:16 PM
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For those who are looking for statistical approaches to historical linguistics, there's this.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 2:22 PM
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For the record, the adult tram driver agreed with Wikipedia.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 2:58 PM
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"Adult tram" analogous to "adult movie"?


Posted by: essear | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 3:46 PM
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Mmmmmm, ride the love tram to the big, glazed dome.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 4:25 PM
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There's a creepy subculture that makes and shares videos taken from ground level of trams connecting to overhead wires.


Posted by: fake accent | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 4:49 PM
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|| Tough mudder completed. As Ajay said, not actually that tough, if you can run 8 miles and do one pull up you can do this. However, Ajay lied about the "electric eel" obstacle, where they shock you as you go through water, which was like a day visit to a Syrian prison.|>


Posted by: Robert Halford | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 5:11 PM
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64: This was a tram by function, not form. By appearance, it was a tractor pulling a few small trailers.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 5:17 PM
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67

That sounds very Nebraskan.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 5:18 PM
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Did each trailer have to pay for its own ticket?


Posted by: fake accent | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 5:44 PM
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I told myself this morning I would work my way through a to-do list of stuff I meant to, but didn't, get done earlier this week. Instead, among other procrastinatory things, I've managed to waste a couple hours playing "Sleuth", which was my favorite DOS game when I was a kid.


Posted by: essear | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 5:49 PM
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The movie's good too.


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 5:55 PM
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First one.


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 6:16 PM
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I managed to almost finish moving from one apartment to another today.


Posted by: fake accent | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 6:26 PM
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I managed to almost finish moving from one apartment to another today.


Posted by: fake accent | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 6:26 PM
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Why'd you have to have that intermediate apartment between the first and the last?


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 6:29 PM
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I didn't get any closer to finishing moving the second time I posted that.


Posted by: fake accent | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 6:30 PM
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For those of you who don't keep close track of geodesic domes with glazing, I was at the zoo.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 6:34 PM
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77

71: I haven't seen the second, truth be told.


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 6:53 PM
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78

Have they improved the big cat accommodations there yet? Always so depressing to see the tigers in their tiny concrete cells.


Posted by: Natilo Paennim | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 6:53 PM
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78 to 73.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 6:55 PM
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78: Didn't get to those, but I'd bet so. Lots of change.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 7:02 PM
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Well, that's good. Just looked through a history of the zoo in photos, and was saddened to read of the break in in 1969 when a 10 year old and 11 year old attacked animals in the petting zoo, killing 32 of them. I don't know if that is better or worse than the kids who killed the polar bear in the Como Zoo in the 80s. It just seems particularly horrible. Not that much different from what happens to the 9 billion animals we destroy every year for agribusiness in this country, I guess.


Posted by: Natilo Paennim | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 7:09 PM
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1979 for the polar bear incident, I guess. People are fucked up.


Posted by: Natilo Paennim | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 7:14 PM
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83

They wand the kids before they get near a pygmy goat now.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 7:33 PM
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"Sifu asked: Didn't we have a presidential commenter who worked on those and even better had a mildly salacious academic throwdown that she liveblogged for us which better yet resulted in the total destruction of an eminently deserving slimeball? I wish she would come back and talk to us about them".

Well, here I am, a day late and a dollar short. Sorry about that, I just can't keep up with you guys. My advice is to beware of all the breathless claims you read about energy storage devices in news articles-Slate or otherwise (although I am a fan of Farhad Manjoo). There are a whole lot of people who are trying to get tenure or great jobs or whatever and talking up their technologies to gullible journalists, who pass on the absurd claims without questioning them. Also there is a lot of money sloshing around in energy storage right now, not all of it wisely spent. You can't charge up a device with a lot of energy density rapidly without melting a bunch of wires or worse, so the dream of combining the power density of a supercap with the energy density of a battery will not come to pass. Packing a lot of energy into a small space starts to sound a lot like a bomb-trying to balance energy density with safety is just one of the challenges that make battery development so daunting.

As for the outcome of the aforementioned liveblogged dispute, the journal is supposed to add a correction in the printed version (which of course no one reads nowadays) and add it to the online version when the printed version comes out (don't ask me why, the vagaries of publishing are a mystery to me). The wheels of justice turn slowly or something. Mr. Snake, with whom I work on a number of committees, is appropriately abject and remorseful. I'm sort of enjoying it, actually.


Posted by: Madame Curie | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 7:35 PM
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I'm sort of enjoying it, actually.

I'm so pleased to hear this.


Posted by: redfoxtailshrub | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 7:38 PM
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Packing a lot of energy into a small space starts to sound a lot like a bomb-trying to balance energy density with safety is just one of the challenges that make battery development so daunting.

I'LL SAY.


Posted by: OPINIONATED BOEING | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 7:40 PM
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So that is why the super capacitor hype is kinda BS! Neat. I imagined it was, but that wouldn't have occurred to me.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 7:45 PM
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|| With the readerpocalypse upon us I've been getting newsblur set up, and I figured I'd try adding the unfogged comment feed again. I've got it set up so that it works nicely, except that it doesn't have the comment numbers. I have no idea if that's a reasonable feature request, but it would make the feed make a lot more sense. |>


Posted by: Unfoggetarian: "Pause endlessly, then go in" (9) | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 8:10 PM
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I'm sort of enjoying it, actually.

Yay!


Posted by: essear | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 8:43 PM
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My advice is to beware of all the breathless claims you read about energy storage devices in news articles-Slate or otherwise (although I am a fan of Farhad Manjoo). There are a whole lot of people who are trying to get tenure or great jobs or whatever and talking up their technologies to gullible journalists, who pass on the absurd claims without questioning them.

I'd say things look pretty similar from over here on the deployment end. We recently had a community buy a fancy state-of-the-art battery to use with their wind farm, and once they had shipped it all the way up and tried to connect it the damn thing didn't work. They eventually sent it back to the manufacturer, who may not be able fix it, and now the community's back to where they started except for all the money they spent.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 06-29-13 8:50 PM
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62: "Adult tram" analogous to "adult movie"?

Or "adult blog".


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 06-30-13 12:09 AM
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Hmm, graphene to me is "that stuff George Osborne makes sure to mention just before his latest disastrous economic policy because science futurey." He doesn't miss an opportunity.


Posted by: Alex | Link to this comment | 06-30-13 1:24 AM
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77: 71: I haven't seen the second, truth be told.

I went in predisposed to like it given Michael Caine playing the older half this time around, but now cannot really remember a thing about it. And in retrospect why did I even expect it would be any good?


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 06-30-13 1:40 AM
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94

Graphene #aspenideas


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 06-30-13 1:40 AM
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95

However, Ajay lied about the "electric eel" obstacle, where they shock you as you go through water, which was like a day visit to a Syrian prison.

Wait, I thought I was the one who was lying to you about that. (Not lying, exactly, just that I got lucky on that one. For me, the wading-through-ice-water was by far the worst.)

Amusingly enough, some friends of mine were talking about taking a weekend trip to LA, and my first thought was, "Uh, sorry, no, vacations are for people with real jobs and incomes", but then my second thought was, "Hey, no, wait: party at Halford's place!"


Posted by: x.trapnel | Link to this comment | 06-30-13 2:44 AM
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Oh, and yay to 84.


Posted by: x.trapnel | Link to this comment | 06-30-13 2:46 AM
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84 is great.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 06-30-13 5:51 AM
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With the readerpocalypse upon us I've been getting newsblur set up, and I figured I'd try adding the unfogged comment feed again. I've got it set up so that it works nicely, except that it doesn't have the comment numbers. I have no idea if that's a reasonable feature request, but it would make the feed make a lot more sense.

I just added the "Full posts with comments" feed to Feedly, and it's showing the comment numbers. At least on the web version - my phone is out of battery. So it may be an issue at Newsblur's end.


Posted by: Ginger Yellow | Link to this comment | 06-30-13 12:47 PM
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What I'm using is the standpipe feed in forward chronological order on NewsBlur. The posts and comments feed on NewsBlur didn't seem to mark individual comments as read, so involves too much scrolling.


Posted by: Unfoggetarian: "Pause endlessly, then go in" (9) | Link to this comment | 06-30-13 1:50 PM
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94 is great.


Posted by: essear | Link to this comment | 06-30-13 2:03 PM
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65: heh. Either I am made of tougher stuff than Halford or (more likely) simply stuff with a higher coefficient of resistivity. Halford is more sensitive to electricity due to the metallic construction of his endoskeleton.
(Also on mine there were two! electric fence obstacles: but one you could get under without any electrocution if you went flat on your belly with your face in the mud, the other you could get through pretty quickly if you just yelled and ran at it. As long as you didn't trip. If you tripped you just lay there writhing and getting repeatedly shocked.)


Posted by: ajay | Link to this comment | 06-30-13 7:39 PM
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