Re: Survey

1

Much previous political-science research assumes that municipal politics are largely non-ideological.

Really? I'm shocked. I'm sure all of our Republic ex-mayors would agree.


Posted by: dalriata | Link to this comment | 08-15-14 5:23 AM
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2

Republic->Republican


Posted by: dalriata | Link to this comment | 08-15-14 5:23 AM
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3

Oh my god the yellow and green axis with different values is making me want to stab. Did Sifu design that graph?


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 08-15-14 5:31 AM
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4

I guess I see why they did it, but it befuddled me on my phone for a while.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 08-15-14 5:33 AM
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5

If they didn't do that how would they make you understand those values are correlated?


Posted by: dalriata | Link to this comment | 08-15-14 5:34 AM
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6

5 before seeing 4.


Posted by: dalriata | Link to this comment | 08-15-14 5:34 AM
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7

I think the chart in the 2nd link would be much more informative if it also showed the rating for the entire SMSA in which the city lies.


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 08-15-14 6:48 AM
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8

For what I want to see,anyway. Since the paper itself was looking at governance I can see why they would do it by the cities themselves.


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 08-15-14 6:53 AM
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9

Even nearly all-white cities have Democratic leadership for the most part. A party of racial minorities and city dwellers, vs. a party of rural and suburban white people. Just like it was 130 years ago, except at that time it was just "rural" white people.


Posted by: Cryptic ned | Link to this comment | 08-15-14 6:55 AM
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10

Percentage of kids born out of wedlock in countries around the world.

If by "world" you mean "Europe plus the United States"...


Posted by: Spike | Link to this comment | 08-15-14 7:06 AM
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11

Omaha seems to be pretty competitive between the two parts, possibly because it is allowed to swallow its suburbs. Or just because Nebraska.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 08-15-14 7:08 AM
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12

"Parts" s/b "parties"


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 08-15-14 7:08 AM
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13


The second link answers the question I posed a while back.

The hivemind came up with Jacksonville, Colorado Springs, and Virginia Beach, all with caveats.

I would disqualify Mesa, Arlington, Anaheim, and Aurora under the "city worthy of the name" criterion, as they are all very large suburbs masquerading as a cities. Colorado Springs comes very close to disqualification for the same reason, though it is a city in its own right. Jacksonville's urban core is quite Democratic; it only shows up on the list because it encompasses all of suburban Duval County. Per moby hick, Omaha is a similar situation, and I believe Oklahoma City is as well.

So that leaves our hypothetical conservative would-be urban dweller who wants to live among his own kind with Tulsa. Enjoy!


Posted by: knecht ruprecht | Link to this comment | 08-15-14 8:08 AM
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14

I always mix up George Sanders and George Saunders but I like them both so who cares, Edith?


Posted by: Mister Smearcase | Link to this comment | 08-15-14 9:47 AM
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15

13 -- Anaheim isn't all bad. It even has a downtown ... downtown Disney. And weirdly decent train connections.


Posted by: Robert Halford | Link to this comment | 08-15-14 9:52 AM
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16


15: I didn't mean to imply that Anaheim is all bad, just that it doesn't count as a city within the meaning of my question. A conservative who wants new urban amenities and insulation from liberals is basically SOL, while a liberal can easily have suburban amenities and insulation from conservatives (it's true; come visit me and you'll see).


Posted by: knecht ruprecht | Link to this comment | 08-15-14 10:29 AM
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17

16 1 True, though paradoxically in order to have a liberal enclave suburban existence* you have to be very rich (your town, Malibu, Marin County).

*offer guaranteed for social liberalism only. Not valid for issues personally affecting wallets or lifestyles of residents. See zoning plan for details.


Posted by: Robert Halford | Link to this comment | 08-15-14 10:44 AM
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18

16 is a lie. I recently visited PDBS and found it totally lacking in "suburban amenities." I.e. it was a pain in the ass to drive in.


Posted by: L. | Link to this comment | 08-15-14 10:45 AM
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19

Plenty of suburbs are pains in the asses to drive in. The amenity is that you have to drive. Keeps out anybody who can't afford a car and DUI lawyers.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 08-15-14 10:47 AM
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20

it was a pain in the ass to drive in

The relevant comparison is not to sunbelt suburbs, but to the urban core, which, as you are no doubt aware, makes driving in PDBS look blessedly easy.

Also, you should have notified me so we could have an impromptu meetup!


Posted by: knecht ruprecht | Link to this comment | 08-15-14 11:13 AM
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21

The hivemind came up with Jacksonville, Colorado Springs, and Virginia Beach, all with caveats.

And Lubbock, which I presume doesn't show up in the linked survey because its population falls under the 250K cutoff.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 08-15-14 6:34 PM
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