Re: Reviews

1

I choose to believe that they were planning on publishing "Why are white slave-owners always gotta be the bad guys?!" in the issue with the "Why we gotta criminalize businesses, guys?!" cover.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 09- 5-14 3:13 PM
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2

One can only wonder what on earth that guy was thinking.


Posted by: LizardBreath | Link to this comment | 09- 5-14 3:22 PM
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3

Either of them, really, come to think.


Posted by: LizardBreath | Link to this comment | 09- 5-14 3:23 PM
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"I'm tired of white men always being portrayed as villains. Probably most of those men thought they were leading good, honest lives and doing right by their families, just like I try to do."


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 09- 5-14 3:24 PM
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5

[Gazes ashamedly at the Economist subscriber in the mirror.]


Posted by: Flippanter | Link to this comment | 09- 5-14 3:26 PM
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It was a gift. Don't judge me.


Posted by: Flippanter | Link to this comment | 09- 5-14 3:28 PM
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Does anyone know who the reviewer actually was of that Economist review? Economist authors are usually an open secret, but I haven't seen a reveal.


Posted by: Robert Halford | Link to this comment | 09- 5-14 3:40 PM
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I mean the author of the Economist review, of course.


Posted by: Robert Halford | Link to this comment | 09- 5-14 3:40 PM
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9

The Economist is such a "how to be an asshole while feigning knowledge" manual. We do judge you, Flip. Why did someone think you needed that?


Posted by: ogged | Link to this comment | 09- 5-14 3:41 PM
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Economist authors are usually an open secret

This is true of their regular columnists, but this could well have been a one-off. It was so clearly written in about five minutes according to the brief summary-compliments-disagreement formula that it's just barely, barely possible that the guy didn't mean a word of it and doesn't deserve to be outed. I mean, I don't really believe that, but maybe they won't out him.


Posted by: ogged | Link to this comment | 09- 5-14 3:43 PM
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11

Gawker has a much better description of the Economist.

The Economist is an intentionally fusty British news-aggregation magazine for people who pretend their Economy Plus airline seat is a wing chair by the roaring fire in a manor house.


Posted by: ogged | Link to this comment | 09- 5-14 3:47 PM
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I actually like "the how to be an asshole while feigning knowledge manual" better as a one line description of the Economist. There, I said it. You are better than Gawker, Ogged. Breathe it in.


Posted by: Robert Halford | Link to this comment | 09- 5-14 3:51 PM
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13

Thanks, brah.


Posted by: ogged | Link to this comment | 09- 5-14 3:54 PM
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14

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9KJSnd8VzQw


Posted by: bjk | Link to this comment | 09- 5-14 4:19 PM
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15

text, is that you?


Posted by: Turgid Jacobian | Link to this comment | 09- 5-14 5:36 PM
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16

12: And that's why, in general, I like the economist. Not enough to pay for it, though.

I sympathize more with the teddy bear dude as I'm much more likely to take criticism too personally and with no sense of proportion than decide to defend slave owners as unfairly vilified.


Posted by: dalriata | Link to this comment | 09- 5-14 7:04 PM
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Dsquared had The Economist dead to rights.

I tell this anecdote every time the subject comes up on CT, but it's true so I will repeat it again. In a career as a stockbroker, I have met: A Japanese person who reads the Economist every week to find out about the USA and Europe, ignoring the Asian coverage. An American who reads it to keep up with the overseas news, although of course the US coverage is a bit crazy. Numerous Europeans who read it because the American coverage is great, but you have to ignore every word they write about Europe. Personally, I used to read it a very long time ago, while ignoring the awful crap they wrote about Britain and about economics. I stopped, and so, eventually, did everyone else I've mentioned above.

That more or less describes my history with them as well.


Posted by: knecht ruprecht | Link to this comment | 09- 5-14 7:20 PM
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18

I still get it because it's different, at least, than my usual sources. I started reading it when I took a once-an-hour bus to work in the suburbs, and when I missed the bus, it was the only thing at the newsstand that had a chance of keeping me busy until the next bus came.


Posted by: Nathan Williams | Link to this comment | 09- 5-14 8:15 PM
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19

17 does indeed seem perfect, yeah.


Posted by: Thorn | Link to this comment | 09- 5-14 8:57 PM
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20

||
The British accent widely used for High Heroic Fantasy in the movies (Thor, etc); is that a particular accent? A regional one? Learned in first year drama school? Echo of the Christmas panto?
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Posted by: clew | Link to this comment | 09- 6-14 2:17 AM
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Although I am familiar with the dialects of the common people I seldom frequent the talkies, so I can't be of assistance here.


Posted by: Not unduly opinionated Economist writer | Link to this comment | 09- 6-14 4:26 AM
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20: It's mostly a stage accent approximating RP, isn't it? (Except dwarves are Scottish. Dwarves are always Scottish.) This doesn't hold for Game of Thrones which tries, badly and inconsistently, to have different regions of Westeros represented by different regional British accents.


Posted by: dalriata | Link to this comment | 09- 6-14 4:40 AM
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23

When I read that Economist review I confess I found myself idly wondering if McMegan had written it.


Posted by: Gonerill | Link to this comment | 09- 6-14 5:09 AM
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24

I think of it as the Shakespeare accent. Not 100% sure if that's accurate.


Posted by: Minivet | Link to this comment | 09- 6-14 5:49 AM
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25

The actual Shakespeare accent would have been Midlands. Which isn't remotely the RP-type accent people use in movies.


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 09- 6-14 5:57 AM
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26

Oh, you mean the "hither, varlet, and present your scabby buttocks for my attention" voice?


Posted by: Nworb Werdna | Link to this comment | 09- 6-14 6:19 AM
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27

I tell my critical thinking students that The Economist is a great source for tidy, easy to diagram arguments. In general, it is the place to go if you want to see a widely-read publication where everyone writes in the style your college professors want you to write in.


Posted by: rob helpy-chalk | Link to this comment | 09- 6-14 7:16 AM
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28

||
Everybody wake up and amuse me. My 2yo has decided to get his revenge by (1) taking off his diaper all by himself after lights-out (2) pissing the bed (3) giving me the jimmy leg all night in our dry bed and (4) sitting up at 6am and declaiming on his plans for the day, while his breast-feeding mother grumbled into her pillow. Kill me now.
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Posted by: Yawnoc | Link to this comment | 09- 6-14 7:34 AM
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28: Sounds very miserable indeed. Have you read the comments in the second linked article? Highly entertaining if completely insane. I admit it irks me that the viral nature of his insanity might drive up sales of his book... but at least people will know what they're getting.


Posted by: parodie | Link to this comment | 09- 6-14 7:37 AM
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28: It's nap time for 2-year-olds, or at least that's what I just told Selah. She's also had a nap and a walk and watched Pee-Wee's Playhouse AND an episode of Batman, because we're pro-rotting brains when moms want to rest.


Posted by: Thorn | Link to this comment | 09- 6-14 7:37 AM
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30: We're having an unprecedented pre-breakfast Winnie-the-Pooh DVD session, to be sure. The terrorists win.


Posted by: Yawnoc | Link to this comment | 09- 6-14 7:41 AM
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32

From what I can tell from my Crystal, actual Early Modern English is pretty weird to the modern ear, not corresponding to much today at all - Irish English might be the closest.

Also, it would be only at most some Midlands it bears a resemblance to, no? I just browsed a few videos of people demonstrating their Midlands accent (two East, one West) and they were all non-rhotic.


Posted by: Minivet | Link to this comment | 09- 6-14 7:41 AM
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33

I've got no idea what regional accent it maps to, but this is supposed to be Shakespeare in the original pronunciation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gPlpphT7n9s


Posted by: NotIntoBrevity | Link to this comment | 09- 6-14 8:18 AM
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34

The link in 33 is pretty great.


Posted by: Robert Halford | Link to this comment | 09- 6-14 8:57 AM
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35

For example, you learn that "hour" and "whore" rhymed in Shakespeare's English, and both sounded like a pirate's "Arrrr."

In fact, one takeaway from that video was that "talk like a pirate" is mysteriously the closest thing we have to the actual early modern accent.


Posted by: Robert Halford | Link to this comment | 09- 6-14 10:05 AM
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36

I dunno if it's that mysterious. The "pirate" accent is a third hand imitation of an actor imitating an English West Country accent, right?


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 09- 6-14 11:06 AM
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OT: Speaking of reviews, there is a new James Ellroy novel, which the NYTBR assigned to Dennis Lehane, who indulged, in the sole novel of his that I sampled, in so many goddamned clich├ęs in the first forty pages that I resorted to the SkyMall catalogue. Nice work, legacy media.


Posted by: Flippanter | Link to this comment | 09- 6-14 11:13 AM
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38

Urgent bleg! Does anyone have a phone number for SP? Email me at knecht underscore ruprecht at the mail service operated by yahoo dot com.



Posted by: knecht ruprecht | Link to this comment | 09- 6-14 12:00 PM
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25: Shakespeare himself would have had a Warwickshire accent, but presumably he'd have been aware that Henry VIII didn't speak the same way? The actors would for the most part have been Londoners.


Posted by: dsquared | Link to this comment | 09- 6-14 12:06 PM
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40

The earlier you go, the more distinct regional accents should have been, yes?

Taking 36 as a model (Corrnish wrrrekers frrrom Yrrreka, arrrr), High Fantasy Accent is maybe descended from the first actors to convince Hollywood that they were high-falutin'. Pickfair? Traveling repertory? Professional elocutionists?


Posted by: clew | Link to this comment | 09- 6-14 1:13 PM
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Speaking of British accents, DeLong posted this a while back.

I thought it was well done and was impressed that, as an non-brit, I could recognize all of the distinct accents that she was talking about (though chris y was less complementary in the comments -- it's possible that what worked for me would feel much to broad and like a oversimplification to somebody who was already familiar with the accents in question).


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 09- 6-14 1:24 PM
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I remember Crystal suggesting at some point (in either the video or the book) that there was enough intermixing in London for a lot of accents to be current, and encouraged actors he was dialect-training to put something of their own region in their delivery.


Posted by: Minivet | Link to this comment | 09- 6-14 3:08 PM
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43

I remember from college that Canterbury Tales was much easier to understand if you imagined all the characters speaking in a pirate accent.

Thar once were a povra wid'wa, yarrgh.


Posted by: Lambent Cactus | Link to this comment | 09- 6-14 6:33 PM
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