Re: Guest Post - Procrastination

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The car turned off the shining avenue, taking him back to the quiet splendor of his home. His futile hands clenched and relaxed again, folded on his knees. There was nothing left to do.

Wake up, sheeple! It was the iPhones all along!


Posted by: snarkout | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 8:53 AM
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The last 40 years has seen an increase of 250-375% in made up numbers presented as accurate statistics.


Posted by: fake accent | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 8:57 AM
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Improved average quality in procrastination options goes hand in hand with increased procrastination.


Posted by: Eggplant | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 8:58 AM
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UK smartphone users check their phone 221 times a day on average, a recent survey found.

Who says that's procrastination?


Posted by: Ginger Yellow | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 9:16 AM
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It seems like a lot of hand-wringing without evidence that stuff isn't getting done.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 9:24 AM
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To work is human; to procrastinate, divine.


Posted by: MAE | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 9:25 AM
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I'm using my smartphone to multitask. I can't otherwise comment during this conference call because everyone can see my desktop.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 9:26 AM
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Productivity per worker has been rising steadily for decades. If instead of being paid for that increase workers are simply able to procrastinate more - It's not the best trade off but it's better than just being a busy little miserable drone.


Posted by: togolosh | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 9:31 AM
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"I wouldn't say we do it more than we ever have but we talk about it a lot more," says Gray

That seems right.


Posted by: peep | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 9:32 AM
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8 sounds plausible. And reminds me of previous working-hours discussions here, esp. the one about Keynes' 15 hours a week prediction, whether it's been fulfilled and why not.


Posted by: ajay | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 9:45 AM
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8/10: I would venture that fewer people than ever have the option of procrastinating on the job. Our motley band of academics, journalists, and professionals has a degree of autonomy over our workday actions that is becoming ever rarer. Jobs that even a decade or two ago offered substantial scope for goofing off (delivery driver, security guard) are now subject to continuous surveillance and performance monitoring. Growing pink collar occupations like customer service agent are Taylorized to a degree that Carnegie and Ford could only shake their heads at in wonder if they saw it.


Posted by: knecht ruprecht | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 9:56 AM
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Our motley band of academics, journalists, and professionals has a degree of autonomy over our workday actions that is becoming ever rarer.

Fortunately we're also the subject and audience for this sort of media navel-gazing.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 10:01 AM
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Back when I was in a building with security, you could see how they tracked the guards by having them touch a checkpoint on their route. I suppose now it's all RFID tags.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 10:03 AM
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13: I had a night security job like that for a week of one summer at the University of Michigan. It was a like a treasure hunt without any treasure (unless you count the puny paycheck as treasure).


Posted by: peep | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 10:06 AM
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They made you hunt for your check?


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 10:07 AM
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But the crossword puzzle-unfogged substitution is also true for me. I haven't really done a crossword since I started reading here.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 10:16 AM
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This is kind of hilarious, just an update about my friend who has been procrastinating on her tenure packet due Wednesday - she just had a FB status about how she got an email from the NSF, stating that she's the co-PI on a proposal that she had no idea about. (I'm like, SEE EVERYBODY LOVES YOU. She'll be fine.)


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 10:17 AM
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15: Yeah, it was buried around the 50 yard line in Michigan Stadium. There was only one paycheck and usually 10-12 guards working the shift, and so it was a chase to check in at all the secret places on your route and then you ran to the Stadium and looked for your shovel where you hid it and you started digging -- the first time the check had been dug up before I even got to the Stadium. But the last time I dug up the paycheck (almost $50!) and so I decided to retire as champion and took a job as a dishwasher at a bakery.


Posted by: peep | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 10:23 AM
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UK smartphone users check their phone 221 times a day on average

Who are these people? I check my phone like half a dozen times on a good day.


Posted by: Spike | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 10:27 AM
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19: Wasn't there a study showing that the average American teenager sent a text every 10 seconds of their waking life?

So, to answer your question - teenagers.


Posted by: peep | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 10:31 AM
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The bit of the article I found hardest to understand was the thing about Victor Hugo working in the nude to avoid procrastinating. Time was, when working from home, I quite frequently used to work in the nude (well, usually a pair of boxers), and it didn't affect my ability to procrastinate in the least.


Posted by: chris y | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 10:32 AM
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Fortunately we're also the subject and audience for this sort of media navel-gazing.

Yeah, there certainly is an internet class bias toward "people who are in a position to goof off at work."


Posted by: Spike | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 10:33 AM
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Who are these people? I check my phone like half a dozen times on a good day.

...because you're mostly on your computer?


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 10:35 AM
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I would think working in the nude would lead to an excessive number of masturbation breaks.


Posted by: Spike | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 10:37 AM
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No, because you don't need to break. Just masturbate to your progress on your excel spreadsheet.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 10:38 AM
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because you're mostly on your computer?

And British smartphone users aren't? At least not to the extent that it puts a substantial dent in the average?

I want to see the methodology. I bet the real number is, like, 50. With a median significantly lower.


Posted by: Spike | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 10:40 AM
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25: And that's how the grading spreadsheet came to have 5112 rows and 460 columns.


Posted by: torrey pine | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 10:41 AM
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Procrastinate, procrastinate, masturbate, procrastinate.


Posted by: Kreskin | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 10:43 AM
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28: I have to procrastinate for a while after masturbating because I can't for a while.


Posted by: peep | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 10:46 AM
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I find anxiety so unpleasant that I usually am motivated to get stuff done before the anxiety kicks in. (No anxiety looming, though, and the task can drag out for years...)

I think I tend to take on new tasks and responsibilities at just the right rate that, even as I become more and more efficient at doing things, my anxiety remains at around the same level (which is unpleasant but not completely overwhelming).


Posted by: essear | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 10:52 AM
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Raunig, a Thousand Machines

Thus to the modes of existence in abstraction, in diffusity, there also inheres the potential in itself to generate concatenations of singularities instead of identitary and communitary forms of societization. Whereas the French small-holding peasants were not only dispersed, but also in servitude under the old forms of family and village, today new forms of concatenation are to be invented that make use of the diffusity of singularities to desert from machinic enslavement and social subjection: concatenations of chain-less machines connected by the lack of any ties.

The dependency on machines is multiplied through the continual attachment to the machines, the constant mode of being attached to machines. The high art of machinic enslavement interlocks a permanent online life with the imperative of life-long learning and the irresolvable merging of business deals and affects. The screams of desire of the ubiquitous attachments generate new forms of dependency, which make the material penetration of the technical machine into the human body appear as a secondary horror scenario. And yet, the desiring machines are not simply tools of machinic enslavement; the minor advantages of the resistive use of new abstract and diffuse machines in dispersion are by no means always already over-coded.

But even better, or less theoretical, Tertiary Time: The Precariat's Dilemma
Guy Standing, 2013, a pdf paper that I think became part of his book.

"We need to appreciate that time is a basic asset.
Throughout history, class struggle has been about the redistribution of the assets that are vital to the good life of the era, largely defined in terms set by the dominant social formation.

The inequality of control over time is the premise of this essay. To appreciate how the inequality is evolving, and how the emerging precariat is particularly hard hit, we need first to remind ourselves of how public and private perceptions of work have been manipulated through the ages, to the point where an ideological hegemony mocks our imagination"
...
When I say post-capitalism wants and maybe already has everything, I mean fucking everything inside and outside, 24/7/365.


Posted by: bob mcmanus | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 10:54 AM
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You people are so weak. I have the ability to let anxiety build for years, often indefinitely, without acting on it.


Posted by: Eggplant | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 10:55 AM
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I've had a procrastination problem for as long as I've had work to do. It's changed over the years, though, as each form of procrastination gets wiped out by something even more addictive. So far the progression has been: reading novels -> surfing the web -> unfogged -> con/tra dance. I'm sort of hoping there isn't another stage after this one.


Posted by: torrey pine | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 10:59 AM
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And British smartphone users aren't? At least not to the extent that it puts a substantial dent in the average?

No, I'm just saying the people that are checking their phones enough to bring up the average are the ones who are using it like a PC. I check my phone way more on the days when I'm ferrying kids around and watching them at their swim lesson or whatever, but it's just fungibility.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 10:59 AM
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Hey, what do you know. That 221 number comes from a survey commissioned by a Smartphone app developer. And looking at there data, I still can't figure out where 221 comes from. It appears to be a load of bollocks.


Posted by: Spike | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 11:02 AM
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On another call. I'm to enter my code and press the "pound or hash key". Last time I did this, it was just the "pound key". I blame Twitter.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 11:02 AM
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Why don't we call it the number sign?


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 11:03 AM
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35: I love, in that link, how the author is shocked that we start in on our phones very early and stay on them very late at night, because obviously those are the exact same users.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 11:04 AM
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con/tra dance

"Swing your partner 'round real smart. Up-Up-Down-Down-Left-Right-Left-Right B, A, Start."


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 11:05 AM
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I laughed at 39.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 11:06 AM
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17 she just had a FB status about how she got an email from the NSF, stating that she's the co-PI on a proposal that she had no idea about

That's... a bit of an ethics problem, isn't it? Shouldn't she be tearing her newfound co-PI a new one?


Posted by: essear | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 11:08 AM
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35: Oh, pshaw. That's not 221 times checking you're phone, that's 221 tasks. That's nothing. I bet I do 18-20 just in the ten minutes it takes me to go downstairs and get lunch sometimes.

Walking to elevator: refresh Twitter
In elevator: read link on Twitter
Downstairs: Retweet link
Walking to sandwich shop: Refresh work e-mail
Respond to text from my intern
Refresh personal e-mail
Go back to Twitter
Refresh weather page
Waiting for sandwich: take photo of absurd sign
Text photo to my sister
Respond to next text from intern

etc.

Really, not hard at all. I bet I get to 221 times just in my to/from commute to work on the train (25 minutes each way), assuming I am on my phone and not marking up a report or working on my laptop.


Posted by: Witt | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 11:08 AM
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your! your! your! My kingdom for an edit button.


Posted by: Witt | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 11:09 AM
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Is this a thing where she submitted a letter of support saying that she would help out if needed because of her greater expertise in something or other, and it turned into co-PI status?


Posted by: Cryptic ned | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 11:09 AM
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41: I'm guessing it's a project that she'd verbally agreed to, or was already overlapping with to such an extent that it was assumed that she was in, and the other person just went and wrote the proposal on their own?


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 11:10 AM
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Ok, I think I figured out their 221 number. What they do is get people to estimate how many times they do an action in a day. So they get people to estimate how many times they use their smart phone to "Check trains".... the average nubmer of time people use their smartphone to check trains is apparently 1.4. However, if you exclude the 72.55% of people who report never using their phone to check trains, the average number is 5.08 times per day.

So, they collect these bullshit inflated numbers for ever category ("Check Flights" - 6.08 times per day, "Maps" - 4.14 times per day, "Food shop app", 5.68 times per day.) And they add all those numbers together and get 219.23. Which, naturally, rounds up to 221.


Posted by: Spike | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 11:14 AM
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The long-overdue reaction against being completely overwhelmed blog called "Permanent Crisis", one I have looked at before, but this was found by searching "Neoliberalism and time" Three parts, 2 looks best

"But he scrambles back from the precipice and into the reassuring arms of neoliberal doctrine: it's your own fault."

Rule number one of Vampire Castle: Personalize everything, turn every structural or systemic problem into a individual vice or virtue or idiosyncratic moral narrative

"When a particular kind of behavior or experience becomes socially general, we can be sure it's not because of personal idiosyncrasy on a mass scale--which is an oxymoron. Rather, something about society itself is causing that behavior to proliferate.

Today time stress is not simply widespread--it's hegemonic." ...Permanent Crisis


Posted by: bob mcmanus | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 11:14 AM
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OT:

What do the lawyers in the crowd make of the current Supreme Court case suing Amazon's warehouse management company for payment of overtime for the security check lines they must go through?

The Amazon warehouse subcontractor is Integrity Staffing, and the US government is arguing on their behalf, against any such compensation. This ... bothers me.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 11:17 AM
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My favorite line in those Supreme Court arguments was John Roberts saying "well, why don't these workers just use their collective bargaining power to ensure they get paid for the extra time?" That was some impressive disingenuous bastardism.


Posted by: Spike | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 11:22 AM
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OT:us-nurse-infected-with-ebola-may-have-broke-protoco

Yeah, lets fucking hope so. Or bad hazmat suit. Or I don't give a fuck, this ain't West Africa, and this is very bad news. State-of-art teaching hospital who knew what they were dealing with and got all infected up anyway? Fuck me in Dallas.

"Hospital officials said the employee had worn full protective clothing during all contact with Duncan. Dr Tom Frieden, the CDC director, warned in a media briefing on Sunday that other hospital staff could also have been exposed to the virus and may show symptoms in the coming days."


Posted by: bob mcmanus | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 11:35 AM
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Yeah, we probably need to quarantine Texas. Maybe build a fence or something.


Posted by: Spike | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 11:45 AM
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I can't imagine anyone here being hesitant to head to a hospital if they've got flu-like symptoms.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 11:47 AM
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I'd bet that nearly everybody is as good at ignoring symptoms as they were a month ago.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 11:48 AM
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There does seem to be a worrisome contradiction between all the assurances that Ebola is hard to transmit and the repeated infection of various medical personnel.


Posted by: Eggplant | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 11:49 AM
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48, 49: I just don't get why the obvious answer here isn't that checking out through a security line is part of the job. Many, many years ago, I worked as a check-out clerk in a department store, which involved checking in and out with the cash from the cash drawer -- count it going in, count it going out -- and that part of the procedure was assuredly on the clock, not off it. Essentially, you spent 15 minutes at the beginning the day with the check-in procedure, and 15 minutes at the end checking out, and this was part of your 8-hour shift, not extraneous to it.

This from the link in 48 is interesting:

Eisenbrey also called it "shameful" that the White House was siding with Integrity Staffing--he suspects, because the administration "doesn't want to be sued" for wage violations in its own agencies.

Really, would that be why? I assume that government staffpeople are on salary. Workers in an Amazon warehouse are not. That makes a big difference.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 11:50 AM
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I just don't get why the obvious answer here isn't that checking out through a security line is part of the job.

Yeah, if you can get fired for not doing it, you need to be paid for doing it.


Posted by: Spike | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 11:52 AM
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54: Not really: if you're not in close physical contact with someone with Ebola, it's hard to transmit. if you are, it's easier. Not hard to understand.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 11:53 AM
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Yeah, I can't comprehend how there can be debate over whether something is "integral and indispensable" when presumably an employee would get fired for refusing to do it.

55: I think there are a lot of federal employees who either make wages or have overtime pay in their contracts. And then there are all the contractors - a quote in the article specifically mentions contractors who work with classified material.


Posted by: Minivet | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 11:54 AM
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If there is a significant outbreak of ebola in the US in the next three weeks, how does that effect the election? Does it help Team "People Should Have Access to Health Care" or Team "Brown People Are Scary"?


Posted by: Spike | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 11:58 AM
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56: Well put. I suppose the countering argument is that you have to commute to work, after all, and you'd be fired for not doing that, yet you needn't be paid for that.

This is why I asked whether the lawyers in the band have any thoughts: it strikes me as a matter of contract law. When you accept a position, a job, you are agreeing that you'll actually show up -- which entails commuting to the site. So the question turns on whether any check-in and check-out procedures fall under "shows up clean" (without contraband) before beginning and ending work, as opposed to simply "shows up".


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 12:01 PM
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Team BPAS, easy. Team PSHAtHC have a harder, less primal argument, and, as far as I know, they are congenitally incapable of demonizing the opposition, even for legitimate reasons like underfunding public health.


Posted by: Eggplant | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 12:01 PM
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I don't know quite what the point of 50 is, but fuck off anyway. Note that none of the dozens of people in social and family contact with the infected person has gotten infected. Only a nurse who probably was involved in intubating the patient, a dangerous procedure which probably shouldn't be done in this situation. Think about it... you create MORE opportunity for infected bodily fluids to be released, by doing invasive procedures.

Also, since nobody uses this highly cumbersome and hot personal protective equipment normally, people are likely to make mistakes with it.

Read this and then go to the Eli Perincevich blog.


Posted by: Cryptic ned | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 12:02 PM
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61 is right. The outbreak is Ebama's fault!


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 12:02 PM
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54: Their gear is non-trivial to wear. Taking it off properly requires practice. They really should have sent the patient to one of the medical centers best equipped to deal with it. Staff at other places drills hard on these protocols.
62: People DO wear kit like that routinely, just not there. It's irresponsible to put staff at risk like that.


Posted by: ydnew | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 12:05 PM
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62: Note that none of the dozens of people in social and family contact with the infected person has gotten infected.

Yeah, I've been really surprised, in a good way, about this. I was worried, sad, about the original patient's family, esp. his girlfriend who was sharing a bed with him. I still keep expecting to hear that the family is sick. I hope they're okay.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 12:08 PM
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You have to put up the signs saying "Do Not Remove Gloves With Your Teeth Unless You Rinse With Mouthwash Afterward."


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 12:20 PM
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Ebola isn't worth worrying about unless you are poor and live in West Africa or are a healthcare worker working with Ebola patients.

I have a conference (in Nawlins! yay Cajun food!) in a couple of weeks that a friend of mine is going to drive to from DC rather than risk getting Ebola on the plane. I did not point and laugh when he told me this merely because he's likely to be PI on a project I hope to work on.


Posted by: togolosh | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 12:44 PM
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One last thought on the Amazon thing: the defense's chief argument is that

The company's essential argument is that responsibility to compensate these workers should depend on whether the post-work tasks are "integral and indispensable" to their primary duties.

Where is "integral and indispensable" coming from? Is it statutory? Note that this appears to be an inclusive "and" -- that is, the task must be both of these things, not just one or the other. In the case of the Amazon workers, it's arguable that the task is indispensable though not integral.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 12:44 PM
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From a link in the FDL thread, a Dkos diary on protection level. As always, do read the comments, which go into more details.

CDC-recommendations-are-going-to-kill-health-care-workers

Two-thirds down:

"Ebola is absolutely a BSL 4 pathogen. I have no idea where you are getting your info but it is completely wrong.

BSL 4 is for aerosol transmitted disease AND diseases that have a high risk of fatality with no known cures.

I worked in a BSL 3 lab for about 3 years doing my graduate work. Im quite familiar with the levels."


Posted by: bob mcmanus | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 12:47 PM
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This would be the way in to trashing the defense's argument: fuck your indispensable, if it's not integral, that's enough.

I mean, what's next, mandating drug testing, off the clock, before work ensues? (I believe some workers are required to undergo drug testing off the clock as it stands.) This stuff makes me angry, somehow.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 12:48 PM
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60: It's not an issue of contract. If there's a written contract or employee handbook, it makes it clear that employees don't get paid for this time. If there's no written contract, they tell the employees on the first day that they don't get paid for this time, so there's a clear oral contract.

The legal issue is whether the minimum wage laws override the contract. That gets you to the boring aspects of federal regulations about what does and does not count as work time for getting overtime.

Lots of blue collar and pink collar federal employees are entitled to overtime, and it's very common for employees to have to go through security checks if they're anywhere near classified documents. the feds also often indemnify contractors. So it would have a significant cost to teh federal government.

Disclaimer: my firm represents employees in class actions like this one frequently, but we're not involved in this particular one.


Posted by: unimaginative | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 12:51 PM
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I just don't get why the obvious answer here isn't that checking out through a security line is part of the job.

Because US labor law is extremely employer-friendly? More sepcifically in this case, the statute is a mess, and draws a distinction between things like "the principal activity or activities" an employee is employeed to provide, and "activities which are preliminary to or postliminary to said principal activity". The Portal-to-Portal Act (which enacted that distinction) was passed in response to an old line of Supreme Court cases that interpreted then-existing federal law to require, e.g., payment for all the "preliminary" activities of pottery workers (putting on overalls, etc.)--Congress didn't like that, and changed the law to make sure that kind of stuff didn't have to be paid.

The "integral and indispensible" stuff is from the caselaw interpreting the Portal-to-Portal Act. I don't know the caselaw very well, but my understanding is that in this context it means something different than "you'll be fired if you don't do it"--it refers to things that are directly necessary to the principal productive activity, not just made "necessary" by arbitrary employer requiremet. (Which is not, of course, to say that that makes any sense.)


Posted by: potchkeh | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 1:00 PM
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71: The legal issue is whether the minimum wage laws override the contract.

I see. Thanks. I'm gathering that the minimum wage laws include provisions regarding maximum daily or weekly hours before overtime kicks in, mandated number of breaks during the day (15 minutes for every 4 hours worked, I think), and so on. I didn't realize those laws were part of minimum wage laws.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 1:08 PM
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The basic law is time-and-a-half for all hours beyond 40. There's a category of "exempt" workers who aren't entitled to overtime, more or less what we think of of as management or professionals (doctors and lawyers are professionals, but not necessarily managers, and aren't legally entitled to overtime).

In this case, the employees who worked less than 40 hours a week argue that they should be entitled to straight time for time waiting on line for security.


Posted by: unimaginative | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 1:14 PM
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The basic law is time-and-a-half for all hours beyond 40. There's a category of "exempt" workers who aren't entitled to overtime, more or less what we think of of as management or professionals (doctors and lawyers are professionals, but not necessarily managers, and aren't legally entitled to overtime).

In this case, the employees who worked less than 40 hours a week argue that they should be entitled to straight time for time waiting on line for security.


Posted by: unimaginative | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 1:14 PM
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It's been pointed out, in any case, that Amazon has a problem on its hands if its subcontractor can't absorb the cost of assuming a 7.5 hour work day (with half an hour for security check-out, paid). I don't see any way past the conclusion that we're looking at an immoral business model.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 1:23 PM
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I bet Ebola workers get paid for the time getting in and out of their Ebola-protection suits.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 1:33 PM
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Depends on if they're full-time hospital employees or contractors brought in by a staffing agency.


Posted by: Tom Scudder | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 1:35 PM
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Right winger in my feed posted another stupid link about Ebola, one point of which is that the US patented Ebola so obviously they're behind it, look, read the patent right here! I didn't have the energy to explain the difference between an application and a patent (it's the former, never issued), the reasons you'd want to patent genes or proteins from an organism (vaccines, diagnostics), or the details of the Myriad decision that says that such patents are now invalid. I just come here to complain instead.


Posted by: SP | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 1:59 PM
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76.last: Ya. Amazon is infamous for fucking over it's warehouse workers.

75: And 'exempt' workers include things like the manager of a fast food restaurant who may well spend 8 hours working the register at ten bucks an hour before taking up the rest of her duties for free as I understand it.


Posted by: togolosh | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 2:01 PM
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a friend of mine is going to drive to from DC rather than risk getting Ebola on the plane. I did not point and laugh when he told me this merely because he's likely to be PI on a project I hope to work on.

Wow.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 2:04 PM
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80.2: That sounds illegal.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 2:26 PM
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The Ebola stuff is weird. On the one hand, I'm spending a fair bit of time calming people down -- mostly outside my organization, to be clear. On the other, several reporters have asked me worriedly what kind of backlash local immigrants are getting and so far the answer is really "not much, if any."

Not far from here is Duffy's Cut, which was long thought to be a grave/memorial for Irish railroad workers killed by cholera. Recent research suggests that it is indeed a grave, but some of the workers may have been murdered by their terrified, anti-Catholic, anti-immigrant neighbors. So maybe we've progressed.


Posted by: Witt | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 2:27 PM
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45: Based on my own experience with NSF, there's a fair bit of paperwork you have to submit in order to be on official co-PI (as opposed to just some person who wrote a letter of support). I'm not sure how I could end up as co-PI on a grant without knowing about it.


Posted by: AcademicLurker | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 2:27 PM
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Not far from here is Duffy's Cut, which was long thought to be a grave/memorial for Irish railroad workers killed by cholera.

I learned about that story somewhat recently from a powerful song from Christy Moore .


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 2:52 PM
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72. Thanks for introducing me to a new word. "Postliminary": really?


Posted by: DaveLMA | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 4:24 PM
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Thanks for that song, NickS.


Posted by: Penny | Link to this comment | 10-13-14 8:48 PM
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