did someone muck with the backend here

Re: So Many Years

1

Poor Betty White, reduced to idiocy by all those hours hand-slicing bread.


Posted by: Mossy Character | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 11:06 AM
horizontal rule
2

When you use a celebrity's name as metonym for a point in history, it feels like a cheat to be referring to their birthdate when the career they're known for started much later. Technically true, but that's all.


Posted by: Minivet | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 11:07 AM
horizontal rule
3

2 would have prevented me from making a cruel joke in 1, so I'm ignoring it.


Posted by: Mossy Character | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 11:09 AM
horizontal rule
4

Both Oxford and Tenochtitlán produced many people who didn't like Spaniards.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 11:16 AM
horizontal rule
5

But Chomper and Spike were friends.


Posted by: peep | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 11:17 AM
horizontal rule
6

The Mammoth thing is kind of nonsense. I think he's talking about the tiny survivor populations of mammoths that lived on Wrangel Island or St. Paul Island. Feels like cheating. Sure there were a few mammoths existing in the world but it's not like there were herds moving down La Brea Ave when the pyramids were being built.

I tell my kid the stegosaurus/T.Rex thing all the time, to the point where my daughter pulled an "everyone KNOWS that ALREADY" the last time we were at the natural history museum.


Posted by: Robert Halford | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 11:19 AM
horizontal rule
7

I think it was mentioned in Jurassic Park.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 11:20 AM
horizontal rule
8

5: Is that Land Before Time?


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 11:20 AM
horizontal rule
9

but it's not like there were herds moving down La Brea Ave when the pyramids were being built

Even then there were traffic jams in LA.


Posted by: peep | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 11:21 AM
horizontal rule
10

8: Yes!


Posted by: peep | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 11:22 AM
horizontal rule
11

Dinosaur Train is good for teaching kids about how far apart in time different dinosaurs were separated. It's less good for teaching kids about how trains work.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 11:22 AM
horizontal rule
12

Lake Placid is good for exposing children to Betty White.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 11:23 AM
horizontal rule
13

Sure, there were only a few mammoths on the one island, but there are only a few pyramids on one narrow stretch over riverbank and nobody ever says they don't count.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 11:33 AM
horizontal rule
14

5 Chopper and Spike?


Posted by: Barry Freed | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 11:44 AM
horizontal rule
15

My stepdaughter is making me correct 10. Chomper did not appear in the original Land Before Time movie. His first appearance was in the sequel The Land Before Time II: The Great Valley Adventure.


Posted by: peep | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 11:51 AM
horizontal rule
16

Yes, the find the valley and don't get eaten by the sharp tooths.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 11:52 AM
horizontal rule
17

Anyway, 6 is wrong.

The Egyptians used the mammoths to carry the stones for the pyramids. When the Hebrews escaped they rode on the mammoths across the Red Sea. But then the mammoths died during the 40 years in the desert, and that's why they are extinct.

The End


Posted by: peep | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 11:57 AM
horizontal rule
18

*tears up childhood drawings of anachronistic dinosaur battles in disgust*


Posted by: Eggplant | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 12:01 PM
horizontal rule
19

*tears up childhood drawings of anachronistic Golden Girls scenes in disgust*


Posted by: Eggplant | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 12:11 PM
horizontal rule
20

"Blanche dates an Oxford don"?


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 12:17 PM
horizontal rule
21

"Blanche dates a Stegosaurus"


Posted by: Robert Halford | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 12:20 PM
horizontal rule
22

Can anyone name the last dinosaur to get an Oxford degree?


Posted by: AcademicLurker | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 12:22 PM
horizontal rule
23

There are the same number of years between the invention of sound recording and the release of "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" as there are years between SPLHCB and today, but only because 2017 feels like the equivalent of forty years.


Posted by: Todd | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 12:28 PM
horizontal rule
24

Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band is the midpoint between today and the Russian Revolution. Which, on further thought, feels exactly correct.


Posted by: dalriata | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 1:40 PM
horizontal rule
25

Is the temporal distance between today and the day offed posted nearly the same exact post greater or less than the distance between that post and the beginning of the blog? I say greater and also greater than the statute of limitations for reposting. And also that is not a standard I want to start invoking. And also it might not have been Ogged but I know we've had this sort of list before.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 1:45 PM
horizontal rule
26

Offed, for pete's sake, was not supposed to be thus.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 1:47 PM
horizontal rule
27

Today is the day in back to the future when it all started in 1985.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 1:47 PM
horizontal rule
28

Cleopatra went to Oxford, but only halfway.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 1:48 PM
horizontal rule
29

23.last: We will only be able to correctly calculate the Trump year to regular year after he is out of office.


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 2:29 PM
horizontal rule
30

I like to play this game with nostalgia pix -- e.g. "Dazed and Confused" came out 17 years after the events it depicts -- it's now been 24 years since the film was released. Even more so: "American Graffiti" was filmed only 10 years after the events it depicts, and it's been 44 years since its release.


Posted by: Natilo Paennim | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 2:37 PM
horizontal rule
31

30: That reminds me of "Singles" and "Reality Bites", which I see as attempts at instant nostalgia. "Period pieces" before the period in question was even over.


Posted by: AcademicLurker | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 2:41 PM
horizontal rule
32

22: Niall Ferguson?


Posted by: essear | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 3:00 PM
horizontal rule
33

30: We are now as far from "1941" as "1941" was from 1941.


Posted by: Cryptic ned | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 3:29 PM
horizontal rule
34

That's a good one.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 3:32 PM
horizontal rule
35

That's a good one.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 3:32 PM
horizontal rule
36

Not that good.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 3:36 PM
horizontal rule
37

We can periodically monitor the age of the blog by noting things its founding is half as old as. This year, it looks to be the fall of the Berlin Wall.


Posted by: Minivet | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 4:08 PM
horizontal rule
38

Lawrence of Arabia and Dr. Zhivago movies both closer to the events depicted than to today.


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 11-22-17 5:40 PM
horizontal rule
39

38: see this chart... https://xkcd.com/1491/ Also the Iliad, the Wonder Years and the Big Lebowski.


Posted by: ajay | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 4:40 AM
horizontal rule
40

Oxford University is older than the founding of the Aztec Capitol of Tenochtitlán.

This is actually a really important one to remember. Westerners tend to have the mistaken idea that historical events of this sort only happen in Western countries, and that everywhere else is unchanging. "There are Maori in New Zealand, there have always been Maori in New Zealand"; but in fact the Maori landings are more recent than the Norman Conquest. See also the Zulu in South Africa, who post-date Europeans in North America by several centuries.


Posted by: ajay | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 5:16 AM
horizontal rule
41

Thanks. The one the sticks out for me is Gunsmoke approaching the closer to the time depicted than now line (however, start of series presumably).


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 5:16 AM
horizontal rule
42

The one that sticks out for me is "I Love the 90s" being right next to "Hotel Rwanda" which suggests an unfortunate crossover.


Posted by: ajay | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 5:21 AM
horizontal rule
43

||
Has no one noticed the medical discovery of the year: that it's not just masturbation that can make you go blind?
|>


Posted by: NW | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 6:04 AM
horizontal rule
44

40 last: Not sure I read you rightly, but the predecessors of the Zulu were in present-day SA by probably the 17th C, no-one's really sure. Ethnogenesis of the Zulu as we know them was early 19th C, but the people were already there.


Posted by: Mossy Character | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 6:24 AM
horizontal rule
45

44: yes.


Posted by: ajay | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 6:46 AM
horizontal rule
46

43 Figure 2 is everything.


Posted by: Barry Freed | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 6:59 AM
horizontal rule
47

Africa in particular suffers from everyone thinking it is unchanging from the Garden of Eden days until the colonial era.


Posted by: Walt Someguy | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 7:02 AM
horizontal rule
48

Moved by 44, I looked up the Zulus' history and found out about the Mfecane, which I hadn't heard of before but which sounds terrible.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mfecane


Posted by: ajay | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 7:09 AM
horizontal rule
49

48: I just read the same thing. History is bad.


Posted by: Walt Someguy | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 7:12 AM
horizontal rule
50

48: The historiography of the Mfecane is a shitshow, massively politicized by all sides with next to no evidence to work with. Suffice to say, it probably wasn't all that apocalyptic.


Posted by: Mossy Character | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 7:13 AM
horizontal rule
51

No one's ever actually found a document signed by Shaka giving orders for it, right?


Posted by: ajay | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 7:18 AM
horizontal rule
52

If you're all taking that headline 1-2m dead from the wiki intro, take a look at the sources. The most recent secondary source is 43 years old.


Posted by: Mossy Character | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 7:20 AM
horizontal rule
53

In case 51 isn't a joke: lots of horrible shit definitely happened, but that's about the limit of our knowledge.


Posted by: Mossy Character | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 7:22 AM
horizontal rule
54

52: The most recent secondary source is 43 years old.

J.D. Omer-Cooper, The Zulu Aftermath: A Nineteenth-Century Revolution in Bantu Africa, Longmans, 1978: ISBN 0-582-64531-X; outstanding example of the traditional view.
Norman Etherington, The Great Treks: The Transformation of Southern Africa, 1815-1854, Longman, 2001: ISBN 0-582-31567-0; refutes accounts of the Mfecane
Carolyn Hamilton, The Mfecane Aftermath: Reconstructive Debates in Southern African History, Indiana University Press, 1995: ISBN 1-86814-252-3

Unless you're writing from the year 2044...


Posted by: ajay | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 7:29 AM
horizontal rule
55

Interesting (my prior knowledge of this issue before clicking on Wikipedia was literally zero). It seems odd that something so purportedly big and close in time and place to recorded history would be so opaque. Weren't there lots of survivors around to have oral histories taken down by the 1870s-1890s? And nearby Europeans in Angola and the Cape writing stuff down?


Posted by: Robert Halford | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 7:33 AM
horizontal rule
56

54: I was referring to the sources for that particular claim in the intro. Notes 2, 3, 4, 5. In which the youngest secondary source is actually 48 years old; and I'd wager that source is in fact tertiary, pushing the youngest back to 1839.


Posted by: Mossy Character | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 7:36 AM
horizontal rule
57

55: There were Europeans closer than that, at what are now Durban and Maputo, plus a handful of travelers in the interior, and at least some oral accounts were taken; AFAIK those are the bases of all the narrative accounts. But all that evidence tells us for sure is that horrible shit happened and people moved long distances. Casualty estimates based on decades-old oral testimony recorded more than 100 years ago are about as conclusive as one would expect.


Posted by: Mossy Character | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 7:43 AM
horizontal rule
58

Seriously just look over the notes in that wiki article. Most of the narrative is being taken from the Cambridge History of Africa, 1977.


Posted by: Mossy Character | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 7:51 AM
horizontal rule
59

You can infer the history of Africa from a single drop of a university press history.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 7:55 AM
horizontal rule
60

For comparison, take the Thirty Years' War. In the (politicized) 19th century historiography you have these massive figures thrown around, 50-75% of Germany dying. In the 20th century historians start looking, at censuses, tax records, toll records, parish registers, everything. After decades of hard digging they figure maybe 20-30% dead, with massive local variation and huge blank spaces of ignorance. For the Mfecane none of those sources ever even existed.


Posted by: Mossy Character | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 8:02 AM
horizontal rule
61

Was the 1977 Cambridge History of Africa famously wrong about African history?


Posted by: ajay | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 8:05 AM
horizontal rule
62

60: granted. I'm not sure in that case where you are coming from with the "Suffice to say, it probably wasn't all that apocalyptic" thing.

It sounds like "Suffice to say, it was bad but because of the lack of documentation we have no idea whether 1 million is accurate, too high or even too low" would be more correct.


Posted by: ajay | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 8:07 AM
horizontal rule
63

61: I've no idea; just pointing out that wikihistory has to be treated very cautiously. How seriously would you take such an old history in your area of expertise?*
62.2 is fair; but one must add that most of the historians who have ever worked the problem, plus most of their few eyewitnesses, had strong motivations for exaggerating the carnage.
*TBC, this is not my area of expertise.


Posted by: Mossy Character | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 8:14 AM
horizontal rule
64

There's an interesting paper which points out the coincidence with the 1815 Tambora eruption, which is likely to have caused widespread deaths of humans and livestock.


Posted by: ajay | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 8:15 AM
horizontal rule
65

That's why I don't keep my livestock in a volcano.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 8:17 AM
horizontal rule
66

(looks into crater)
Then whose livestock are these?


Posted by: ajay | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 8:18 AM
horizontal rule
67

Just one more: the intro to a book on Shaka I didn't go on to read was titled "The buttocks problem." The problem was this: what did Shaka's ass look like? Some testimony, given by people who were old enough to have seen him, indicates that his ass was tight, muscular, and athletic, as befitted a great conquering warrior king. Other testimony, just as reliable, indicates that his ass was large, wobbly and very well-fed, as befitted a great conquering warrior king. The accounts are irreconcilable. WRT narrative details in particular, that same problem crops up for just about everything. It isn't certain whether some famous battles ever actually happened, for instance. I expect the Cambridge writers did the best they could, but the best they could is basically folklore, not history.


Posted by: Mossy Character | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 8:22 AM
horizontal rule
68

64 is interesting and plausible.


Posted by: Mossy Character | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 8:23 AM
horizontal rule
69

The ass changed over the course of its life.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 8:26 AM
horizontal rule
70

69: So one would think; but apparently the witnesses claimed to be describing the ass at much the same age.


Posted by: Mossy Character | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 8:29 AM
horizontal rule
71

67 is great. That was the intro? As in "first of all, we clearly need to address the Gluteal Question".

The accounts are irreconcilable.

It's as though he... got fatter.


Posted by: ajay | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 8:30 AM
horizontal rule
72

71 crossed with 70.


Posted by: ajay | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 8:31 AM
horizontal rule
73

Can one ever truly know a historical butt?


Posted by: Robert Halford | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 8:32 AM
horizontal rule
74

Possibly the witnesses had different criteria for what constitutes a great ass. It's not like it's an objective quality like the number of legs he had.


Posted by: ajay | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 8:32 AM
horizontal rule
75

I believe in the excellent 1980s TV miniseries "Shaka Zulu," until today my main source of information about Shaka Zulu, Shaka had a nice firm butt.


Posted by: Robert Halford | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 8:35 AM
horizontal rule
76

If we develop a butt-assessment scale, the unit of measurement is the Franken.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 8:37 AM
horizontal rule
77

I SCORN THE PUNY SEMITIC FRANKEN SCALE.


Posted by: OPINIONATED HERMAN GÖRING | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 8:44 AM
horizontal rule
78

71.1: The point was to illustrate the scantiness of the evidence.


Posted by: Mossy Character | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 8:45 AM
horizontal rule
79

Little known fact: it was the buttock problem that caused the breakdown of the bicameral mind.


Posted by: Walt Someguy | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 8:52 AM
horizontal rule
80

Das Gesassproblem.


Posted by: ajay | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 8:59 AM
horizontal rule
81

On thanksgiving in New Mexico, the The indigenous Hispanics commemorate their first meal with the Anglo invaders. The indigenous Navajo commemorate their first meal with the Spanish invaders. The indigenous Hopi commemorate their first meal with the Navajo invaders.

Apologies to Teo, who can back a few more invasions.


Posted by: Unimaginative | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 8:59 AM
horizontal rule
82

***ACTUAL SEX GROTTO***

Turns out to be considerably less fun than previously assumed.

http://www.plymouthherald.co.uk/news/plymouth-news/how-sordid-sex-dungeon-torture-818487


Posted by: Alex | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 9:03 AM
horizontal rule
83

Where I live it's Mexicans -- South Asians -- South Carolina African Americans -- Philadelphia Italians -- English -- Swedes -- Lenni Lenape


Posted by: Unimaginative | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 9:06 AM
horizontal rule
84

I'm going to wikipedia. Going to learn some African history. Just kidding, I'm white!


Posted by: Landed Yet | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 9:07 AM
horizontal rule
85

83: I had great difficulty working out which way 83 was supposed to run, mainly because I didn't know who Lenni Lenape was and thought it might be either a Native American tribe (in which case right to left) or some sort of whimsical band (in which case left to right).


Posted by: ajay | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 9:09 AM
horizontal rule
86

My outside bet was that Lenni Lenape was a Bundesliga midfielder in the late 1970s.


Posted by: ajay | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 9:12 AM
horizontal rule
87

My wife showed me an ad a black guy put up offering to be your date for Thanksgiving with your racist white Trump-supporting family, for money. It came with a sliding scale depending on how obnoxious you wanted him to be. I think having him bitch endlessly about Bud Light costs $15.


Posted by: Walt Someguy | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 9:16 AM
horizontal rule
88

There's good wine today. I'm waiting for one o'clock when it's legal to start.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 9:18 AM
horizontal rule
89

The big ponderosa behind my house was more than a sapling when Salish families gathered berries along the creek below. Still a sapling, probably, when that group of Hudson's Bay Company trappers (including at least one Hawaiian) was waylayed by Blackfeet a couple of drainages to the west.


Posted by: CharleyCarp | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 9:21 AM
horizontal rule
90

87 is great. I'd totally do that if I were back in NY.


Posted by: Barry Freed | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 9:21 AM
horizontal rule
91

89.last That's a story I'd like to here more of.


Posted by: Barry Freed | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 9:23 AM
horizontal rule
92

The cliche I have just worked into something I am writing dates back to 1719


Posted by: NW | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 9:26 AM
horizontal rule
93

91 to 92.


Posted by: Mossy Character | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 9:29 AM
horizontal rule
94

87 is, indeed, fantastic.


Posted by: Alex | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 9:30 AM
horizontal rule
95

94 -- Especially if Barry did it with a man as his date


Posted by: NW | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 9:40 AM
horizontal rule
96

Here's the ad.


Posted by: Walt Someguy | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 9:45 AM
horizontal rule
97

95 Totally.


Posted by: Barry Freed | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 9:50 AM
horizontal rule
98

An excerpt from our local paper:

Neil MacArthur was a Hudson Bay company factor who afterward went into trading for himself on the old emigrant road. He was in charge of one of the old Hudson Bay "brigades" which had been an expedition from the post to an Indian camp down near where Frenchtown is. He had had a successful trading season and was returning to the post over the old trail. One of his men was a Kanaka, named Koriaka, and this man rode the bell mare at the head of the line. In the canyon, as the "brigade" was returning to the post, it was waylaid by a war party of Blackfeet in the little gulch where the Marent trestle is built. The ambush was not a success, as the Blackfeet did not wait for the main body of the "brigade," but shot Koriaka as he came into sight on the trail. The following line at once fell back, rallied and drove back the hostiles. There was no other life lost than that of the poor Kanaka and the canyon was given his name. The old Indian name seems to have been entirely lost; whatever it was, it was superseded by the name "Koriaka 's canyon" . . .

Here's a map: https://www.roadonmap.com/us/where-is/Coriacan_Defile-Missoula_MT,gap


Posted by: CharleyCarp | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 10:05 AM
horizontal rule
99

If you switch the map to satellite, and blow it up enough, you can see the shadows of the trestle, where the ambush took place. Down near the bottom of the canyon.


Posted by: CharleyCarp | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 10:11 AM
horizontal rule
100

Very cool


Posted by: Barry Freed | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 10:15 AM
horizontal rule
101

This is the "post" to which they were returning: http://fortwiki.com/Fort_Connah


Posted by: CharleyCarp | Link to this comment | 11-23-17 10:26 AM
horizontal rule
102

My wife showed me an ad a black guy put up offering to be your date for Thanksgiving with your racist white Trump-supporting family, for money. It came with a sliding scale depending on how obnoxious you wanted him to be. I think having him bitch endlessly about Bud Light costs $15.

Clearly he hasn't watched Get Out.


Posted by: Ginger Yellow | Link to this comment | 11-24-17 5:19 AM
horizontal rule
103

I really enjoyed the short story where Galileo went to teach at Harvard.


Posted by: Yoyo | Link to this comment | 11-24-17 1:54 PM
horizontal rule
104

Hey, here's a good fact in the vein of the OP: a ship built by the German Imperial Navy in 1913 for use in German East Africa, and which saw battle against the British, is currently in service as a passenger ferry on the same Lake Tanganikya.


Posted by: Minivet | Link to this comment | 11-24-17 2:04 PM
horizontal rule
105

We couldn't have been on every lake.


Posted by: Opinionated Humphrey Bogart and Katherine Hepburn | Link to this comment | 11-24-17 2:09 PM
horizontal rule
106

ISTR that Bogie actually sank that one and it was subsequently raised.


Posted by: Mossy Character | Link to this comment | 11-24-17 3:14 PM
horizontal rule
107

Wikipedia says you're right, basically.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 11-24-17 4:38 PM
horizontal rule
108

The first naval engagement of WWI took place on a lake in Africa, but a different lake, Malawi. (Link is quite a long PDF, but amusing.)


Posted by: chris y | Link to this comment | 11-25-17 5:20 AM
horizontal rule
109

Neil MacArthur was the pseudonym Colin Blunstone took when re-recording "She's Not There"


Posted by: Dave Heasman | Link to this comment | 11-25-17 11:36 AM
horizontal rule
110

Vikings arrived in Greenland before the descendants of the Inuit who live there today.


Posted by: rpm | Link to this comment | 11-30-17 3:57 PM
horizontal rule
111

Vikings arrived in Greenland before the descendants of the Inuit who live there today.

Well, yes. I'd estimate that there were Vikings in Greenland about a thousand years before the arrival of any of the descendants of the Inuit who live there today.


Posted by: ajTay | Link to this comment | 11-30-17 4:13 PM
horizontal rule