Re: His Girl Mark

1
So long, Hengelberth, Maolenin, Kerbert Krishnamerk, Githanjaly, Yornaichel, Nixon and Yurbiladyberth.

Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 8:54 PM
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This post should have been entitled "Tick, Tock."


Posted by: SomeCallMeTim | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 8:57 PM
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The piece linked in 1 is awesome. Also, the 'Blossom' spike is totally not where I expected it to be.


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 8:59 PM
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To only who girl names?


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:01 PM
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My name and Ogged's name: never popular.


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:02 PM
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To only who girl names?

"Show," of course. Most of the same letters.


Posted by: ogged | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:03 PM
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I didn't realize that "John" was trending downward while "Jon" trended upwards. I had just always encountered both about equally.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:05 PM
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It's time for Florence to make a comeback.

I knew a Florence from Switzerland who went by Flo in college. A good name. Why should 1890 have all the fun?


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:06 PM
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Speaking of Johns, Bob Herbert says take your empowerment fantasies and get into the goddamn lineup when the fuckbell rings.


Posted by: Gonerill | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:08 PM
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My name and Ogged's name: never popular.

Not since Bitchogged won best supporting actress in 1938, anyway. Golden days.


Posted by: Gonerill | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:10 PM
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I wonder if those are just an error in how things are coded

The FAQ addresses this. Some were common coding errors; some names were routinely abbreviated.


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:10 PM
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The name Maryjane takes a big dip right around the 1960s.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:11 PM
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I spent a while trying to find a name that would show a graph of consistent height throughout the century, with no particular trends, but couldn't find one. Then somehow it turned out that "Benito" pretty much fit the bill, although it dropped out of the top 1000 in 2004, dammit.


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:12 PM
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"Benito" has a noticeable dip in the 40s and 50s as well.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:13 PM
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Totally OT bleg: does anyone here have the ability to contribute some kind of Valuable Prize* for a school raffle? It's a tax writeoff, and PK's school desperately needs money.

*E.g., I am going to hassle my Apple-employed friend in SF to see if he can get us some iPods or iPhones or something.


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:13 PM
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Hillary is worth looking at. As are many Irish names, like Aidan and Liam and some other ones.


Posted by: Gonerill | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:14 PM
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Common Hispanic names are interesting too. You can really see the changing demographics.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:16 PM
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80 of every million babies last year was named "Xzavier"?

It's interesting to see the trends for each letter. A, E, I and O all had their nadirs during the 1960s.

Compare "Queen" to "Princess".


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:17 PM
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It's time for Florence to make a comeback.

I've long thought the same about Adelaide, and wouldn't you know it...

The name Maryjane takes a big dip

dip s/b hit


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:17 PM
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BitchPhd:

I'll donate tickets to the Wine and Garlic Festival.


Posted by: will | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:18 PM
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17: Yes. I was wondering if there were any popular names starting with "U" nowadays. The only ones are "Ulises" and "Uriel".


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:19 PM
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Check out Shaniqua and Shanika.


Posted by: ogged | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:19 PM
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Firenze has a nice ring to it.


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:20 PM
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It's surprising that it takes "Adolph" so long to tail off into obscurity.


Posted by: DS | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:20 PM
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Adonis is on the up and up. But Minerva, though once popular, hasn't been seen since 1980. A post-Potter bump has not appeared, maybe because too many people remember "Minnie." Harry and Herminone similarly have no presence.


Posted by: Gonerill | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:20 PM
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Finnegan, surging now.


Posted by: ogged | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:21 PM
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I've been thinking the same about Adelaide, and wouldn't you know it...

Dammit, both "Owen" and "Evan" are trendy. There go my ideas.

The secret girls' name that I am holding in reserve hasn't reappeared on the list, though.


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:21 PM
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Interestingly, there are no boys names beginning with "Fu" apart from the long-extinct Furman.


Posted by: Gonerill | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:22 PM
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"Ulises." Jesus wept.

The fortunes of "Unknown" are pretty curious.


Posted by: DS | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:23 PM
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Check out "Orange" and "Lemon".


Posted by: Gonerill | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:23 PM
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But oddly no Grapefruit.


Posted by: ogged | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:24 PM
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"Bonnie" was a boys' name?!?

Hmm, my grandfather's name was actually equally popular for boys and girls when he was born. I thought it was only a boys' name in the old country.


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:25 PM
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Awesome! PK's name makes no appearance since the early 1920s.


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:25 PM
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"Ulises" is the Spanish spelling.


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:26 PM
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Y gives a fascinating result, with a huge proliferation of names in recent years. Also, Yoshiko and Yoshio were rising in popularity through the 20s and 30s, and then, not surprising, they vanish.


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:26 PM
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Jesus, you named your kid "Percival?"


Posted by: cerebrocrat | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:26 PM
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Compare "Francis" and "Francisco" for a nice example of the changing demographics.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:26 PM
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Finnegan

Christ. Finnegan is of course a surname. But I imagine sleep-deprived yuppie couples mumbling "Urgh ... Finneganswake" at 3:30am.


Posted by: Gonerill | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:27 PM
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"Meta"!


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:28 PM
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Compare Mercy, Charity, and Love.


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:28 PM
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28: There's no "Fuoad?" I'm too lazy to look myself.


Posted by: cerebrocrat | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:29 PM
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40: Also, Hope.


Posted by: Gonerill | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:29 PM
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36: Ooh! Good suggestion for the next one, thanks!

Fabian: surprisingly popular.


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:30 PM
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Check out "Orange" and "Lemon".

I've mentioned before that my great-grandfather was named Orange. And yes, he was born in the 1880s.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:30 PM
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Orange you glad he wasn't named Banana?


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:31 PM
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40, 42: Also, Faith. Not sure what to think about that.


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:31 PM
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Mohammad, in its various spellings, continue to rise.


Posted by: ogged | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:31 PM
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Ditto Ahmed and Ali (as a boy's name).


Posted by: ogged | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:32 PM
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40: Thanks, knew I was forgetting something. So we're big on hope and charity, but down, down, down on love and mercy.

Materialistic bastards, aren't we?


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:32 PM
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Also, Faith. Not sure what to think about that.

Probably has to do with Faith Hill. Compare "Shania."


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:33 PM
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Missy seems to have died a deserved death.


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:34 PM
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Things are not looking good for me and my fellow Thomases. A breeding program may need to be established. I'll have to start looking into grants.


Posted by: Tom | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:35 PM
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OTOH, I bet Buffy's going to make a resurgence.


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:35 PM
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49: Also we no longer aspire for our daughters to be Queens or Queenies, but merely Princesses. Where's the respect for women's agency, people?

Awesome! PK's name makes no appearance since the early 1920s.

I cannot believe you named him Ernst.


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:35 PM
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I didn't realize that Lisa wasn't among the consistently popular names.


Posted by: ogged | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:36 PM
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Huh, ditto Linda.


Posted by: ogged | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:36 PM
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51: huh, I know somebody named that. She doesn't look like an outlier.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:37 PM
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Y'all making fun of Princess: check the popularity of Prince.


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:37 PM
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Xander doesn't show up until 2003. Joss Whedon is an influential man.


Posted by: Matt F | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:37 PM
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I'll have to start looking into grants.

You're in luck, Tom. "Grant" is making a comeback.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:38 PM
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Compare "Shania."

Did you know that her real name is Shania Langhorn Clemens?


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:38 PM
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Apparently we've devalued not only mercy and love, but also frank and earnest.


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:39 PM
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Check out "Chasity" instead of "Chastity".

Also, this informs me that the pretentious naming of boys with what should be last names is no new phenomenon. E.g. "Granville", "Furman" and "Thurston". But it does seem to be new for girls.


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:39 PM
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"Lily" has gone boom recently, too.


Posted by: Gonerill | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:40 PM
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Not a single goddam Qwerty.


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:40 PM
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"Lily" has gone boom recently, too.

Ditto Piper.


Posted by: ogged | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:41 PM
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Yup, my great-granddaddy invested heavily way back when -- Hazel, Hortense, Gertrude, Viola, Lovie, Prudence. He thought he had quite the diversified portfolio, all strong performers. Course, by the end of the war, he'd pretty much lost everything...


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:41 PM
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Not a single goddam Qwerty.

Ben is in fairly constant decline, though. (As is "Ben.")


Posted by: Gonerill | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:41 PM
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Lolita apparently died right when the novel was published, but came back again until 1980. Did a movie come out then?


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:42 PM
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Ben is in fairly constant decline, though. (As is "Ben.")

Shortened forms used alone seem to have been a lot more common 100 years ago than now. Not sure if this is a reporting artifact or if it indicates a real practice.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:45 PM
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I mean, "Ben" is on a steady decline, but look at "Benjamin." (No comment on Ben.)


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:45 PM
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(As is "Ben.")

Not true of "Benjamin". Benjiman, Benjaman, and Benjamine (and Benton and Benito) have all seen better days, though.


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:46 PM
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Ahmad, Yusuf, Mohammed, Hamza, all on the upswing. I hope M/chelle Malk/n doesn't get wind of this.


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:46 PM
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73: "Tariq" seems to be declining, though.

That many people were actually named "Bud"?


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:49 PM
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Pink, Golden, Green, Orange, Brown, all used to be men's names in the 1890s. WTF?


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:53 PM
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Curious about chicken-and-egg with popular television. Is the Emma upswing a product of "Friends," or were they just riding a pre-existing Emma trend? Same with Aidan, of SatC.


Posted by: susan | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:53 PM
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34: Damn, I'm a total racist. Shit.


Posted by: DS | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:54 PM
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Emma, I bet, is just part of the larger resurgence in old-fashioned sounding names. See also Ella, Sophie, Chloe, etc.


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:55 PM
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Common Hispanic names are interesting too. You can really see the changing demographics.

Judging by "Ofelia", we had a big Hispanic influx in the 1920s through the 1950s, followed by assimilation.


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:56 PM
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Opal, Pearl: names of the past. Ruby: experiencing a revival. Emerald, Amber: recently hot, then not. Diamond? Surging.


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:57 PM
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79: You have to look at the absolute numbers too, not just the relative ones.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:58 PM
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Look at "Woodrow" and "Franklin."


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 9:59 PM
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80: Along the same lines, Rose: dead. Iris, Daisy: coming back.


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:00 PM
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Also "Calvin."


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:00 PM
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And "Dwight."


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:01 PM
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"Theodore" too, which is interesting because it's not as uncommon a name to begin with.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:02 PM
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Along the same lines, Rose: dead.

My grandmother is named Rose and she isn't dead (yet).


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:03 PM
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See Jameson.


Posted by: A White Bear | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:04 PM
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And of course "Roosevelt".


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:04 PM
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Wow, "Simon" might be the best example of the gringo fade, hispanic surge. Assuming many of those later "Simons" are actually named "Simón".


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:04 PM
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I know a 26-year-old named Rose. She plays bass.

And here's a 22 year old.


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:05 PM
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And Alize, like the girl-drink.


Posted by: A White Bear | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:05 PM
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I would like to have a large number of children named Janus, April, May, June, Julia/us, Augusta/us, Septima/us, etc.

Very convenient that omitting February and March makes September the seventh month again.


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:06 PM
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Meanwhile you have the gringo fade, Asian-American surge with "Grace".


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:07 PM
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Of all the names in P.G. Wodehouse, I would not have picked "Augustus" to be making a comeback right now.


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:07 PM
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Check out "Chasity" instead of "Chastity"

The shift manager at the Hardee's where I get breakfast is named Chasity.

The arc of all three of my kids' names&emdash;Keegan, Noah, and Cassidy&emdash;are recent spikes, though both Keegan and Cassidy remain fairly uncommon. Noah, on the other hand, has just exploded over the past decade. Also, Cassidy abruptly changed from a boy's name in the '90s to a girl's name in the '00s.

Russ, on the other hand? Totally out of fashion.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:08 PM
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I had no idea Asa was on the upswing.


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:08 PM
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names—Keegan, Noah, and Cassidy—are

It's spelled "&mdash", apo.


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:09 PM
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Egbert, on the other hand, is one of those 19th century names that's disappeared.


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:10 PM
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"Asa"? What's next, "Oscar"?

(checks)
Oh yeah, that Latino thing again. "Oscar" is indeed reappearing.


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:10 PM
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Lots of boys named Helen in 1900.


Posted by: A White Bear | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:10 PM
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Yeah, sorry. Also, I just edited your comment instead of mine by mistake.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:10 PM
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Tom, my parents and Grandparents did their parts on increasing the number of Toms.


Posted by: TJ | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:10 PM
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90: I doubt it. I think Simon's become popular with white parents of my generation again.


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:11 PM
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104: What about Oscar?


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:11 PM
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Taylor, Cooper, Sawyer -- so nice to see young people going back into the trades. Smith, Wright, and Miller, however, haven't been popular for a long time.


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:11 PM
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"Unique" has an odd profile.


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:11 PM
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Lots of male Susans in the 40s to 70s.


Posted by: A White Bear | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:12 PM
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107: The dip between peaks is like, D'oh!


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:13 PM
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I for one am shocked that this thing doesn't allow diacritical marks. How am I to see the trends in naming boys "Törless"?


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:13 PM
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Ayesha shows up nowhere?


Posted by: A White Bear | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:15 PM
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Evelyn, for men, had its biggest peak around 1900. Waugh was among the last of his kind.


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:15 PM
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Hamp? People were named Hamp?


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:15 PM
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Quite surprised by the popularity of "Hattie", "Hettie" and "Fannie". I thought those were just nicknames.


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:15 PM
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Uh, except for the fact that he's from a different country than this covers.


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:15 PM
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"Jade" is coming on strong, mysteriously. And my name just took off after I was born, going from relative obscurity to a respectable level of popularity.


Posted by: foolishmortal | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:16 PM
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Far fewer Dicks than there used to be.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:16 PM
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Nëddy: I can enter diacriticals into it just fine. There are no results for Törless, or for Çally.


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:16 PM
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90: I doubt it. I think Simon's become popular with white parents of my generation again.

I thought of that after commenting, realizing I know at least two gringo Simons. "Oscar" maybe, as Ned points out.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:16 PM
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Ayesha shows up nowhere?

Try Iesha or Aisha


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:16 PM
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Ayesha shows up nowhere?

Try Aisha.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:17 PM
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Hamp?

Vlasta?


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:17 PM
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Also no Juliaännes.


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:17 PM
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Alternatively, you could try Iesha.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:18 PM
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But Ayesha is, like, literary! And quite common, I thought! Also, male Hillary/Hilary? I know, like, three.


Posted by: A White Bear | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:18 PM
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Silvio must have been a second generation immigrant.


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:18 PM
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Friends of mine named their son Dashiell, which I'm mildly surprised not to find at all.


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:19 PM
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But Ayesha is, like, literary!

From what?

You'll be shocked that "Heathcliff" does not appear either.

And quite common, I thought!

Where? I've never seen it.


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:19 PM
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Sunny and Sunshine appear for the first time in the '70s, peak in the '80s, then disappear in the '90s. I blame hippies.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:20 PM
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128: The late 19th-c sensation novel "She" -- "She who must be obeyed" is the nickname of the immortal white African queen Ayesha.


Posted by: A White Bear | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:20 PM
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Tragically, Emile and Emilee are unlikely to marry.


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:21 PM
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"Jade" is coming on strong, mysteriously.

Because of Asian fetish porn, probably.


Posted by: ogged | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:21 PM
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Oscar: also popular with semi-hip, semi-urban 30-something white parents.


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:21 PM
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Hamp is a pretty cool name.


Posted by: ogged | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:22 PM
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Shockingly, "Trinity" has maintained its popularity after we thought the Matrix sequels would destroy it forever.


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:23 PM
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...who are searching desparately for a name no one else would possibly use.

How long before Seymour comes back?


Posted by: marcus | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:23 PM
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Also interesting: the deaths of Johnson, Smith, and Jones as first names.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:23 PM
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136 to 133.


Posted by: marcus | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:23 PM
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I'm willing to bet that Joaquin's huge jump owes something to hip white parents, too.


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:24 PM
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Ples, also cool.


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:24 PM
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47, 48: See also Omar.


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:25 PM
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136: It's fixing for a comeback, right after "Mortimer" and "Octave".


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:25 PM
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Enhamp the Hamperor!


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:25 PM
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The recent surge of "Miles": a red-state fuck-off to the metric system?


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:26 PM
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141 to 90.


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:26 PM
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The late 19th-c sensation novel "She" -- "She who must be obeyed" is the nickname of the immortal white African queen Ayesha.

This book had a huge impact on me at a formative pre-pubescent age. H. Rider Haggard rocks.

Funny that a late Victorian author would have picked a name that seems to fit current urban black naming conventions so perfectly.


Posted by: marcus | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:27 PM
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The recent surge of "Miles": a red-state fuck-off to the metric system?

An expression of old-school-hipster appreciation for the bearer of the cool.


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:27 PM
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136: It's fixing for a comeback, right after "Mortimer" and "Octave".

"Octave", "Fifth", and "Tritone"


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:28 PM
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Who'd have thought that Icie was more popular than Icy? Not me, that's for sure.


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:28 PM
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Consistently lots of female Charleses before 1980.


Posted by: A White Bear | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:28 PM
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That is, Charles girls.


Posted by: A White Bear | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:28 PM
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136: Not at all. The idea is "old-fashioned, somewhat unusual, but not completely unique." No one wants their kids name to be the next Zephyr.

(Willow: rising fast post-2003. More Whedon effect. Gaylord: abandoned post-1970, ripe for use by parents who want their kid to have a name no one else shares.)


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:29 PM
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Louise and Louis are growing old together.


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:29 PM
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Iola, Ione, and Iona were all of roughly equal popularity back in the day, but Io never shows up at all. There is a bit of Leda back before 1910, though. Nor Hera nor Heracles nor Hercules.


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:30 PM
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Madonna appears to have killed off that name, though I did know one in college.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:30 PM
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I can't use the site on my crappy old computer. But I've always had a fondness for Roman emperor names, very few of which are used at all today. Someone shoudl revive Hostilian, it sounds badass.


Posted by: marcus | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:34 PM
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Stella!

(Coming back!)


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:34 PM
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My operating system is too old for me to install the Java plugin. I'm sad that I can't play.


Posted by: Bostoniangirl | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:36 PM
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I'm guessing no one actually named their kid 'Unknown.' Someone should.


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:36 PM
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I'm surprised "Louise" hasn't become trendy. Louise Brooks, hello?!?

An expression of old-school-hipster appreciation for the bearer of the cool.

Sure, and I suppose we're about to see an upsurge of "Hamp" in honor of Lionel Hampton.


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:36 PM
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Male Maud.


Posted by: A White Bear | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:36 PM
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Infant, on the other hand, must be a real name.


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:37 PM
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156: Neither Tarquin nor Superb. Shameful.


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:37 PM
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My great-uncle was one of the surge in Edisons 85 or so years ago.

It seems to be reappearing?!?


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:38 PM
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Another occupation coming back, a bit: Fletcher.


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:38 PM
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Tristan is back; the search for Isolde turned up Isom.


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:39 PM
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Marcus, you will be happy to learn that "Maximus" has made the top 1000 in the last couple years.


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:39 PM
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"back" should be "on the rise"


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:40 PM
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Miguel, I bet, is totally due to a growing Latino population, though.

More demonstration of hipster old-fashioned nameism: Hazel.


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:40 PM
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My father's name has declined all the way to less than tenth place. His middle name doesn't show up at all, though.


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:40 PM
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If I were cuckolded and had to raise another man's child, I would name him [null character] and doom him to a life of fuck ups.

Also, I predict a resurgence of "Omar" among hip white people.


Posted by: foolishmortal | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:40 PM
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Emerson is resurgent. But you knew that.


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:42 PM
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Funny that a late Victorian author would have picked a name that seems to fit current urban black naming conventions so perfectly.

Not really.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:42 PM
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Names beginning in "Bu": no longer popular. At all.


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:42 PM
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More demonstration of hipster old-fashioned nameism: Hazel.

Only for girls, though.

Cyrus is doing ok.


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:43 PM
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A huge decline in "Chin"s in the late 19th century: must be the result of exclusion.


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:43 PM
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Baby? People actually named their children Baby? Wow.


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:43 PM
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Another occupation coming back

Mason, Hunter, Tucker.

Frankly I don't know if a "tucker" was really an occupation or not. Maybe all these kids are being named after Tucker Max.

Also, I predict a resurgence of "Omar" among hip white people.

These hipsters need to give themselves a challenge, and stop using names that are popular with the gente or that one would find in novels by Henry James.

See if you can popularize "Enos" and "Laverne" for babies, then I'll be impressed.


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:44 PM
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Wong has a similar profile to Chin.


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:44 PM
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176: Wong too.


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:45 PM
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Or could that just be kids whose parents didn't name them before leaving the hospital? I want to know where these names are gotten.


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:45 PM
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Hey!


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:45 PM
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Baby? People actually named their children Baby? Wow.

Actually I was going to mention that. In my family tree there's a couple names like "Baby Watk/ns", who were children who died before their christening ceremonies or something. I thought there might be some of those in the census from 1890 or so, but no, all the "Baby"s are recent!


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:45 PM
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177: sure, like Dirty Dancing! I am going to name all my children after characters in Dirty Dancing actually.


Posted by: Brodysattva | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:45 PM
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I understand Kriston's on the rise.


Posted by: Armsmasher | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:45 PM
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The resurgence of Emerson has not helped Ralph or Waldo.


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:46 PM
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177: Nobody puts Baby in a corner.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:46 PM
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I understand Kriston's on the rise.

Close your door, dude.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:46 PM
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Crap, IMDB informs me that the girl in Dirty Dancing didn't have "Baby" on her birth certificate. And I had this whole plan and everything.


Posted by: Brodysattva | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:47 PM
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Mason, Hunter, Tucker.

I know someone who has children named Mason and Hunter, actually.

It's interesting to try sound combinations and see how they wane over time: Bu? Hopelessly old-fashioned. Br? Totally modern.


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:48 PM
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No worries, "Brodysattva" is a great surname no matter what you christen your children.


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:48 PM
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People had the good sense to stop using Woodie over a century ago. Woody came and went later.


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:49 PM
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Heh, if only.


Posted by: Brodysattva | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:49 PM
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People had the good sense to stop using Woodie over a century ago. Woody came and went later.

And "Boner" isn't anywhere on the list. That Growing Pains character was not popular enough, I guess.


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:50 PM
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Olive is due for a return pretty soon, I would think. And now would be the perfect time for "Drupe" to come on the scene.

O, luscious drupe!


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:50 PM
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In junior high we had an assignment that involved inventing a pretend prime time tv schedule. The teacher's were not amused that we called one of our sitcoms "Groin Pains."


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:51 PM
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And now would be the perfect time for "Drupe" to come on the scene.

Or at least "Drusilla".


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:51 PM
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teachers


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:51 PM
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The teacher's were not amused

Well, this sentence is just a self-fulfilling prophecy, isn't it.


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:52 PM
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crap. 200.


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:52 PM
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Seriously, nothing for Marigold?


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:53 PM
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Jean and Jean share one peak, after which Jean went into decline.


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:53 PM
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Inexplicably unpopular: Screech.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:54 PM
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Lulu and Lula will surely follow Luna.


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:54 PM
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Olive is due for a return pretty soon, I would think
See: Olivia.


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:56 PM
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"Storm" and "Stone" are both bad names.


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:56 PM
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I have relatives named McKenzie, Mackenzie, Colby, Cody, Carly, Mason, and Kirby, and that's only a selection. Sa/selgy's gf and I often play the who's-bigger-white-trash game, and those qualitatively she has me beat, quantitatively, my record is unimpeachable.


Posted by: Armsmasher | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:56 PM
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Check out the creepy surge for Nevaeh.


Posted by: ogged | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:57 PM
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Lulu and Lula will surely follow Luna.

See: Lola, Lucy.


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:58 PM
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Man, fuck Olivia. Olive. Olive is where it's at.

I'm very glad to see both Celia and Cecilia doing well, and find the fact that Cecil was a girl's name in the '20s quite pleasing.


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 10:58 PM
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208: Oh yuck.


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:00 PM
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Cecil is a great name for a girl.


Posted by: ogged | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:00 PM
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Cecil is a great name for a girl.

This is so, so true.


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:01 PM
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I would go straight for a girl named Cecil.


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:02 PM
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Lulu and Lula will surely follow Luna.

And then, Luau.


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:04 PM
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Hamp? People were named Hamp?

At least in the south, "Hamp" is a not uncommon shortening of "Hampton"--as in "Wade Hampton." I've probably known a dozen or so Hamps or Hamptons.

I'm amused that my given name and the girl's name my parents chose before I was born both peaked about the year I was born. The 'rents were nothing if not trendy.


Posted by: Populuxe | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:04 PM
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I'm surprised that Edwin has never quite fallen out of use.


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:05 PM
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No matter whether it were pronounced Sessil or Seesil?


Posted by: ogged | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:05 PM
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I'm not surprised by Hamp as a shortened name or nickname, just by Hamp as what appears to have been the full name.


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:06 PM
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Full first name, that is.


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:06 PM
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The ex and I had more or less settled on Eddy as the name of a potential daughter. I don't see that surging.


Posted by: ogged | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:06 PM
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I would go straight for a girl named Cecil.

Parents, you've been warned.


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:06 PM
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No matter whether it were pronounced Sessil or Seesil?

As if there's really an option.


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:06 PM
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90: I doubt it. I think Simon's become popular with white parents of my generation again.

Could be the hispanic thing again, but I think all the Edwin's I've ever met have been Puerto Rican. They've been (I assume) counted in the mix since 1898.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:08 PM
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221: Try "Eddie." You're trendier than you think.


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:08 PM
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Capitola was a first name for girls, at one point. I know it only as a place name.


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:08 PM
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219, 220: See 70.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:09 PM
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221: Try "Eddie." You're trendier than you think.

Nothing since the 60s.


Posted by: ogged | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:09 PM
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Marisol: Hispanic influx, or white urban hipsters? Hard to say.


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:09 PM
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Oops. 90: I doubt it. I think Simon's become popular with white parents of my generation again.I'm surprised that Edwin has never quite fallen out of use.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:09 PM
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And not even very many then.


Posted by: ogged | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:10 PM
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I think you're overestimating the contribution of white urban hipsters to the popularity of Hispanic names, b.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:10 PM
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228: Right, but still: novel-sounding, but actually rather old-fashioned. Welcome to urban white hipsterdom, my friend.


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:10 PM
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I would go straight for a girl named Cecil

You could be Benny and Cecil.


Posted by: Populuxe | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:10 PM
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Neither Coelacanth nor Obedienta seem to be popular.


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:11 PM
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224: I didn't know Edwin was a Puerto Rican name. It was a common name for white men in the late 19th century.


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:11 PM
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232: How many hip white urban parents do you know, Teo? And with how many have you discussed possible baby names?


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:11 PM
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This is just how naming trends go; you just happen to know white urban hipsters.


Posted by: ogged | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:12 PM
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Chiquita has a nice run.


Posted by: Wrongshore | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:12 PM
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To add to 236: Edwin was probably common before the late 19th century, too. The Edwins I've come across were all born earlier in the century.


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:13 PM
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How many hip white urban parents do you know, Teo?

Very few.

And with how many have you discussed possible baby names?

Maybe a couple.

I'm not denying that they're using these names, I just don't think there are enough of them to be the driving force behind the increasing popularity of them. Look at "Juan" and "Luis." Do white urban hipsters use those names?


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:13 PM
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There was a brief period during which Foy, Loy, and Joy, as mens' names, had all cracked 1000.


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:14 PM
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Another unexpected girls' name: Clifford.

I would not go straight for a girl named Clifford.


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:15 PM
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Juan and Luis, no. But the others, I've heard more than one young white couple propose as a "cool" name.

Anyhoo. To bed with my head cold. You may all pray for me.


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:15 PM
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It's too bad the name database doesn't go back further: There's probably a lot of classical names we're missing. And with middle names you'd probably get a better feel for the era: lots of Georges could have been George Washingtons, for example.


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:16 PM
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244: I'm going to pray you don't name a kid Percival.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:21 PM
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244: I'm going to pray you don't name a kid Percival.

How do you feel about Percy?


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:24 PM
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How do you feel about Percy?

I'm almost 40 years old and I would still want to pick on him. Unless his last name was Sledge.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:28 PM
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Or you could go with Roland: both a knight and a synthesizer. It doesn't get any better than that.


Posted by: foolishmortal | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:29 PM
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What about if his middle name was Byce?


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:30 PM
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I dub thee Sir Moog.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:30 PM
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250: Wedgie city.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:31 PM
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KORG


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:31 PM
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251: Robert Moog actually was knighted, actually.


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:32 PM
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254: I did not know that. Wouldn't have happened had he been named Percival Moog.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:33 PM
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Actually Actually is going to be the name of a character in my next musical.


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:34 PM
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Will he be an actuary?


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:34 PM
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Robert Moog

I'm friends with one of his granddaughters.


Posted by: Armsmasher | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:34 PM
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Oh, man, check out Brooklyn and Romeo. Disgusting. I can only imagine the havoc this has wreaked in England.


Posted by: foolishmortal | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:37 PM
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Moody shows up in the 1890s.


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:37 PM
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Rexford is waiting to be revived.


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:37 PM
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Bernice Bobs His Hair could have been written about the same time as the famous story.


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:39 PM
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Cecily is similar to Cecil & would probably like her parents better.

I can't play with this site, so I'll go to the Soc. Sec. one and note that there's less state to state variation than you might think, especially among girl's names (where the thing that jumps out at me is the popularity of Katherine & Elizabeth in D.C.) In boys' names, Logan, Landon, & Hunter seem more rural, & the obviously hispanic names have more of an influence.

Actually, the same is true internationally: Sophie/Sophia/Sofia makes the list in Australia, New Zealand, Argentina, Chile, Denmark, England, Germany, Ireland, & Scotland. Emma makes it in New Zealand, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Ireland, Malta, the Netherlands, Norway, Scotland, & Sweden. etc.

You do also have your Manons, Mologrots, Gradpulks, & Małgorzatas though.

Perhaps Gradpulk sounds lovely when pronounced with the right accent.


Posted by: Katherine | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:41 PM
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That's ridiculous. Gradpulk sounds lovely regardless of accent.


Posted by: an on | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:42 PM
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Dayton is also popular. Quick, claim Akron before it gets too cool!


Posted by: Katherine | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:46 PM
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You may be too late for that.


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:50 PM
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Treasure is so 2004. Is there some pop cultural explanation?


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:51 PM
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I can't play with this site, so I'll go to the Soc. Sec. one and note that there's less state to state variation than you might think, especially among girl's names

Really? I thought there were some pretty noticeable regional trends; Madison and (especially) William are more common in the South, while Olivia and Matthew are more northern. There are exceptions, of course, and I haven't actually counted.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-10-07 11:55 PM
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If BR is new, and BU is old, then BO is right down the middle.


Posted by: A White Bear | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 12:04 AM
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Best new old name for me: Otho and Otha, both boys' names.

Yes, Otho is the guy from Beetlejuice. I thought it was made up.


Posted by: A White Bear | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 12:06 AM
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See, I just always assumed Madison was southern, or certainly not Northeastern. (I assume it's not big in Wisconsin, either.) But I can't get over all those Emmas and Ethans and Jacobs everywhere.


Posted by: Katherine | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 12:10 AM
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Yes, Otho is the guy from Beetlejuice. I thought it was made up.

Nope.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 12:14 AM
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I didn't know Edwin was a Puerto Rican name.

Plenty of Edwins in Puerto Rico. Not sure why. I've also encountered my fair share of Latinos named "Jhonny" or "Jhonathan." This guy's wiki claims clerical error, but I've met quite a few. Mostly from Venezuela and Colombia, actually.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 12:15 AM
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271: The thing about Madison is that it's risen to its current popularity very recently, so I at least didn't have any preconceptions about it at all. It does seem to be largely a southern thing, though, and more popular there than the Emmas and Jacobs. And look at William.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 12:16 AM
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273:

The unusual spelling of his first name is attributed to a clerical error on his birth certificate. He has refused to have it changed. The letter combinations "Jh" or "Gh" are sometimes used in the Spanish language to represent the English "J" sound, as the "J" in Spanish is normally pronounced as an English "H".

Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 12:17 AM
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I've never encountered that orthographical convention myself, but then I haven't had much contact with people from South America or the Caribbean.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 12:18 AM
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That wiki explanation's confusing though. Clerical error, or orthographic rendering of an English sound?


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 12:18 AM
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Oh, and, also, they tend to pronounce it like "YOE-nee" or "YOE-na-tan".


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 12:19 AM
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I once knew a woman whose maiden name was Gwendolyn Hofnagle. She married Jimmy Tymcsm,
and they hyphenated, so she became
Gwendolyn Hofnagle-Tymcsm.


Posted by: joel hanes | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 12:20 AM
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273: That must explain the Edwin continuity. Thanks.


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 12:23 AM
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Clerical error, or orthographic rendering of an English sound?

Probably clerical error caused by the orthographic convention. That is, his parents wanted his name to be spelled "Johnny" but whoever was writing it down on the certificate spelled it "Jhonny" instead because that is a conventional way to indicate the English sound.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 12:24 AM
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Or maybe two different Wiki editors added different explanations without attempting to reconcile them.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 12:26 AM
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283

280: Are you being glib? I'm too tired to tell.

281: I'm thinking some combination as well. But I don't know of another "Jh" word.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 12:28 AM
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284

136 How long before Seymour comes back?

Sometimes Buddy on the phone extension from the other bedroom is close enough.


Posted by: joel hanes | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 12:28 AM
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Are you being glib?

No. I'm actually thanking you. But now it seems so earnest I wonder if I should be glib.


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 12:29 AM
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285: "Glib" has yet to make a run it seems. Just sayin'.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 12:30 AM
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Or maybe "Gleb" to incorporate your current pseud.

(Sorry for the miscue.)


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 12:31 AM
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From my link in 1:

"I need to know how they would define those 100 names," said Jhonny Owee Milano Rodríguez, a congressman representing Cojedes State. "For example, why not 120? This seems arbitrary to me."

Mr. Milano, 55, said his first name, Jhonny, spelled as such, was inspired by the international ambience of the oil town in eastern Venezuela where he was born. Owee, he said, was erroneously entered in the birth registry instead of Oved.


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 12:31 AM
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I actually pulled my pseud out of the 19th century. Or maybe I did.


Posted by: eb | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 12:32 AM
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I should go to bed. Good night, trees. Good night, moon. Good night, blog.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 12:36 AM
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My cousin claimed for years that he would name his firstborn son after the unified school district just south of where I grew up. The child would have been
Rockwell Swaledale Stone
which I think has a certain ring.
Unfortunately, my cousin remains without issue.


Posted by: joel hanes | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 12:37 AM
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Damn.
In 284, Buddy s/b Zooey.
Which makes it too obvious.


Posted by: joel hanes | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 12:39 AM
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"the nickname of the immortal white African queen Ayesha"

"current urban black naming conventions"

Aisha (Turkish spelling: Ayşe) is a very popular name for Muslim girls, after the favorite wife of Mohammed, the "Mother of the Believers"


Posted by: Knecht Ruprecht | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 3:11 AM
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Letter-to-editor writer in this morning's NYT is named "Smoot".


Posted by: joel hanes | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 8:09 AM
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As a first name? Because it's an honored last name on the MIT campus.


Posted by: LizardBreath | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 8:14 AM
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Rooti-ti-toot for Smoot of Ut!


Posted by: redfoxtailshrub | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 8:15 AM
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That is, his parents wanted his name to be spelled "Johnny" but whoever was writing it down on the certificate spelled it "Jhonny" instead because that is a conventional way to indicate the English sound.

There's a lot of Latin Americans named "Jhonny". And "Jh" to indicate the J sound for other names. Why? So they don't get pronounced "Honny", "Honathan", etc.

Check out the minor-league results for a search for "Jh" on baseball-reference.com. There's also the cartoonist Jhonen Vazquez.


Posted by: | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 8:21 AM
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I still haven't gotten an explanation for my question in 75.


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 8:23 AM
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Smoot Carl-Mitchell
(and his reverend occiput)
Smite, Smoot! Smite for UT!


Posted by: joel hanes | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 8:25 AM
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The name "Madison" refers back to Marbury vs. Madison, the case which established judicial review. It's a subtle way of affirming the unitary presidency.


Posted by: John Emerson | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 8:46 AM
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297: There's a pizza place in my (Dominican) neighborhood with a sign reading Jhon's in one place, although John's in another. I'd assumed the first was a sign-painter's error, and the second was right, but maybe not.


Posted by: LizardBreath | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 8:48 AM
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My two preceding generations include Albert, Edwin, Elroy, Oscar, Mabel, Emma and Leola. Further back there's a Calista , a Spink, and an Alpheus Dumbleton (Hiams).


Posted by: John Emerson | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 8:56 AM
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In Splash, Daryl Hannah's mermaid names herself 'Madison' after the avenue. Pretty much no one used it as a first name before, and it's now the third most popular name for girls. It's the persuasive power of Ron Howard, not just the rejection of judicial review.


Posted by: Zonule of Zinn | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 9:01 AM
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I find fantasizing about mermaid ultimately frustrating. what are you supposed to do, spawn?


Posted by: John Emerson | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 9:02 AM
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304 - this issue was addressed in the Futurama episode "The Deep South".

Leola is a great name. It should become popular again. And for boys, Lititz.


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 9:05 AM
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There's a lot of Latin Americans named "Jhonny". And "Jh" to indicate the J sound for other names. Why? So they don't get pronounced "Honny", "Honathan", etc.

I'm coming around to thinking this might be at least partially right, but (a) I've only ever encountered the "Jh" spelling in people's names—no other Spanish words, (b) I've encountered Latinos with it spelled the "correct" way, too, and (c) examples like LB's neighborhood suggest it's not a hard-and-fast rule.

I had assumed it was an error that got propagated out, but I have no proof of that, am arguing completely ex recta, and should get back to work.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 9:08 AM
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In Splash, Daryl Hannah's mermaid names herself 'Madison' after the avenue. Pretty much no one used it as a first name before, and it's now the third most popular name for girls. It's the persuasive power of Ron Howard, not just the rejection of judicial review.

This is only partially true. The real surge in the popularity of the name Madison came after 1992 when people saw how cute my daughter (Madison) was.


Posted by: will | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 9:09 AM
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Lititz: A Mennonite town which makes most of the world's mousetraps.

Perhaps Anglicizing Latinos spell names Jhulio, Jhorge, etc. to indicate their intention of assimilating. But alas, the intention is only evident to Spanish-speakers, not to English-speakers. Catch-22.


Posted by: John Emerson | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 9:13 AM
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It's so ugly -- doesn't look like English or like Spanish -- that I don't believe it's a 'real' orthographic rule, in the sense of having any history behind it. But I'd believe it as a kludge someone came up with to tip people off that his name was pronounced with an English rather than a Spanish J, even though the context was generally Spanish (which would explain the 'names only' thing. If it's a word, it's either English pronounced as such, or Spanish pronounced as such. You'd only get a "We're speaking Spanish generally, but drop into English for this sound" situation in a name). And then it could have taken off from there.

But I'm making shit up, I've only ever encountered it personally on one sign.


Posted by: LizardBreath | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 9:13 AM
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There are lots of "Jhon" and "Jhonny"s here in Chile who have never set foot in the U.S., for what that's worth. ("Jonathan" is more common and doesn't get mispronounced.)


Posted by: neil | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 9:15 AM
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(The only other place I've seen the "jh" combination is at Jhot Pizza near my house. I am not sure whether it's supposed to be pronounced "hot" or "jot".)


Posted by: neil | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 9:17 AM
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Where the hell does the name Nevaeh come from?

If I ever have a daughter, I think I'd like to name her "Joy." After Joy in the Morning, of course.


Posted by: Jackmormon | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 9:24 AM
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re: 309

Making shit up is a time honoured tradition. It certainly predates the use of 'Jh'. Make shit up with pride.


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 9:24 AM
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Nevaeh.


Posted by: ogged | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 9:26 AM
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Whoah. Dude.


Posted by: Jackmormon | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 9:33 AM
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I've only ever encountered the "Jh" spelling in people's names--no other Spanish words

I don't see why you're so surprised by this. Since the sound in question doesn't exist in Spanish, there's no reason for it to be spelled in any manner in regular Spanish words.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 9:34 AM
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Make shit up with pride.

Or machines.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 9:37 AM
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oral died off a long time ago.

sending the wrong signals perhaps?


Posted by: MaxPolun | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 9:42 AM
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I don't see why you're so surprised by this. Since the sound in question doesn't exist in Spanish, there's no reason for it to be spelled in any manner in regular Spanish words.

I'm not surprised. I don't know exactly what's going on with "Jh", really. Doesn't seem anyone here does, though the two theories I'm seeing, (1) spelling/clerical error that spread or (2) intentional choice to avoid a "Honathan" pronunciation both seem plausible (and maybe interrelated&mdashi.e., a clerical decision to render it "Jh" to avoid confusion).

As for the sound not existing in Spanish, it seems to me that "Jh" is pronounced the same as the "Y" in Yolanda or yo, with some folks tinging it with a bit of a "J" sound. Could be my imperfect ear, though.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 10:16 AM
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Yeah, "y" is pronounced with a sound similar to English "j" in some dialects of Spanish (though apparently not the ones in question here).

Since "jh" seems to be pretty common in both South America and the Caribbean, but is (afaik) unknown in Mexico, I suspect it's mainly encountered in the (few) parts of the US where the Hispanic population is not primarily of Mexican origin. I've never seen it here, for instance.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 10:29 AM
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175: Cyrus is doing ok.

Posted by: ben w-lfs-n

I already knew it was much more popular a century ago than it is today. However, it's interesting to see that long steady decline until just a decade or two before I was born, and then it starts climbing again. It looks downright (relatively) common for babies today. Also interesting: my sister's name is Zoe, and its popularity mushroomed out of nowhere in 1990, just four years after she was born.


Posted by: Cyrus | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 10:30 AM
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As for the sound not existing in Spanish, it seems to me that "Jh" is pronounced the same as the "Y" in Yolanda or yo, with some folks tinging it with a bit of a "J" sound. Could be my imperfect ear, though.

That's also how I've heard it pronounced, almost like the leading j in German words and names. At least, that's the pronounciation of the aforementioned Jhonen Vasquez.


Posted by: Po-Mo Polymath | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 10:41 AM
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I thought "Claudio' would be one of the Hispanic names on this site. Apparently not.


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 09-11-07 10:42 AM
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