Re: You gotta feel it in your butt.

1

Make my mix the apo mix!

You are bringing this to Unfogged II: Fog or Be Fogged aren't you?


Posted by: M/tch M/lls | Link to this comment | 11-17-07 7:24 PM
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2

I think he's uploaded it so that it need not be physically transported.


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 11-17-07 7:27 PM
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3

I'll be bringing it preloaded in my booty, baby.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 11-17-07 7:29 PM
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4

is that you, circa age 17?


Posted by: mike d | Link to this comment | 11-17-07 7:40 PM
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5

No, just a random picture from the internets.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 11-17-07 7:45 PM
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6

Looks like Ez/ra Kl/ein in a wig, actually.


Posted by: Hamilton-Lovecraft | Link to this comment | 11-17-07 8:22 PM
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7

Feel it in the butt?


Posted by: TJ | Link to this comment | 11-17-07 11:21 PM
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8

I consider tinyurl harmful.


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 11-17-07 11:24 PM
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9

Sorry, Ben.


Posted by: TJ | Link to this comment | 11-17-07 11:26 PM
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10

I've always had a fondness for GiganticURL, myself.


Posted by: Josh | Link to this comment | 11-17-07 11:30 PM
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11

Redemption?


Posted by: TJ | Link to this comment | 11-17-07 11:52 PM
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12

Just this once.


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 11-17-07 11:56 PM
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13

Great mix, apo.


Posted by: ogged | Link to this comment | 11-17-07 11:58 PM
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14

Like they said, great mix. I doubt any lazy DJ could do better.


Posted by: foolishmortal | Link to this comment | 11-18-07 1:24 AM
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15

What is this 'it' that I, in theory, know that I want?


Posted by: Nbarnes | Link to this comment | 11-18-07 1:28 AM
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16

I shouldn't be surprised, but I am. A man from the south, with appreciation of good black music? There goes my shitty prejudice.... I guess the modern country my neighbor insists on blasting while he renovates has fucked with me. It all seems like a reactionary rejection of everything black: even Cash kept a beat. I can't fucking stand it.


Posted by: foolishmortal | Link to this comment | 11-18-07 1:57 AM
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re: 16

A huge amount of 'good black music' was actually made by or in collaboration with white men from the South. A lot of the great soul songwriters of the sixties and early 70s were white southern guys, ditto a lot of the producers and musicians. Think of the 'Muscle Shoals' session groups and production teams, for example [out of the FAME studio, and the Muscle Shoals Sound studio]. Writers like Dan Penn and Spooner Oldham, etc.

A lot of those very same musicians were making records with country musicians at the same time as they were recording with the likes of Aretha Franklin. It's a big shame that sort of cross-fertilization seems largely gone.


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 11-18-07 2:45 AM
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18

Likewise, there's a lot of great country-flavored soul from the 60s and 70s.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 11-18-07 4:25 AM
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re: 18

Yeah. I have one of Bobby Womack's 'country flavoured' R & B albums from the 70s. Unfortunately, only on vinyl. Not sure if it's been reissued on CD.

I am a total Bobby Womack 'fan boy' so one day I'll track down a copy of his 'Bobby Womack goes C & W' [the pure country album he infamously wanted to title "Move over Charley Pride and Give Another Nigger A Chance"].


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 11-18-07 4:33 AM
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20

The singer in Track 2 is not only white, she's Scottish.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 11-18-07 5:22 AM
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re: 20

Yeah, she did at least one album in the late 60s trying to replicate the success of 'Dusty in Memphis'. I have a couple of tracks from that era of her stuff on compilations, but not the 'New Routes' album itself or the other stuff from those sessions.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Atco-Sessions-1969-1972-Lulu/dp/customer-reviews/B000W1N1R6


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 11-18-07 5:38 AM
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Speaking of 'brit soul' stuff from that era, the Rod Stewart stuff he did when he was on Mercury is pretty tremendous too.

Specifically:

http://www.amazon.com/Reason-Believe-Complete-Mercury-Recordings/dp/B0000793V8


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 11-18-07 5:39 AM
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23

Nice mixture of familiar and unfamiliar artists there. Looking forward to listen to it.


Posted by: Martin Wisse | Link to this comment | 11-18-07 6:21 AM
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24

I am shaking my ass already.


Posted by: m. leblanc | Link to this comment | 11-18-07 10:29 AM
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25

Huh. That might be Parkinson's.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 11-18-07 11:10 AM
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26

Apo, the mix is great, and a big help with moving. Thanks.


Posted by: Megan | Link to this comment | 11-18-07 11:55 AM
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Apo, the mix is great, and a big help with moving.

Yeah, it's practically impossible not to move with great music like that!


Posted by: M/tch M/lls | Link to this comment | 11-18-07 1:16 PM
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28

yeah `me too'. Seriously fun Apo, I haven't heard some of that for ages.


Posted by: soup biscuit | Link to this comment | 11-18-07 1:31 PM
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29

Great Mix.

ZOMG time machine Elvis sounds just like Hiatt.


Posted by: md 20/400 | Link to this comment | 11-18-07 2:54 PM
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30

Why'd I have to blow my load on w-lfs-n's mixtape thread when I could have ridden the unfunkked train?

Booty: too loose.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 11-18-07 3:04 PM
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30 maybe should have said something about "and posted my mix" in their someplace, but what the hell, take it however you want.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 11-18-07 3:04 PM
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32


thanx


Posted by: | Link to this comment | 11-18-07 3:06 PM
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33

Whose someplace, Tweets?


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 11-18-07 3:10 PM
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34

Sorry that should have been "they're someplace".

You know, them.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 11-18-07 3:11 PM
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35

Unfogged mixtapes are my only source of new music these days.


Posted by: Jim Sligh | Link to this comment | 11-18-07 6:04 PM
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36

Your new music is old.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 11-18-07 6:05 PM
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37

Then I tell you, Jim Sligh, that new the Einstürzende Neubauten album, Alles wieder offen, is really good.

Much easier to listen to than Unglaublicher Lärm or the like, too.


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 11-18-07 6:12 PM
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38

Your new music is old.

The best kind.


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 11-18-07 6:28 PM
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39

PK says, "Mama, I hate you! But you know what I do love? This music!"


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 11-18-07 6:35 PM
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40


lullaby for ogged


Posted by: read | Link to this comment | 11-18-07 6:40 PM
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41

39: Man, kids do love the funk. I got a lot of emails from parents after I posted the first one.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 11-18-07 6:56 PM
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42

СПАСИБО!!!!!!! :-)


Posted by: Veengar | Link to this comment | 11-18-07 6:57 PM
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43

Tangentially, on the subject of old music, I've been thinking about "California Dreaming."

I was impressed by that song when I saw it performed in the Monterey Pop Festival film. The performance was touching and it made me think that the song was about the dreams (casual or not so casual) about escaping from the bonds of relationships and community.

The key lyrics for that interpretation are "If I didn't tell her I could leave today" with the implied "but I would have to tell her, so I'll never leave." and "You know the preacher likes the cold / He knows I'm gonna stay." Which is the point in the song at which the narrator acknowledges that they won't leave, and that their current life may be chilly, but it is their life.

Looking up that documentary today, I notice that it was the second to last performance by the Mamas and the Papas before they broke up, and I wonder how much that influenced their performance of the song.

That performance is so compelling to me that I now here the original as sad, but I wonder if that is a reasonably interpretation of the song.

I also note that the IMDB trivia page for the movie contains an number of interesting details about the nature of the music business at that time. It's impressive to me that you could The Who, Jimmi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Otis Redding, etc . . . to perform at a festival without paying any of them.


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 11-18-07 10:50 PM
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re: 43

It's impressive to me that you could The Who, Jimmi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Otis Redding, etc . . . to perform at a festival without paying any of them.

Maybe some of the time, but The Who notoriously didn't go on at Woodstock until the middle of the night because of an argument about whether they would get paid.

re: 41

What's not to love about the funk? My little brother, when he was really small, liked anything with a huge beat. That meant funk, techno and also, strangely, big symphonic music [Beethoven's 5th, that sort of thing].


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 11-19-07 12:21 AM
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45

ttaM I was thinking of you when I made my latest mix. Apparently, I was actually thinking of your little brother when he was small, but anyhow.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 11-19-07 12:25 AM
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46

Heheh.

These days he likes bland generic R & B and hip-hop [and given the hip-hop that's in the mainstream, not particularly good hip-hop, mostly], so his taste has largely not improved.


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 11-19-07 12:29 AM
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47

On the road to Greenville, NC, last night I discovered I had an entire w-lfs-n radio show on my iPod. It helped me not get laid.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 11-19-07 12:31 AM
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48

My little brother, when he was really small, liked anything with a huge beat. That meant funk, techno and also, strangely, big symphonic music [Beethoven's 5th, that sort of thing].

Your little brother's new favorite song


Posted by: Martin van Buren | Link to this comment | 11-19-07 12:32 AM
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49

re: 48

He'd probably like that, yeah. And it is a really clever mix. My nephew [rather than my brother] was/is a big fan of 'My Humps'.


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 11-19-07 12:34 AM
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48, 49: The Alanis Morissette version still cracks me the fuck up.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 11-19-07 12:37 AM
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51

47: which one?


Posted by: ben w-lfs-n | Link to this comment | 11-19-07 12:40 AM
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51: July 3rd or March 7th, 2007, judging by the date.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 11-19-07 12:44 AM
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Maybe some of the time, but The Who notoriously didn't go on at Woodstock until the middle of the night ...

Sure, it was still a business. I just get the sense that it was a more casual business at that point. That may be unjustified nostalgia. Barry Gordy and Motown, for example, were as ruthless as anyone in the music business now.

But who doesn't smile at something like this:

The film was originally intended to be a television special to be shown on ABC. However, several ABC executives objected to much of the footage, especially the blatant sexuality of Jimi Hendrix's performance. In fact, Thomas W. Moore threw up his hands and said, "Not on my network" after viewing the footage.

Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 11-19-07 9:31 AM
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41: That's because kids haven't been programmed to like bad music yet, so they go with their guts.

Somewhere or other I've got a bunch of old organ jazz from 45's I should dig up for a mix. Same effect.


Posted by: soup biscuit | Link to this comment | 11-19-07 9:34 AM
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(that wasn't to suggest all funk is good. Just that you can `get' good funk immediately.)


Posted by: soup biscuit | Link to this comment | 11-19-07 9:35 AM
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I was thinking a little bit more about the Monterey Pop Festival, and the music business, and it started me thinking about the question of when "culture" became "pop culture."

Obviously, at some point in time "culture" meant the people that one lived with and the community that one lived in more than media.

Two anecdotes: (1) It was said that Harry Smith could, as a party trick, tell what county someone grew up based on listening to them speak. (2) My dad told me a story a couple of months ago about a conversation with guests from (IIRC) Korea who talked at some point about how traditional Korean culture was being displaced by global pop culture (particularly American -- "music, movies, microcode"). To which my dad replied that traditional American culture has also been displaced by pop culture. It isn't, really, that a local American culture has taken over the world, but that folk culture everywhere has been displaced by a pop culture that happens to be based in America.

Thinking about it 1967 seems like a time when that shift was happening, but hadn't become obvious yet. So when did that shift really happen?

Obviously the answer is probably that people have been complaining about the decline of folk culture since time immoral, but my dimestore sense of American history is that the post-war ere really started it.

In the 50s you have the explosion of the suburbs, the construction of the Interstate highway system, and TV starting to replace radio and movies as the iconic cultural media. I would also imagine that WW II both brought people from a variety of locals together, and resulted in mass migrations around the country as people left to go to war from somewhere, and came back to go somewhere else (either to college, to the suburbs, or to the West Coast/SouthWest which experienced a dramatic post-war boom).

So, I hypothesize, that the 50's which are so often referenced as a decade of a rooted, traditional American culture, was actually the point at which the shift away from culture as rooted and local became inevitable.



Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 11-19-07 11:45 AM
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