Re: Surf's Down

1

Same charge, and slightly more explanatory, but still not very:

The Shadows were very influential in the rest of the world, which at that point was still more affected by the British culture than the American culture. Especially in Europe, where hundreds if not thousands of bands sprung up between '61 and '63 with dreams of sounding just like The Shadows. The Beatles obliterated all that in England and Europe, just as they killed instrumental surf music (or really all other instrumental rock except The Ventures) in the USA. [Editor's note: Although The Ventures' survival was due more to the groups' strong worldwide fan base, especially in Japan, The Beatles, in fact, eliminated The Ventures from mainstream radio.]


Posted by: M/tch M/lls | Link to this comment | 07-11-09 11:36 PM
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I think the basic idea is that surf rock was the Big Thing in the very early 60s, but then when the Beatles came along they (and the style of music they repopularized) became the Big Thing and no one cared about surf rock any more.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 07-11-09 11:39 PM
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In other words, the surf rockers felt that they were right on the cusp of world domination when the Beatles showed up and ruined it all.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 07-11-09 11:42 PM
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But what about the Beach Boys? I'm confused about this argument that teo seems to be doing an honest and admirable attempt to make on the surf rockers' behalf.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 07-11-09 11:44 PM
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I think the idea (and I'm venturing into very uncertain territory here) is that the Beach Boys were prevented from reaching the levels of stardom they could have by the presence of the Beatles. That is, if the Beatles hadn't been there and surf rock had continued its upward progress, the Beach Boys would have claimed the position in rock and roll that the Beatles ended up with. Either that or the Beach Boys don't count as "pure" surf rock for some reason, maybe because their style was corrupted by Beatles-esque rock.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 07-11-09 11:46 PM
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Did the band you saw play any Beach Boys?


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 07-11-09 11:47 PM
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(The argument I'm making here is basically that surf rockers are delusional, hubristic crazy people.)


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 07-11-09 11:49 PM
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(No offense to any surf rockers in the audience, of course.)


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 07-11-09 11:49 PM
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6: Good point, there. Nope. I've heard the Beach-Boys-are-better-than-the-Beatles thing from other angles, including Pet Sounds being released too late or something. I don't really have a dog in the race, so I'm mostly amused by the different camps and their different narratives.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 07-11-09 11:51 PM
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Why did you go to this concert, anyway?


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 07-11-09 11:52 PM
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I think there's a distinction usually drawn between surf rock a la e.g. The Ventures vs. surf pop a la e.g. The Beach Boys. The Beach Boys had many songs about surfing, but didn't really have that reverby guitar-heavy surf rock sound


Posted by: M/tch M/lls | Link to this comment | 07-11-09 11:54 PM
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11 seems to support the second arguments in 5. I suspect there are camps making both arguments, but that the second is more identified with people like the guy Stanley saw perform.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 07-11-09 11:56 PM
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Austin used to have a really good surf rock band called Death Valley. They did this awesome cover of "Our Lips Are Sealed".

Laika & the Cosmonauts, from Finland, are a relatively well-known contemporary surf rock band.

I think the genre got the name "surf rock" due to it being centered in So Cal in the early days, not because the songs themselves were necessarily about surfing.


Posted by: M/tch M/lls | Link to this comment | 07-11-09 11:58 PM
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It's not that the Beach Boys weren't pure surf rock or had their sound corrupted by the Beatles. They never really played surf rock to begin with. As I said above, "surf rock" does not equal "songs about surfing".


Posted by: M/tch M/lls | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 12:01 AM
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Why did you go to this concert, anyway?

Roommates said, "Hey, come on. Get off the goddamn internet for awhile."


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 12:04 AM
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Fair enough. I do think that makes it even less plausible to believe that surf rock was about to take over the world of music until the Beatles got in the way, but it makes it more plausible to believe that that's what the surf rockers think.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 12:04 AM
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15: And do you regret your mistake?


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 12:04 AM
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5 is an example of lamentably non-dialectical thinking.


Posted by: Bave Dee | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 12:05 AM
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Golly. I was there. This is a very good question, and maybe impossible to explain to someone who wasn't there, or who didn't completely immerse themselves in early 60s music, but the Beatles were serious. I remember the exact moment in the kitchen when "Twist & Shout" came on the radio...quantum leap, dude.

Maybe (I'm working hard on this) one thing you can do is to compare Carole King's versions of some of the songs on Tapestry to the original girlgroup covers of them. It is a matter of personal expression vs performance.

As silly as "I Saw Her Standing There" mght sound today, at the time it sounded real authentic personal in a way "Peggy Sue" did not. Only country (Hank Williams) and the blues allowed that kind of space.

Not only surf music but the Brill building died with the Beatles. Before Dylan, the Beatles moved the song into a vehicle for personal emotional narrative.

Of coutrse there is all the musical genius etc, but I think the lyrics just made everything else look silly and featherweight. Everybody got to be a poet.


Posted by: bob mcmanus | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 12:06 AM
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In any case, as Stanley notes in 6, in addition to the anti-Beatles surf rock discourse there seems to be a parallel but apparently independent anti-Beatles surf pop discourse, which holds that the Beach Boys were better than the Beatles and should rightly have been recognized as such but unjustly weren't.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 12:07 AM
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I, of course, don't really know what I'm talking about here at all, so I should probably shut up. I'm mostly just putting off going to bed.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 12:09 AM
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I think the general idea is more that there were a string of hit singles in the surf rock genre from various bands in the early sixties, and it looked to be growing in popularity. Then the British Invasion happened, it was incredibly popular, and surf rock basically dropped off the charts. The result: less radio play, fewer performance venues, fewer record deals, and thus fewer and fewer surf bands and less new surf rock produced.

I mean, I wasn't at the concert Stanley attended, so maybe this particular guy does think that some particular surf rock band or artist would have been as big as the Beatles if not for those bastard fab four. But I think the garden variety "the Beatles killed surf" argument is much less grand than that.


Posted by: M/tch M/lls | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 12:12 AM
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17: I regret not requesting this song.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 12:12 AM
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I think the general idea is more that there were a string of hit singles in the surf rock genre from various bands in the early sixties, and it looked to be growing in popularity. Then the British Invasion happened, it was incredibly popular, and surf rock basically dropped off the charts. The result: less radio play, fewer performance venues, fewer record deals, and thus fewer and fewer surf bands and less new surf rock produced.

This is basically what I was arguing, actually. There was some hyperbole, admittedly, but I don't actually think the surf rockers think they could have been as big as the Beatles.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 12:14 AM
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22 to 16.


Posted by: M/tch M/lls | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 12:15 AM
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And now I really should go to bed. Much as I hate to admit it to myself, I do have to work tomorrow.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 12:16 AM
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26: Be sure to eat a good breakfast in the morning.


Posted by: M/tch M/lls | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 12:17 AM
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1) Beach Boys, Jan & Dean.

"Little Old Lady From Pasedena" "Fun Fun Fun"

The Beach Boys were great fun, but rarely serious, and IMO, when Brian tried gravitas...I don't know "God Only Knows" is good but "I Wasn't Made for This World" is just a little embarrassing. Tryin too hard.

Real "Surf Music" Like Wray and Dale and one of my favourites, The Fireballs with Jimmy Gilmer?
Jazz, man. Peaked with the peak of jazz and died with jazz. But very limited, and barely bothered to explore what the instruments could do. Wray vs Hendrix, dude.


Posted by: bob mcmanus | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 12:17 AM
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Was it George Harrison who came back to England after a trip to visit his sister in Chicago (this is pre-Ed Sullivan appearance) and said, basically, "Don't worry, they have nothing like this over there"?


Posted by: Bave Dee | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 12:17 AM
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Was the hit song "Telstar", from Britain, surf rock?


Posted by: Cryptic ned | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 12:18 AM
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I agree with 28 re: The Beach Boys.

But the assertion that Link Wray "barely bothered to explore what the instruments could do" is just crazy talk. Yes, Hendrix, later, took it further. But no Wray, no Hendrix.


Posted by: M/tch M/lls | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 12:20 AM
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Jazz, man. Peaked with the peak of jazz and died with jazz.

There's probably something to this. It was genuinely awkward when a song had lyrics. "Dude, just keep playing," I thought.

Few are the jazz vocalists. Maybe it's about vocals?


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 12:21 AM
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Maybe it's about vocals?

Well, I think so, I think the Beatles turned the song, or rediscovered the song, as an expressive art rather than performative.

There is so much performing art that is very very good that I don't want to criticize it too heavily. But everybody talks about the Beatles energy and enthusiasm and that means they were really really into the fucking song. Like they were singing more for themselves than for the audience.

It is really hard to explain or describe, but check out the progression on Dylan's first few albums. His delivery changes, and you no longer feel he is singing to an audience.

"I Want to Hold Your Hand" is sung to a particular girl, every time it's sung. And they aren't acting.

I tried the great Sinatra/riddle albums, and they are great, but Sinatra was always acting. Beatles were like Brando. They made it real.


Posted by: bob mcmanus | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 12:56 AM
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Given that the Beatles also killed pop, I think there's a pattern emerging here...


Posted by: Keir | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 1:04 AM
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The Beach Boys were sekritly better than the Beatles claim also gets the ordering wrong. Wilson wrote Pet Sounds specifically as a response to the Beatles. He talks in interviews about how inspired he had been by Rubber Soul (and also by the Ronettes) and how he was trying to take on board the sorts of writing and production that he was hearing from them. The stuff that we take, today, as being the pinnacle of Wilson and the Beach Boys output wouldn't have happened at all if it wasn't for the Beatles.

Good surf guitar music is great, though. There's quite a bit of surf revival stuff around. Los Straitjackets are great.


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 3:20 AM
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Man or Astroman also does good surf rock.

One of my lit professors theorized that it helps in being expressive when you're inspired by works not familiar to your audience. There may be something to that - if you can get outside a lot of expectations, it's easier to do something new and personal.


Posted by: Ceri B. | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 4:23 AM
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It was Jimi. He confessed in Third Stone from the Sun.


Posted by: CharleyCarp | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 5:33 AM
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Although your world wonders me,
With your majestic and superior cackling hen
Your people I do not understand,
So to you I shall put an end
And you'll
Never hear
Surf music again


Posted by: JH | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 5:35 AM
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Posted by: | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 5:44 AM
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35 gets it exactly right.


Posted by: M/tch M/lls | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 6:25 AM
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Data point: Telstar may be the greatest song of all time. And I don't even like surf rock!

I thought the description in 35 was sort of what surf rock people were complaining about; all the surf bands and proto-surf bands were so excited about the false idol of the Beatles that they started hiking their guitars up way high and burning their reverb pedals, and thus was Eden lost.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 6:29 AM
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Posted by: | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 6:39 AM
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You guys sure are up early.


Posted by: M/tch M/lls | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 7:09 AM
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re: 41

Maybe. I don't think surf was much more than a minority genre even then, though. If it wasn't killed by British invasion pop, it'd have been killed by Motown, and the rise of soul and RnB, or by the slightly later British blues boom and heavy rock, or by Dylan, ... etc. ad infinitum.

Instrumental pop music in general was already on its way out by the time the Beatles came along anyway. In the late 40s and 50s there were million selling instrumental superstars in genres other than surf. Johnny Smith sold millions of copies of 'Moonlight in Vermont', Les Paul (with Mary Ford) was huge, big bands and small-group jazz was popular, Western swing groups were superstars, etc. They were all already fading long before British invasion pop hit.


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 7:15 AM
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Tweety,

When's the big day? How long are you guys gonna be in this area? Are you coming back for a bit post honeymoon?


Posted by: Bostoniangirl | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 7:16 AM
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What the guy is saying is utterly the conventional wisdom about what happened to surf rock. The conventional story is that surf rock completely dominated the charts, and then the Beatles blew them away. It's not a Beatles versus Beach Boys story -- there were a bunch of other acts that ceased to be popular.

I'm sure that if you look at the actual charts it looks much more complicated.


Posted by: Walt Someguy | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 8:10 AM
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Here are The Shadows doing "Apache" back in the day. The video is somewhat blurry, but worth watching for the cigarette action at 2:30.


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 8:26 AM
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re: 47

The odd bit is how 'Apache' later came, via a cover version, to be hugely influential in the nascent hip-hop scene in the early/mid 70s.


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 8:34 AM
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I'm sure that if you look at the actual charts it looks much more complicated.

Next you'll be wanting us to read the articles linked in the posts.


Posted by: JRoth | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 8:35 AM
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Posted by: | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 8:46 AM
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Ah, the inimitable Jet Harris.


Posted by: OFE | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 8:46 AM
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Posted by: | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 8:48 AM
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48: odd only if you don't recognize the centrality of Michael Viner's Incredible Bongo Band to all music before or since.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 8:52 AM
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That concert sounds interesting. I would have enjoyed it.


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 9:37 AM
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There used to be a video on youtube of Misirlou which started out all in darkness, with just a glint off the head of an electric guitar. It was sweet! But I can't find it anymore.


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 9:41 AM
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What that be this one?


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 9:45 AM
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Yessssssss.


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 9:48 AM
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Here's my secret research technique: Perform this search and click on the first result. I'm thinking of developing a course.

(Daring to snark after writing "what" for "would"!)


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 9:56 AM
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I don't have permission to access /2001/tma1/wav/feelit.wav on that server.

I did search, on youtube itself, you jerk.


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 9:58 AM
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59.1: Hmmm, interesting. Here's the page it is from.


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 10:05 AM
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I did search, on youtube itself

That second bit is your problem right there. Unless things have changed recently, doing a Google search with "site:youtube.com" or just "youtube" in your search terms is more effective than using YouTube's own search.


Posted by: Josh | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 10:23 AM
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That, and the fact that, since the preview image isn't the image I was thinking of from the beginning, I didn't recognize it even though it was the second hit.


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 10:25 AM
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The Cro Magnon track "Habemus Pampam" (should be "Papam") has a little surf guitar interlude, and all the music of Forever Einstein and Vril is indebted to surf guitar. Fact!


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 10:35 AM
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"Misirlou" has an interesting history.


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 10:50 AM
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One of my lit professors theorized that it helps in being expressive when you're inspired by works not familiar to your audience. There may be something to that - if you can get outside a lot of expectations, it's easier to do something new and personal.

That is a fascinating comment. It makes sense, but I wouldn't have thought about that. Do you think that it means that it helps "to be expressive" or "to appear expressive"? I would imagine that if the artist is working with a sense of structure that they audience doesn't perceive, that it would make the audience more attentive to the emotional content of the work, but not necessarily make the work more emotional for the artist.


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 11:07 AM
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183

||

Horrifying news of the day: Hollywood contemplates the despoilation of John D. MacDonald's Travis McGee.

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/news/arts/la-ca-travis12-2009jul12,0,7793187.story?page=1

|>


Posted by: Biohazard | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 11:15 AM
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Horrifying news of the day: Hollywood contemplates the despoilation of John D. MacDonald's Travis McGee.

Time for LB to break out the orange post titles again.


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 11:22 AM
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Heh. I wonder if they're going to keep up with the 'Whoops, my girlfriend was just killed by a freak Bulgarian assassination method/direct hit from explosion shrapnel/brain cancer/head injury that she actually survived but that means she doesn't like me anymore/meteor strike/superintelligent extraterrestrial fungus/wild dogs/Nazi frogmen" theme. Based on the books, they could run through five or six female leads in a two-hour movie.


Posted by: LizardBreath | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 11:26 AM
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The role of the Byrds is missing in some of the above. By electrifying Dylan, they paved the way for some of what you hear on Rubber Soul. Their "Mr. Tambourine Man" came out in the summer of '65; the Beatles recorded Rubber Soul in the fall. Dave Crosby is actually the person who introduced Harrison to classical Indian music as well.


Posted by: Criminally Bulgur | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 12:26 PM
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68: The Starsky's Girlfriend/Red Shirt Syndrome? I'm going to like them anyway 'cause in one story, when Travis needed some expertise in psychedelics, MacD mentions by name people I used to work with at Einstein.


Posted by: Biohazard | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 12:32 PM
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Oh, I liked the books a lot. I can't imagine a movie not sucking, though, or if not sucking at least being a fairly interchangeable shoot-em-up -- most of what was interesting was McGee rambling about stuff, and that's hard to do in a movie (My Dinner with Meyer?).


Posted by: LizardBreath | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 12:48 PM
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35: The stuff that we take, today, as being the pinnacle of Wilson and the Beach Boys output wouldn't have happened at all if it wasn't for the Beatles.

Undoubtedly true, but of course there certainly was the reverse influence as well as both tried to push the envelope. Here is a passage describing some of the influence of Pet Sounds on The Beatles. But unquestionably Wilson and The Beachboys were a distant second in the "competition".


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 12:51 PM
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64: With a back story like that, Misirlou was probably our best chance at world peace. Too bad the fucking Beatles killed surf-rock.


Posted by: Hamilton-Lovecraft | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 1:10 PM
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Well, I think so, I think the Beatles turned the song, or rediscovered the song, as an expressive art rather than performative. ... Everybody talks about the Beatles energy and enthusiasm and that means they were really really into the fucking song. Like they were singing more for themselves than for the audience. ... I tried the great Sinatra/riddle albums, and they are great, but Sinatra was always acting. Beatles were like Brando. They made it real.

I've been thinking about this for a while, and I'm not sure. I absolutely agree that Sinatra is overtly theatrical/stagey, but I'm not sure that I believe that dichotemy acurately describes the way in which the Beatles were revolutionary.

I mean the Beatles feel very stagey to me compared to the Everly Brothers. Or, thinking about Country music, what about Hank Williams or Jimmie Rodgers? Both of them seem very expressive.


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 2:20 PM
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Posted by: | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 3:57 PM
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re: 72

Yeah, McCartney has talked about the influence of Pet Sounds on him. It was reciprocal. I can't see that passage, btw. I don't think it's available from a UK IP.

I mean the Beatles feel very stagey to me compared to the Everly Brothers.

That's just crazy talk.


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 4:18 PM
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Have I mentioned here before (obviously I could check but I won't, 'cause I'm crazy like that) seeing the Everly Brothers brought out in the middle of a Simon & Garfunkel set to do a few numbers? Their voices have held up remarkably well.


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 4:24 PM
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re: 75

Heh, I didn't know the Ventures did that, although I've heard their version before. I know it best through two other versions.

First, the original, which is (the great) Johnny Smith.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0HwQxdrmwY8

And second, the John Barry/Vic Flick version, which was, I think, the best known version in the UK. Vic Flick is, famously, the guitar player on the James Bond theme.

The Barry/Flick version is here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nn1GArGX8PY


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 4:30 PM
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Those are some reverby drums.


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 4:32 PM
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Smith, btw, is a total legend, especially since he more or less disappeared after 1960:

http://classicjazzguitar.com/artists/artists_page.jsp?artist=29

Among many Smith stories, he was famously parachuted into some premiere/recording of a Schoenberg piece where a famous classical guitarist had been struggling to get something down for a couple of days. Smith sight read it.


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 4:43 PM
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The story here:

http://blacktorrent.blogspot.com/2006/11/you-could-only-hope-to-live-in-ivywild.html

[re: Schoenberg, etc]


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 4:47 PM
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Posted by: | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 4:47 PM
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Posted by: | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 4:53 PM
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Posted by: | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 5:03 PM
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Nobody brought up Dick Dale yet?


Posted by: | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 5:04 PM
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re: 85

Apart from the discussion of, and links to videos of, Misirlou above?


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 5:06 PM
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Posted by: | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 5:09 PM
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While we're at it:

The Chantays on Lawrence Welk with Pipeline and The Surfaris Wipe Out.


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 5:17 PM
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Have I mentioned here before (obviously I could check but I won't, 'cause I'm crazy like that) seeing the Everly Brothers brought out in the middle of a Simon & Garfunkel set to do a few numbers? Their voices have held up remarkably well.

At the United Center?


Posted by: essear | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 5:25 PM
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Posted by: | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 5:25 PM
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What's with the swaying everyone did?


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 5:27 PM
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Posted by: | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 5:48 PM
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Destroyer's "Signs" (audio) to today's threads:

The bird is not the word. Quit being so cryptic with the way you rock and swerve. Remove your shoes, panic ensues. Nothing left to do. If you don't believe in recompense, who will fix the fence for you?

Don't wanna clear the floor anymore. Her interests are classical at best. Bested modern times, modern minds. Signs, signs, everywhere signs.

Actually, I'm rather meh about City of Daughters.


Posted by: essear | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 5:55 PM
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Dick Dale has been mentioned, but not I think
Jerry Cole


Posted by: bob mcmanus | Link to this comment | 07-12-09 6:26 PM
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I mean the Beatles feel very stagey to me compared to the Everly Brothers.

That's just crazy talk.

Yeah, it is crazy talk. I admit to not being a Beatles fan, but the strongest case I could make would be that some Everly Brothers' songs are more expressive than some Beatles albums (for example, the last time I listened to Sgt Pepper I found it unbelievably stiff).

[I also see that Bob had already mentioned Hank Williams and I missed it.]

What made me think of the Everly Brothers, however, was Bob's line about, "they were singing more for themselves than for the audience." The best Everly Brothers songs definitely make me believe that they find the song emotionally moving.


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 07-13-09 9:30 AM
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The best Everly Brothers songs definitely make me believe that they find the song emotionally moving.

I also think this is true of some of the 50s stuff by Elvis, and also many rockabilly stars of that era.


Posted by: M/tch M/lls | Link to this comment | 07-13-09 10:15 AM
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Posted by: | Link to this comment | 07-13-09 11:12 AM
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Comment 98 is not by me.


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 07-13-09 11:22 AM
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This does mean, of course, the if the bloglords delete the original comment #98, my previous comment will become both self-referential and false.


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 07-13-09 11:22 AM
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101
Posted by: | Link to this comment | 07-13-09 11:23 AM
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102
Posted by: | Link to this comment | 07-13-09 11:29 AM
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103

Likewise original 101. Although note strategic misspelling.


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 07-13-09 11:31 AM
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104

You are now obligated to post as Stormcow when commenting drunk.


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 07-13-09 11:34 AM
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105

104: From my frat house.


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 07-13-09 11:41 AM
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106

Ok, Stevie Ray Vaughn + Dick Dale just blew my mind, and not just for Dick Dale's hair circa 1987.


Posted by: Spike | Link to this comment | 07-13-09 9:04 PM
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107

That is surprisingly great.

Have you listened to any of the sessions with (a very young) Stevie Ray Vaughn and Albert King?


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 07-14-09 9:31 AM
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