Re: They Have Their Good Points

1

Hooray, titties competent kids and vacation!


Posted by: Awl | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 7:35 AM
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I'm at home with the kids today because it's a teacher workday, after having them solo from dinnertime Thursday through to 8:00 last night while Roberta was out of town. I'm... ready to go back to work now.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 8:14 AM
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That's very sweet of them, and you should probably buy each of them a new iPod or something.

Homemade cocktail sauce is one of those jarred things I wouldn't have thought to make fresh. Clicking through a few recipes suggests something like ketchup (or tomato paste) +horseradish + hot sauce is the general idea. Speaking of which, I was shocked to learn that some horseradish sauce is basically horseradish + mayo.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 8:26 AM
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I'm reading comment 2 in a tiny voice that also says "help meeeee"


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 8:34 AM
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Grandma called and gave Jammies and me a big lecture last night about parking our kids in daycare. In her defense, she is very egalitarian about her solution, that both of us work halftime.

But she wanted to be on speaker phone, and she didn't want to be interrupted, and Hawaiian Punch was going fucking nuts with the cell phone being held out right in front of her but she wasn't allowed to touch it.

Wheeee. I think we'll both continue working fulltime.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 8:43 AM
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Zounds! Sally went to the Renaissance Faire? Did she eat a turkey leg on a stick, forsooth?


Posted by: snarkout | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:07 AM
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Awwwww... how sweet! I look forward to the time our kids can do this (and the housework). By the way, if any has suggestions for a boy's name, let 'em rip. We can't think of one we like.


Posted by: W. Breeze | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:13 AM
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I hear "Matt Weiner" is available.


Posted by: Eggplant | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:14 AM
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7 -- my kid's preschool has a "Balthazar" and a "Guilhelm.". People are reaching beyond the old fashioned name trend and going straight up medieval.

Also, there are two other kids with her (so I thought) not super ordinary first name.


Posted by: Robert Halford | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:17 AM
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I hear "Matt Weiner" is available.

Also available.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:20 AM
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9: In the past couple of years, the two boys' names that were each given to at least two babies of my acquaintance are "Kai" and "Dashiell."


Posted by: oudemia | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:21 AM
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11 -- those are the most common boy names at the preschool.


Posted by: Robert Halford | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:26 AM
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We're going with Miles. I can't shake the feeling that we're completely mid-fad on this one.

Name Voyager confirms we're being somewhat faddish. I still have a sinking feeling.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:26 AM
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But feel free to use it!


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:26 AM
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Rank in 2009: 162. I can't tell how pervasive the 162nd most popular name would feel.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:28 AM
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13: Strike a note for the metric system, and go with Kilometers instead.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:29 AM
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We'll call him three-fifths.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:30 AM
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7: I've always rather liked "Victor" and I don't think it's trendy right now.

Even better, go old school Maya and name him "18 Rabbit." Betcha nobody else is naming their kid that.


Posted by: togolosh | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:30 AM
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17: It's a compromise!


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:31 AM
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I learned this weekend that a couple I know who have a son named "Luke" has named their infant son "Bo". I feel this is not OK.

What I find weirdest about the preschool isn't just the presence of weird names, but the near total absence of what I think of as "normal" names. It's about 5/50 who have names that wouldn't have seemed highly unusual in the 1970s/80s.


Posted by: Robert Halford | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:35 AM
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20: This is why the Snark-kit is ahead of the curve.


Posted by: oudemia | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:37 AM
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All of the boys in my son's class have what I would call normal names. By that, I mean names that are shared by people I knew when I was little.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:38 AM
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It's totally true there are no Toms, Dicks, or Harrys any more. But naming is a minefield -- there is so much signalling involved! Don't want to be too common, but not pretentious either. Don't want it to sound made up or people will think you're from the lower classes (the horror!!!)


Posted by: W. Breeze | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:39 AM
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That's pretty impressive. Aren't they elementary school age?

but the near total absence of what I think of as "normal" names.

Earlier this year I realized that the name "Jennifer" has disappeared. When I was a kid there was a Jennifer in every class, sometimes two. Now I can't recall the last time I encountered a woman younger than, say, thirty-ish, named Jennifer.


Posted by: Populuxe | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:40 AM
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I know of two "Miles" under 5. It's a great name, though I could never use it b/c it reminds me of my days of heavy air travel.


Posted by: Robert Halford | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:40 AM
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25: You listen to jazz when you fly also?


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:41 AM
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there is so much signalling involved!

Fuck it. Don't overthink it. Jammies and I both have bizarrely mis-signalling names and you turn out just fine.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:42 AM
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Actually the other boy name that I like is "Van", so maybe I've got travelling on the brain.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:43 AM
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The only friends I know who've had babies recently have gone with very Irish names, but then they are Irish.* Although the Irishness** of the names was a bit of a surprise since neither of them are particularly into the sorts of things I'd associate with that.


* as in born and brought up in Ireland, not as in 'have ancestors who left there 150 years ago' ...

** not quite Fionn mac Cumhaill Brian Boru Smith, but pretty Irish all the same.


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:43 AM
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I think the theory is that even a common name doesn't feel common anymore the way Jennifer did. It's partly going to be a question of how things shake out in your particular locale (like how I went to grade school with Lori Ka. and Lori Ke. in my class but there were no other Loris within three grades in either direction) but I don't think Miles seems overly hipsterish and fits with his sister (though maybe gives you an obligation to stick with alphabetical order?) well.


Posted by: Thorn | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:45 AM
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The next frontier is name portmanteaus: Dylandy, Jennifenna, Lukarl, Henriettaturkmenbasiobhan. That kind of thing.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:46 AM
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27: My name signals very accurately.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:46 AM
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Now I can't recall the last time I encountered a woman younger than, say, thirty-ish, named Jennifer.

If this is accurate I must have been right in the last gasp of this trend. I attended a high school brimming with Jennifers. (See also: girls named Lauren.)


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:48 AM
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In real life, Moby is named Shiva. Mods pls delete.


Posted by: Eggplant | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:48 AM
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29: Boru/Boroimhe is already chosen to be our next dog's name.
Americans went gaga for Celtic (mostly Irish) names starting about 15 or 20 years back. I know a baby Euan now, so I'm just waiting for the ensuing crop of Alasdairs and Mungos.


Posted by: oudemia | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:48 AM
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turn out just fine

Oh?


Posted by: lw | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:49 AM
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34: A friend (of WASPy extraction) was named Kali by his parents, but this made his grandmother cry, so they changed it to Kylie.


Posted by: oudemia | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:51 AM
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Indian friends of mine named their kid Aryan. We tactfully waited until our eyes stopped bulging before hemming and hawing about loaded words. They cheerfully said that they'd just call him Ryan for short. Now when I meet anyone named Ryan I like to ask them if it's short for Aryan.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:53 AM
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37: And now grandma is angry past tears?


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:53 AM
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re: 35

Obviously the Celtic thing codes a bit differently for me, as I always had friends growing up with names like Mhairi, Angus, Alasdair, and so on. However, the more ostentatiously Celtic names, with the full orthographic monty, became more common a while back, yeah.


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:53 AM
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but I don't think Miles seems overly hipsterish and fits with his sister

Thanks! Good. I think it fits nicely too.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:54 AM
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MUNGO SMASH!


Posted by: OPINIONATED BABY MUNGO | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:54 AM
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Mungo is only pawn in game of life.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:55 AM
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You'd think Rickastley would be climbing the charts as a first name, but I haven't heard much about it.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:56 AM
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I met a baby named Miles just yesterday!


Posted by: redfoxtailshrub | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:56 AM
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Sigh.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:57 AM
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Now when I meet anyone named Ryan I like to ask them if it's short for Aryan.

I've done this with people named Tim, ever since getting on familiar terms with Optimus Prime.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:57 AM
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40: Oh sure. Yeah, the names I am talking about are bog (ha!) standard over there. Even CA (Colin) was the only so-named kid in his middle school -- now you can't throw at rock into an American playground without hitting a Colin or two.


Posted by: oudemia | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:58 AM
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24 -- It was the most popular name when we picked it in 1986.

7 -- Hussein. What?


Posted by: CharleyCarp | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 9:58 AM
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If you named him "Mungo" you could say "Park Mungo on the sofa over there."


Posted by: Populuxe | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:00 AM
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I know small kids named Copper (short for Co/pern/icus) and Sid (short for Sid/dha/rtha). They're also friends with a Kepler.


Posted by: Sir Kraab | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:00 AM
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48: Even if you don't hit a single Colin, the teacher will still call the cops.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:00 AM
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re: 48

Yeah, although most of my school friends probably had fairly normal British names, rather than anything particularly Scottish. But there was always a smattering of Callums, and Anguses and the like.


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:01 AM
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There's another astronomically themed kid name in their cohort, but damned if I can remember what it is. (Not Galileo in any event.)


Posted by: Sir Kraab | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:01 AM
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I always like the name Hamish, but we aren't Scottish so I didn't feel like we could use it.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:02 AM
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54: Uranus?


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:02 AM
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W. Breeze, you should start a new trend in the U.S. with Angus.


Posted by: Sir Kraab | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:02 AM
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56: Ha ha. So funny I forgot to laugh.


Posted by: Sir Kraab | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:03 AM
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31: I once suggested Turkmebashi when a friend was looking for baby names! The kid's mom was a Turkmenne and found this non-hilarious.

35: If I get another cat (supposing mine doesn't live forever, which I'm counting on) I think I'm naming it Meeskeit.


Posted by: Mister Smearcase | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:03 AM
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I've always thought that going for musicality, which is to say, aesthetic pleasingness, in the combination of first name and surname made the most sense. That doesn't provide an easy answer, but it does rule out quite a bit.

I tend not to be fan, for example, of assonance or alliteration. So a Dashiell Hampton, say, would lose points, as would a Kai Kramer.* Also, I'd mix up the number of syllables in first name + last name: one syllable + one syllable, less favored.

I'm sure people think of these things, but I feel as though I hear discussions of name-choosing conducted on the basis of the first name to be chosen alone; not as often in consideration of the surname to which said name will be attached.

* I say this as a bearer of a name with notable assonance, and it's always bugged me, just a tad, mind, not horribly.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:03 AM
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re: 55

I went to school with a Hamish, but everyone called him Hammy.


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:03 AM
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I know small kids named Copper (short for Co/pern/icus) and Sid (short for Sid/dha/rtha). They're also friends with a Kepler.

They need to recruit someone to name their kid Brahe. Collect the set!

I know two Kais and a Dashiell (all seven or under). I don't think any of the parents knew they were participating in a fad. "Dash" is a pretty cool nickname.


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:05 AM
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61: Convergence! And how could I forget! Kali/Kylie named his new son Hamish.


Posted by: oudemia | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:06 AM
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W. Breeze, you should start a new trend in the U.S. with Angus.

Then teach the kid to play basketball. Later in life, he'll have beef with Kobe.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:06 AM
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Also if you want to raise a little gay, you can choose an ordinary name and spell it wrong by one letter. Ryun. Kiel. Khris. &c. (I started to say "has anyone noticed this?" but that usually leads to "RTFA!")


Posted by: Mister Smearcase | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:07 AM
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We had about seventy Jennifers at my HS.


Posted by: Turgid Jacobian | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:07 AM
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58: Low hanging fruit. What did you expect?


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:07 AM
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We had a lot of Jennifers. They were all Asian.


Posted by: Eggplant | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:10 AM
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one syllable + one syllable, less favored

I don't know, "Rip Torn" is an awesome name.


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:12 AM
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There's really nothing as good as watching your kids be competent.

It has been a long wait for Ma and Pa Smearcase but I'm sure it will be so much the sweeter it when it happens.


Posted by: Mister Smearcase | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:13 AM
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According to the SSA, Jennifer was the #1 name from 1971 to 1984, and is currently #109.

My son's kindergarten has four Ryans, none of whom are Irish.


Posted by: Mr. Blandings | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:14 AM
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It's too late for heebie to take advantage of this, but one thing I've seen a lot in foster-adoption files is boys named for someone who turned out not to be the biological father, which I've seen far more often than namesake boys who are named for their actual dads. (And I hope that doesn't sound classist; I'd be utterly shocked if it's unique to the people who end up not able to parent their children but they are the ones whose files I get to read. It's actually probably not a bad strategy to encourage the name inspiration to stay/become involved in a relationship with mother and child.)

Colton's real name is basically the equivalent to heebie choosing Jammbie for her kid, smushing together parts of both parents' names. It certainly can lead to unique outcomes, which I suppose is part of the point.

To parsimon's point on assonance, having the same letter used in distinctly different ways seems weird to me. Some football game this weekend featured Julio Jones and that struck me every time I heard it. Presumably that's because I'm weird, though, so it's not necessarily a universal.


Posted by: Thorn | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:15 AM
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My son's kindergarten has four Ryans, none of whom are Irish.

Sez you.


Posted by: Mr. Blandings' Neighborhood Irish Mailman | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:16 AM
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67: I expected you to reach for the very highest branches, Moby.


Posted by: Sir Kraab | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:16 AM
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If I ever had a kid, god forbid, I would totally name it Pain after reading about it in another thread. Bonus it works for either boy or girl and if they had my last name would be one syllable + one syllable.


Posted by: CJB | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:19 AM
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Meg Whitman's husband and son are both named "Griff Harsh."

Dude.


Posted by: oudemia | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:22 AM
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69: Yeah, I know, and there are a lot of other examples -- it's just a personal preference on my part, I think. I've always liked the name Naomi, for example: but "Naomi Cannelli" doesn't work, while, oh, "Naomi Klein" does. I think that's because of the contrast in number of syllables, plus the avoidance of rhyme. Kind of speculating here.

And I shouldn't say it "doesn't work" so much as that it's less pleasing. To me, obviously -- perhaps not for everyone else.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:22 AM
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76: Dude, seriously.


Posted by: Sir Kraab | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:25 AM
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Worst girl name that I have encountered in real life:

"Reagan Lee"

Worst (or weirdest) boy name:

"Yo" (the parents actually recounted this, and after formally naming him "Yo" now call him "Joe").


Posted by: Robert Halford | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:38 AM
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Last year, I had a student named General Lee! He was pretty awesome, too.


Posted by: redfoxtailshrub | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:40 AM
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I keep suggesting "Beppo" to people considering baby names, to no avail.


Posted by: Flippanter | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:43 AM
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Just what was so awesome about that specific Lee?


Posted by: Eggplant | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:44 AM
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Was General Lee Korean?


Posted by: essear | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:45 AM
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I'd also seriously consider the number of ways a name can be shortened to a nickname. I grimaced for too long over the fact that my name basically doesn't admit of nicknames, shortened forms. Names like Elizabeth have a serious advantage here: suppose you grow up not to be a "Beth" so much as an "Eliza"! Or maybe you'd rather be a "Betty."

I mean, now that I'm a grown-up, I don't really care, but during the finding-your-identity period, this was consternating.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:53 AM
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I attended a high school brimming with Jennifers.

Twenty-seven?


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:55 AM
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Aaaannd ... since the thoughts I'm having on these matters can be somewhat contradictory ("Naomi" doesn't admit of many nicknames), I think that providing two middle names might be a good idea. The kid can then choose as s/he grows up.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 10:59 AM
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"Naomi" doesn't admit of many nicknames

Mimi.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 11:01 AM
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Nao Zedong.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 11:04 AM
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Omi Wise


Posted by: Mo Macarbie | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 11:06 AM
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He was a good student and carried off his crazy name with aplomb. I don't know whether it was a Chinese or a Korean "Lee," but he was a native American-English speaker of Asian descent.


Posted by: redfoxtailshrub | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 11:06 AM
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My parents supposedly chose my name specifically because they figured it couldn't be shortened or made into a nickname, and this has taught me that people can abbreviate any name if they have a mind to. Naomi could be not only Mimi but Nome, Nay-Oh, or any other number of horrors.


Posted by: persistently visible | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 11:08 AM
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Nay-Nay is the one I'd expect.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 11:09 AM
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Don't worry about nicknames. The playground sorts itself. Anyone without an easily identifiable nickname will be called "stinky" or "curly" or "big red" or some other easily recognizable physical attribute.


Posted by: Tasseled Loafered Leech | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 11:11 AM
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Nay-oh. Me say Naaay-oh.
Nay might come, man,
Don't call her Nome.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 11:12 AM
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To W. Breeze's request, allow me to be the first to suggest "Sue".


Posted by: persistently visible | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 11:12 AM
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I still haven't quite gotten over laughing inwardly at the name of my daughters' classmate Meh. (Turns out it's an endearment, and her real Shoshone name is lovely but long and hard to remember.)


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 11:12 AM
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Indian friends of mine named their kid Aryan.

Some people I went to high school with named their first kid Arien, pronounced like aryan. Out of ignorance, rather than any white supremicist leanings. I'm told they've gotten hip to how it sounds, and now call her Ari, pronounced like Airy. Really, they've just dug themselves a hole with that name.


Posted by: Blume | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 11:12 AM
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"I Moan".


Posted by: Mr. Blandings | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 11:13 AM
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I wonder if you can protection your child from prison by calling him "Dismissed With Prejudice"?


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 11:14 AM
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named their kid Aryan


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 11:23 AM
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99: obligatory; related.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 11:24 AM
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93: That's only going to be the case when the child is growing up in a relatively non-transient environment. If you move around a lot, that kind of thing doesn't take hold.

91: this has taught me that people can abbreviate any name if they have a mind to. Naomi could be not only Mimi but Nome, Nay-Oh, or any other number of horrors.

Horrors is right. People tried -- in college -- to abbreviate my name, and after a couple of weeks, I was forced to say, "You know, I appreciate what you're doing, but this isn't working for me. If you want to keep at it, if it's sincere, okay, but um, it stops me short every time. But, uh, okay? 'cuz I love you too."


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 11:32 AM
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65: Khris. &c.

Spotted on FB recently: (girl) Kher/ngton Kar/y Common-Scots-lastname-that-begins-with-a-hard-C

Parents must be big "Dynasty" fans, I guess.


Posted by: Natilo Paennim | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 11:35 AM
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In college, people called me "Hammer." It was intended ironically as I was the small, bookish one in my peer group. All my later nicknames have paled in comparison.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 11:36 AM
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"Hammer Dick" is a pretty manly name.


Posted by: Robert Halford | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 11:40 AM
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I was a Rusty until college.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 11:41 AM
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104: Were you a Master of Ceremonies?


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 11:41 AM
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"Parsimon" is an anagram? Of course!

This means her last name consists of three consonants (Slavic?), but it all makes sense now.


Posted by: Cryptic ne | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 11:42 AM
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Growing up, my brothers called me heebie-geebie.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 11:42 AM
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Cryptic ne

A nickname?


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 11:42 AM
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106: Then you got some experience?

107: It started when I was in high school, before MC Hammer.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 11:42 AM
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We'll call him three-fifths.

Middle name "Compromise".


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 11:44 AM
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111.2: And then MC Hammer happened, but they kept on calling you that anyway, because they were 2 legit 2 quit?


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 11:45 AM
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112: You couldn't even read two comments further?


Posted by: oudemia | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 11:45 AM
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115

108: ? I have way too much of a cold to parse that.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 11:54 AM
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116

If you move around a lot, that kind of thing doesn't take hold.

Indulge me while I relate this anecdote.

While in college, the woman who became my first wife was goofing around with some friends and they decided to roll down a hill like one does when very young. She got only half way down the hill, and that particular bunch started calling her "half way" as a term of endearment. She was not amused.

Flash forward to a year abroad program, with none of the friends who used that nickname attending with her. At the orientation, she introduced herself to the group, using first and last name name. A co-participant from a college on the other side of the country pipes up "Not, 'half way last name'?" Shocked how her fame has spread, she admits that she is in fact, said person. The nickname sticks during her year abroad.

Fortunately for her, upon return to the home campus after the year abroad the nickname has been forgotten by those who remained, and life proceeded happily along.

No five dollars involved, not the equivalent in foreign currency, to the best of my knowledge.


Posted by: Tasseled Loafered Leech | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 11:57 AM
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117

"Parsimon" is an anagram?

No, acronym.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 11:57 AM
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118

||

In class, we're learning Tedious Integration Techniques. A student excitedly tells me about Cumbersome Mnemonic Device. I say that I'd never heard of it, and explain why it works. It annoys me slightly because it eliminates a step which is easy to understand and replaces it with memory, but whatever. The class all listens intently.

After class, the student and another are all "I can't believe YOU never heard of this! The teacher! You're supposed to be so good at math!"

I didn't explain that this crap is the opposite of being good at math. But they kept up the ribbing a little longer than I had patience for.

|>


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:05 PM
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119

116: That's horrible. I suspect that elementary school kids don't spread their recollections quite so widely, though. As it is, I'm consistently amazed by the reaching out that high schoolers do via Facebook. I approach it all with great caution.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:06 PM
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120

115: What ne is suggesting is that your name is Naomi Srp.


Posted by: Eggplant | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:07 PM
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121

Cumbersome Mnemonic Device

the only ones I can ever remember are HOMES and KISS


Posted by: Tasseled Loafered Leech | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:08 PM
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118: I remember somebody explaining a long, complicated way to list out the multiplication table for 9s. (This was in grade school.) It was much, much harder than memorizing the actual multiplication table and way too complex to be of any use.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:09 PM
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123

That's horrible.

It doesn't seem very horrible to me.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:11 PM
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124

120: Oh. Thanks.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:11 PM
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125

It wasn't really complex. Cumbersome is a better word for it.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:11 PM
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126

For a little while in college I had the nickname CUTI, which stood for Chronic Urinary Tract Infection.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:11 PM
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127

112: You couldn't even read two comments further?

APPARENTLY

No, acronym.

Positronic Artificial Replicant Skilled in Immediate Mathematics and Online Nullification


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:12 PM
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128

126: Thanks to HIPAA, nicknames like that should be harder to acquire.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:13 PM
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To tie two threads together, Positronic Artificial Replicant Skilled in Immediate Mathematics and Online Nullification's yearly mileage may make baby seals anticipate licentious balderdash.


Posted by: persistently visible | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:19 PM
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130

Artificial Replicant

I prefer my replicants organic.


Posted by: Rick Deckard | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:19 PM
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131

There's a mnemonic for the first 10 integer multiples of 9 that I've always found quite efficient and helpful. If it's the same one, obviously, Moby is a fool.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:20 PM
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132

131: The one where you write 0 to 9 down the page and then up the page again? That really annoys me.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:21 PM
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133

132: that's not how I think of it, but sure. For each multiple in turn you increment the tens place and decrement the ones place, until you get to twelve and everything, as in life, falls apart.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:27 PM
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134

I neglected to say earlier that Sally and Newt's dinner sounds fantastic! That particular aspect of parenting sounds incredibly rewarding.


Posted by: Thorn | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:27 PM
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135

127.last: Huh. I don't recognize myself in that, certainly.


Posted by: parsimon | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:28 PM
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the only ones I can ever remember are HOMES and KISS

What? No love for MRS. VAN DER TRAMP ?


Posted by: Knecht Ruprecht | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:29 PM
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137

I mean, it's useful if you're ten.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:30 PM
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138

For quite some time I thought it would be fun to name a kid Cromwell, but insist on calling him "L.P.", for Lord Protector. Sure, he'd hate you for it early on, but it would make a cute conversation-piece for his college/post-college years. It would kinda rule out spending significant time in Ireland, though.

Like CJB, I now think "Pain" would be great. BTW, any Bostonian folks want to meet up, uhh, today or tomorrow? I'm the master of advance planning.


Posted by: X. Trapnel | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:30 PM
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133: I'm not saying it doesn't work, but if you manage the "8 times" portion without a crutch, maybe you should just go ahead and do the 9s the same way.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:30 PM
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139: by using the "eight seven five six... eight times seven equals fifty six!" strategy?


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:35 PM
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141

maybe it was "five six seven eight". That would make more sense.

If I get out of this thread having forgotten how to count I'll be pretty sad.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:37 PM
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136. Heh. I should have said I only use those two. I remember a bunch, like MOOSEMUSS and the 4 Bs, OODA, etc but they have limited application outside of the military.


Posted by: Tasseled Loafered Leech | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:38 PM
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143

"five six seven eight"

Schlemiel! Schlimazel! Hasenpfeffer Incorporated!


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:41 PM
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144

Five times six equals seventy-eight.


Posted by: Unopionated Grandma | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:42 PM
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145

OODA, etc but they have limited application outside of the military.

You'd be surprised.


Posted by: Knecht Ruprecht | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:42 PM
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146

5 x 6 = 78. Got it.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:43 PM
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147

Too slow. Shit.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:43 PM
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148

Useful children are indeed great. Mine may have to get jobs when their Child Benefit gets taken away, so that really will be useful.

Miles is a lovely name.


Posted by: asilon | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:49 PM
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149

I remember a math test in second grade, where we were asked to multiply (or add? I guess probably add) two two-digit numbers. I decided that there had to be a simple trick to adding these two numbers that they weren't telling us. Aha! I realized: if you took the upper right number (the two numbers to be added were stacked vertically) and then the lower left number, and arranged them in that order, you would have the answer! I did not do very well on that test.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:56 PM
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126: Relevant. Their ads always crack me up because they are totally unabashed about using their acronym.

I love that "experience UTI" is one of the banner menu items.


Posted by: F | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 12:57 PM
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151

FUBAR seems the more frequent condition.


Posted by: CharleyCarp | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 1:06 PM
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152

SNAFU, too.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 1:09 PM
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153

FUBAR and SNAFU are certainly useful descriptions, but not exactly helpful for remembering needed information, so Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally.


Posted by: Tasseled Loafered Leech | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 1:14 PM
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149: In 3d grade I decided long division was stupid.* So on tests, if, say, the problem was 153 divided by 9, I would make 153 little hashmarks on my test paper and then circle groups of 9. I didn't do very well on that test, either, because I only go to, like, the first two problems.

*First (? surely not?) in a long line of self-destructive decisions on things I decided I didn't need to know in school.


Posted by: oudemia | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 1:17 PM
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I'm kind of happy to hear stories like 149 and 154 because the kids I'm tutoring almost without exception never memorized multiplication tables or anything like that and one of our goals for the year is to make them do so. The younger ones (second and third grade) and several of the olders (up through high school) do all adding and subtracting either counting on their fingers or using hashmarks. Add in that the third grader I was working with last week has a tendency to assume that "thirty-seven" should start with a seven when she's looking for it on her number grid and I've been a little worried about how to get them to competency.


Posted by: Thorn | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 1:22 PM
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156

For a significant portion of my childhood, I directionless, until I learned the important rule: Never Eat Slimy Worms.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 1:22 PM
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157

How to you get rid of the slime?


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 1:25 PM
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158

Stanley learn grammar from Tonto?


Posted by: CharleyCarp | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 1:25 PM
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159

Oh, whoops.


Posted by: Stanley | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 1:26 PM
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160

(Or, for the humorless, from the screenwriters' casual racism?)


Posted by: CharleyCarp | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 1:26 PM
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160: Tragedy me speak ungrammatical, paleface. Comedy you fall in canyon and die.


Posted by: OPINIONATED TONTO | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 1:31 PM
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Now Tonto is opinionated, but back when he was on TV he barely opened his mouth. Stupid poor role model.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 1:38 PM
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There's good and evil in everyone. Bye, y'all.


Posted by: CharleyCarp | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 1:41 PM
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Kaw-liga was similarly reticent.


Posted by: lw | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 1:58 PM
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20: I have a friend named Bo (1/2 Southern U.S.ian 1/2 Nigerian) His real name is Olu/mi/de Ade/bo. When he arrived at the University of Minnesota from Nigeria, the roommates or teammates felt that that was too complicated, so they started calling him Bo and teasing him about being Bo Jangles.


Posted by: Bostoniangirl | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 2:00 PM
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My kids aren't competent at full dinners yet, but Maura (who is more interested in creating recipes than in following them) made some cookies that were edible and reasonably cookie-like. I didn't help much, apart from dissuading her from using a tablespoon of nutmeg.

but if you manage the "8 times" portion without a crutch

The best way to learn the eight times table is from Blossom Dearie.


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 2:03 PM
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dissuading her from using a tablespoon of nutmeg.
Yeah, it takes a lot more than that to feel any effects.


Posted by: Eggplant | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 2:09 PM
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I didn't help much, apart from dissuading her from using a tablespoon of nutmeg.

They really should sell that stuff in a much smaller container.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 2:10 PM
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I have to quit goofing off now. I'm able to get away with it for a bit, because I was at a doctor's appointment and have to wait around the hospital for another one.

However, we are doing this stupid time study where we have to keep track of all of our -day in 15 minute increments (we're not paid like lawyers). This can go under personal time.

It sucks so bad. We have to categorize not by client bu by type of work --rehabilitative-direct, indirect rehabilitative (paperwork) and other.


Posted by: Bostoniangirl | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 2:19 PM
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That sounds horrible, BG.


Posted by: Eggplant | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 2:26 PM
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Elizapedia.


Posted by: Alex | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 4:46 PM
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There's really nothing as good as watching your kids be competent.

IMX that pleasure doesn't fade forty-something years later.


Posted by: Biohazard | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 5:17 PM
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It is, and I'm sure that there will be some fudging. My boss, specifically, and the organization generally, does not micromanage in this way.

The problem is that a lot of what we do is paid for my medicaid. (That money doesn't go straight to us but to the state, so the Department of Mental Health is breathing down us to get more billable events.) For every day that we do something rehabilitative, we can put down an R day, but you could spend 5 minutes talking to someone about their diet strategy, take them to an appointment where you talk to the doctor about modifying the glucophage dosing so that the client doesn't have to go back to the group home at 4 and can go to social events. And then talk about their feelings about the illness. If you don't talk about the diet but do everything else, you can't call it an R day, but if you only spend 5 minutes on the R piece, you can claim the whole day--though you can't get one R for me and one R for House staff.

The people I work with don't goof off, but it could easily happen, so they want to crack down to make sure that they're squeezing as much rehabilitation out of us. Of course, that piece doesn't really work until you've built a relationship and the person trusts you.

And in the context of a community-based system where you might go out with someone, stop by the store and then have a conversation about healthy eating, it's hard to tease apart.


Posted by: Bostoniangirl | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 7:03 PM
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Colton's real name is basically the equivalent to heebie choosing Jammbie for her kid, smushing together parts of both parents' names. It certainly can lead to unique outcomes, which I suppose is part of the point.

I once met a C/lini/que, so named for her parents, Clinton and Monique. I don't think they knew of the cosmetics company when they made the decision.

and teasing him about being Bo Jangles

Um, wow. That's disgusting. (No offense to Mr. Robinson.)


Posted by: Witt | Link to this comment | 10- 4-10 8:13 PM
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I once met a C/lini/que, so named for her parents, Clinton and Monique

Works even less well if your parents are called Arnold and Soledad.


Posted by: ajay | Link to this comment | 10- 5-10 2:57 AM
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174: I think it was also that they found his name too long to pronounce. Anyway, he still goes by "Bo."


Posted by: Bostoniangirl | Link to this comment | 10- 5-10 4:41 AM
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In my experience parents who name multiple kids variations on the parents' names are megalomaniacs. By which I mean millionaires and/or local politicians.


Posted by: Cryptic ned | Link to this comment | 10- 5-10 7:42 AM
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177: or they might be Johann Sebastian Bach.


Posted by: ajay | Link to this comment | 10- 5-10 7:54 AM
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If you were lead singer for "Skid Row," you might get a big ego. Don't judge.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10- 5-10 8:09 AM
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