Re: Meteor

1

I've never understood the logic of the phrase "meteoric rise". There's one thing meteors do, and rising ain't it.


Posted by: MAE | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 8:52 AM
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2

First Tunguska and now this. I think the aliens from Alpha Centauri must have it in for the Russians for some reason.


Posted by: AcademicLurker | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 8:56 AM
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3

It's good those dash cams were finally able to capture something hurtling towards them besides other Russians.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 8:58 AM
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4

The crater is impressive, though not as impressive as Labs's colon.


Posted by: Von Wafer | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 9:19 AM
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5

I've posted a map centered on the West/boro nuts, maybe the aliens will improve their aim and leave the rural Russians alone.


Posted by: Biohazard | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 9:19 AM
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6

That is apparently not the crater.


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 9:24 AM
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7

Is it Labs' colon?


Posted by: MAE | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 9:25 AM
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8

Genau.


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 9:28 AM
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9

Have we moved this conversation over here now? The Guardian live blog has some fairly impressive pics and video.


Posted by: chris y | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 9:40 AM
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10

I suppose it was already the consensus that Tunguska was something like this, but it makes a lot more intuitive sense to me now - this impact shattered windows and blew open doors, whereas Tunguska was bigger and knocked over trees.


Posted by: Minivet | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 9:58 AM
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11

Estimate is 2 meters? Come on, isn't there some interplanetary object scale, like how all tumors are measured relative to various fruits and hail is measured relative to sports balls? The meteor was the size of a grand piano.


Posted by: SP | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 10:03 AM
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12

15 meters is what I'm seeing - 40 tonnes.


Posted by: chris y | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 10:25 AM
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13

15 metres sounds awfully big for 40 tonnes, when you consider that these things are seriously iron rich. Also, Russia is claiming "only" 10 tonnes


Posted by: Ginger Yellow | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 10:36 AM
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14

But black oil is less dense than iron.


Posted by: Eggplant | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 10:40 AM
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15

No way 15 meters for 40 tonnes. That's a density of 0.64 g/cc which means it would float. Average density of meteorites is 2.5-3.5 g/cc which, if the 40 tonnes is correct, implies 3-4 meters (assuming a sphere.)


Posted by: SP | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 10:44 AM
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16

Sorry, I should have said implies medium sized pipe organ.


Posted by: SP | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 10:45 AM
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17

Assuming a spherical pipe organ.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 10:46 AM
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18

Assuming a floating meteor.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 10:48 AM
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19

I guess the musical instrument scale breaks down at extinction level events. BUT THEN IT WON'T MATTER ANYWAY!


Posted by: SP | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 10:48 AM
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20

I guess the musical instrument scale breaks down at extinction level events.

Maybe not.


Posted by: MAE | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 10:56 AM
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21

19: WURLITZMAGEDDON


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 10:57 AM
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22

I guess the musical instrument scale breaks down at extinction level events

An asteroid the size of the Great Stalacpipe Organ could do some damage.


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 11:00 AM
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23

Fuck.


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 11:01 AM
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24

21 is the best thing I've seen on the Internet today.


Posted by: Sir Kraab | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 11:01 AM
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25

15: Many asteroids are loosely consolidated piles of regolith, so it's possible to have a really low density. I don't know if that's what's going on here or if someone is just pulling numbers out of their ass, but there it is.


Posted by: togolosh | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 11:14 AM
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26

12: 15 meters

I wonder if that was the crater (or 'a" crater). The "big" ear miss one is only estimated at 50 meters diameter.


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 11:14 AM
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27

ear s/b near


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 11:15 AM
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28

A meteor the size of an elephant ear would do some damage. That's a big ear.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 11:16 AM
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29

Obviously the Stalacpipe Organ killed the dinosaurs, but was Tunguska a Melbourne Theremin or a Madison Loudspeaker?


Posted by: snarkout | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 12:00 PM
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30

NASA currently estimates it was 15 meters prior to entering the atmosphere.


Posted by: MAE | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 12:24 PM
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31

30: Wow. Bigger than my house. Like, 8X.


Posted by: JRoth | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 12:53 PM
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32

31: Your house is less than two meters across? This Not So Big thing has gotten entirely out of hand.


Posted by: togolosh | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 1:01 PM
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33

JRoth's real name is Jakub Szczesny.


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 1:11 PM
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34

Volume, togs.


Posted by: JRoth | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 1:17 PM
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35

Some of the jokes going around the Russian internet. I like the "meteorite's inhabitants" one.


Posted by: Minivet | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 2:40 PM
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36

7,000 tons for 15 metres.


Posted by: Ginger Yellow | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 2:53 PM
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37

I can't get the image of a clown playing calliope and hurtling towards earth becoming a giant exploding ball of fire out of my head now.


Posted by: Mentioner | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 3:50 PM
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38

DC hockey blog Russian Machine Never Breaks was one of the first American sites to report on this, according to Ms Franke-Ruta .


Posted by: bill | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 4:00 PM
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39

37: why would anyone try?


Posted by: text | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 6:32 PM
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40

Sorry, pause and play.


Posted by: text | Link to this comment | 02-15-13 6:34 PM
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41

This is more to the other dead thread, but I checked out some library books on mass extinctions and I'm working my way through them and this stuff is really fascinating. There's a book edited by William Glen in 1994 called The Mass-Extinction Debates: How Science Works in a Crisis, a lot of which is written from a sociological/historical perspective about how scientists react to new information and perceived incursions from people outside their field, which is also really interesting, even apart from the intrinsic interest of the science itself.


Posted by: essear | Link to this comment | 02-16-13 2:41 PM
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