Re: Who Says Americans Don't Understand Irony?

1

Did the guy wander into a Billy Bragg concert without knowing the politics or did he pay money just to get to shout that?


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10- 6-13 8:55 PM
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2

I mean, I had to google Mr. Bragg, but my dad was only a non-combat veteran so I may have not been told everything.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10- 6-13 9:08 PM
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3

He defended Guam, but apparently Guam was mostly safe by 1951.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10- 6-13 9:10 PM
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4

It is kind of ironic that, decades after standing up to Hitler, the British have such limited rights of free speech, with their McLibel trials and super injunctions and stuff.


Posted by: Natilo Paennim | Link to this comment | 10- 6-13 10:01 PM
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5

We don't all know very much about British freedom of speech, or irony.


Posted by: text | Link to this comment | 10- 6-13 10:06 PM
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6

All British know very much about freedom, or irony of speech, don't we?


Posted by: Natilo Paennim | Link to this comment | 10- 6-13 11:16 PM
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7

six very much embodies irony of some form.


Posted by: text | Link to this comment | 10- 6-13 11:28 PM
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8

Scrambled, I think.


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 10- 6-13 11:50 PM
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9

I saw a guy at a Fugazi show with a tshirt that said "Keep YOUR politics out of MY music." I am thinking it had to be a joke. (And I think the heckler was being funny too.)


Posted by: oudemia | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 5:44 AM
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10

Politicians do stupid stuff like that all the time- Reagan with Born in the USA, many politicians with an "unbiased" song like This Land is Your Land.


Posted by: SP | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 6:11 AM
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11

Or when Clinton thought that Fleetwood Mac would somehow help attract voters.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 6:14 AM
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12

I earwormed myself on that, but I'm going to blame SP.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 6:15 AM
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13

I earwormed myself

You should probably go to the bathroom to do that. Or Nantucket.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 6:17 AM
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14

Limericks don't count as songs.


Posted by: SP | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 6:24 AM
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15

Although Billy Joel once pointed out that Piano Man is just a bunch of limerick verses.


Posted by: SP | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 6:25 AM
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16

"And the waitress is practicing politics,
as the businessmen slowly get stoned.
They're sharing a drink they call Loneliness,
because they suck at nicknaming."


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 6:30 AM
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17

They're sharing a drink they call Loneliness,
And arguing homed versus honed.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 6:52 AM
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18

Well, we're all in the mood for a melody
But we've got another thing coming.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 6:53 AM
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19

Mash-up time.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 6:57 AM
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20

17,18: My cow-orker loves the phrase "six dozen or the other." I know what he means, but how the hell do you get to that?


Posted by: togolosh | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 7:12 AM
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21

18, 19 -- I had a vision of Judas Priest storming onto stage and smashing Billy Joel's piano, and then realized that in this fantasy world I am pretending to be in Judas Priest, and now I'm confused and feel disoriented but still want to smash Billy Joel's piano.


Posted by: Robert Halford | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 7:28 AM
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22

20: I've heard "Six of one and a dozen of the other" and I love it. If only all decisions were that easy.


Posted by: LizardBreath | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 8:39 AM
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23

22. IME it means, "nothing to choose between them", so it may make for a difficult decision if you have to pick one and dump the other.


Posted by: chris y | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 8:42 AM
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24

The standard form, "six of one and a half dozen of the other" would be a hard choice to make. The garbled version in 22 is pretty easy.


Posted by: LizardBreath | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 8:43 AM
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25

"Sixty-one and a half dozen of the otter" is what I've always heard.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 8:46 AM
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26

Mr. Robot (Mr. Roboto?) is in Allentown today for work, and I blame him (and Billy Joel) for my current earworm.


Posted by: J, Robot | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 8:48 AM
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27

I frequently misremembered it as "six and a half of one, a dozen of the other." I figured this applied to things with an exchange rate of 13:24.


Posted by: Benquo | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 9:08 AM
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28

Basically I figured it was some archaic reference that used to make sense, like "dollars to doughnuts."


Posted by: Benquo | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 9:09 AM
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29

I've found it amusing for a while that "dollars to doughnuts" now describes pretty even odds.


Posted by: LizardBreath | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 9:19 AM
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30

The donut stand at the farmer's market charges three bucks per.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 9:21 AM
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31

This thread made me laugh surprisingly hard. Like, tears. Not that you guys aren't funny, but I'm also really tired at the moment.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 9:35 AM
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32

Which is to say that I needed that.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 9:35 AM
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33

The donut stand at the farmer's market charges three bucks per.

Well that's what you have to pay to get them fresh picked from the donut trees.


Posted by: Ginger Yellow | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 9:44 AM
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34

29: We need a new phrase that reflects the reality of inflation.

Jacksons to jellies?
Grants to granola bars?
Franklins to fritters?


Posted by: Benquo | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 10:26 AM
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35

Sawbucks to sawdust?


Posted by: LizardBreath | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 10:28 AM
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36

C-notes to cenotes? (work with me here -- a hole in the ground can't be worth much, right?)


Posted by: LizardBreath | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 10:29 AM
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37

Millions to molehills?


Posted by: Benquo | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 10:31 AM
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38

Grands to Galettes


Posted by: Benquo | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 10:32 AM
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39

The problem with "Grands" is that I don't think it's ever pluralized in use -- it's the number, not a name for the bill. That is, "five hundred", in context, means $500, and "five hundreds" means five green rectangular pieces of paper with Franklin's face on them that are collectively worth $500. But no one ever says "two grands" to refer to two rectangles of paper with Grover Cleveland on them.


Posted by: LizardBreath | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 10:36 AM
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40

39: Gs, then. Gs to Galettes.


Posted by: Benquo | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 10:39 AM
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41

Clevelands to Cronuts


Posted by: Benquo | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 10:39 AM
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42

Hundreds to hashbrowns?


Posted by: LizardBreath | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 10:41 AM
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43

Wilsons to Walnuts


Posted by: Benquo | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 10:41 AM
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44

Horseshoes to handgrenades?


Posted by: LizardBreath | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 10:42 AM
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45

Benjamins to bent jam tins.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 10:45 AM
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46

no one ever says "two grands" to refer to two rectangles of paper with Grover Cleveland on them.

Two non-consecutive pieces of paper, that is.


Posted by: ajay | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 10:47 AM
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47

"New and different": would you describe "and different" as redundant, not quite redundant, or adding substantially significant information to the word "new"?

Once I get into this loop I just can't get out.


Posted by: lurid keyaki | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 10:47 AM
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48

Euros to euros.


Posted by: ajay | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 10:48 AM
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49

"New and different":
would you describe
"and different"
as
New,
Different,
New and different,
or None -
New and different,
Different,
New,
as
different
describe:
Different and New.


Posted by: Awl | Link to this comment | 10- 7-13 5:06 PM
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50

44: Horseshoes to handgrenades to atomic* bombs as we neighborhood wits would have it back in the day.

Or as Ron Burgundy would say, "Boy, that escalated quickly... I mean, that really got out of hand fast."

*Why we didn't go continue the alliteration with "hydrogen bombs" I don't know, but we didn't.


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 10- 8-13 2:47 AM
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