Re: Equal Time

1

Should there be a link somewhere in there?


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 12:32 PM
horizontal rule
2

Maybe it's ogged's new app?


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 12:42 PM
horizontal rule
3

Inside a subway it's too loud to scream.


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 12:44 PM
horizontal rule
4

Maybe, but what is it? It informs you about how loud the average subway is? It generates subway-like sounds for commuters on vacation who find it comforting? It lets you know what familiar-ish phenomenon the sound around you most resembles?


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 12:45 PM
horizontal rule
5

What's the difference between "max" and "peak"?


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 12:45 PM
horizontal rule
6

I liked Avg Subway before they were cool.


Posted by: dalriata | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 12:45 PM
horizontal rule
7

4 is great.


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 12:46 PM
horizontal rule
8

My guess is that it measures sounds and displays what it iss "equivalent" to--lawnmower, plane, subway, etc.


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 12:48 PM
horizontal rule
9

8: So 4.last, but probably only decibel level, not any other characteristics of the sound.


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 12:50 PM
horizontal rule
10

I assume this is a screenshot of some sound monitoring app that lets you know how loudly your kid is screaming. Perhaps the subway thing is just a comparison?


Posted by: togolosh | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 12:50 PM
horizontal rule
11

Awesome swimming app. Subway obviously the time you spend underwater. dB is deep breaths in hipster calligraphy. Max and Peak are your blood oxygen and/or pulse readings or other acquatic-type fit-bit kind of things.


Posted by: bill | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 12:52 PM
horizontal rule
12

I figured "Max" and "Peak" were people's names.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 12:54 PM
horizontal rule
13

Something something five-dollar footlong something.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 12:56 PM
horizontal rule
14

a screenshot of some sound monitoring app that lets you know how loudly your kid is screaming. Perhaps the subway thing is just a comparison?

Correct! I used to blog here when nosflow was smart. The difference between max and peak is technical and you should feel free to google it.


Posted by: ogged | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 1:05 PM
horizontal rule
15

when nosflow was smart.

Man, I remember that. What happened?


Posted by: nosflow | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 1:08 PM
horizontal rule
16

The maximum and minimum sound levels are simply the highest and lowest time-weighted sound level measured. Be careful with the Peak, as the terms "Peak" and "Maximum" mean very different things in the world of sound level meters.
The Peak is not the same as the Maximum Sound Level. The Peak, referred to as the Lpeak or sometimes Lpk, is the maximum value reached by the sound pressure. There is no time-constant applied and the signal has not passed through an RMS circuit or calculator. This is the true Peak of the sound pressure wave.
For a pure tone, the Peak will be 3 dB above the Maximum Sound Level. For varying signals there can be a huge difference and there is no way to calculate the Peak from the Max or any other measurement.


Posted by: SP | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 1:08 PM
horizontal rule
17

15: Welcome to your 30s! It's all downhill from here.


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 1:12 PM
horizontal rule
18

You might want to turn the baby down a little. That's pretty loud.


Posted by: ydnew | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 1:14 PM
horizontal rule
19

It really, truly is. And not in that good whee downhill is fast way.


Posted by: ogged | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 1:15 PM
horizontal rule
20

That's pretty loud.

Yes, it's really fucking loud. He's chilled (a little) but I used to wear earplugs to change his diaper. No shit fooling.


Posted by: ogged | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 1:16 PM
horizontal rule
21

After a relatively brief bout with cholicy symptoms, our daughter (17 mo)has actually become remarkably un-loud and un-crying most of the time.

We have decided that this is because we are amazing parents. This has the benefit of making us feel superior, though the best thing about it is that it helps us avoid the feeling that our next one will be a crying, screaming nightmare. (Though, of course, we will love her no less for it, except to the extent that exhaustion dims everything.)


Posted by: Trumwill | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 1:33 PM
horizontal rule
22

20: Have you considered him telling to try to be a little quieter? I know you modern parents hate to discourage creativity of any sort, but well I thought I'd just offer an old person's perspective.


Posted by: peep | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 1:46 PM
horizontal rule
23

18 made me laugh.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 2:07 PM
horizontal rule
24

Babies only cry loudly because they aren't being nurtured enough. Have you tried wearing your baby? A baby with sufficient attention shouldn't be crying this loudly, and you should be concerned that the baby is making this much noise.


Posted by: Robert Halford | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 2:27 PM
horizontal rule
25

In the Masai culture in Africa, where mothers wear their babies in slings and keep them close at all times, crying this loudly is unknown.


Posted by: Robert Halford | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 2:28 PM
horizontal rule
26

24 & 25 feel wasted w/o the video feed of the parent's head exploding on receipt of these helpful hints.


Posted by: dairy queen | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 2:31 PM
horizontal rule
27

If a baby cries, alone in a forest, does it make a sound?


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 2:33 PM
horizontal rule
28

Although I did once recommend a waterproof, mesh sling meant for poolwear as a gift to a swim-loving parent and the gift was reportedly well-loved.


Posted by: dairy queen | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 2:33 PM
horizontal rule
29

27: I don't know. I couldn't get IRB approval.


Posted by: JRoth | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 2:40 PM
horizontal rule
30

28: I hope there were warnings about recommended stroke/sling position combinations.


Posted by: JRoth | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 2:40 PM
horizontal rule
31

24,25: Honestly the half-assed totally racist fake ethnographic studies are the best part of baby books. Noble savage women don't feel labor pain, you know!

The Calabat is not as loud but he seems to scream himself into hysterics very easily.


Posted by: Cala | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 2:41 PM
horizontal rule
32

Common sense I think will easily lead any parent to adopt the most soothing stroke/position. Or at least the with the best sound muffling effects ...


Posted by: dairy queen | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 2:43 PM
horizontal rule
33

A baby's cry is a signal designed for the survival of the baby and the development of the parents. Responding sensitively to your baby's cries builds trust. Babies trust that their caregivers will be responsive to their needs. Parents gradually learn to trust in their ability to appropriately meet their baby's needs. This raises the parent-child communication level up a notch. Tiny babies cry to communicate, not to manipulate.


Posted by: Robert Halford | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 2:43 PM
horizontal rule
34

Since the cry is a baby's language, a communication tool, a baby has two choices if no one listens. Either he can cry louder, harder, and produce a more disturbing signal or he can clam up and become a "good baby" (meaning "quiet"). If no one listens, he will become a very discouraged baby. He'll learn the one thing you don't want him to: that he can't communicate.

Baby loses trust in the signal value of his cry - and perhaps baby also loses trust in the responsiveness of his caregivers. Not only does something vital go "out" of baby, an important ingredient in the parent- child relationship goes "out" of parents: sensitivity. When you respond intuitively to your infant's needs, as you practice this cue- response listening skill hundreds of times in the early months, baby learns to cue better (the cries take on a less disturbing and more communicative quality as baby learns to "talk better") . . . In time you learn the ultimate in crying sensitivity: to read baby's body language and respond to her pre-cry signals so baby doesn't always have to cry to communicate her needs.


Posted by: Robert Halford | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 2:47 PM
horizontal rule
35

Children torment their siblings to communicate. You and your spouse should hold self-criticism sessions to best assess which partner is failing the children so appropriate adjustments can be made.


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 2:50 PM
horizontal rule
36

The Calabat is not as loud but he seems to scream himself into hysterics very easily.

Screaming into hysterics is amateur. Screaming into throwing up is pro.


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 2:52 PM
horizontal rule
37

Babies modulate their screams to the exact frequencies that shreds their mothers' nerves.


Posted by: Cala | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 2:52 PM
horizontal rule
38

33, 34: Are you quoting, or making that up on the fly? Because if that's you, you're disturbingly good at it.


Posted by: LizardBreath | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 2:52 PM
horizontal rule
39

38: think about what he does both professionally and recreationally. It's about what I would expect.


Posted by: Josh | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 2:54 PM
horizontal rule
40

38: Yes, 34 came in as I was writing 35 and now I feel shame.


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 2:55 PM
horizontal rule
41

Babies modulate their screams to the exact frequencies that shreds their mothers' nerves.

My kids can hit a note that makes my eardrum pulse in this slow wwwhhhhahn, wwwwwhhhahn, wwwwhhhhahn throb. Actually, now that I think about it, I haven't heard Ace do that. Must be that my eardrums are too old now.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 2:56 PM
horizontal rule
42

No, I'm quoting. Those are direct quotes from the Dr. Sears (America's #1 pediatrician) website.


Posted by: Robert Halford | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 2:57 PM
horizontal rule
43

38: Looks lie stealing quoting at least in part.


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 2:57 PM
horizontal rule
44

"One Dr. Sears, one bullet" is a R. Halford original quote, though.


Posted by: Robert Halford | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 2:58 PM
horizontal rule
45

+k


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 2:58 PM
horizontal rule
46

I'm not sure that "1 Dr. Sears, 1K bullets" has the same ring to it.


Posted by: NickS | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 3:00 PM
horizontal rule
47

41: S had this amazing vocal apparatus when she was an infant that would occasionally create purity of scream such that it genuinely felt as though it penetrated to the center of my brain. Traces of it remain there still.


Posted by: Jesus McQueen | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 3:00 PM
horizontal rule
48

I was going to quote back from Napalmolive -- sometimes I think my kids are doing it on purpose -- but then it turned serious. And I got lost listening to a clip from the Giant Rat of Sumatra. And Beat the Reaper, for the other thread.


Posted by: CharleyCarp | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 3:01 PM
horizontal rule
49

When a boy's voice box goes through a growth spurt you can be deafened at the breakfast table and it seems it is only partially intentional.


Posted by: dairy queen | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 3:01 PM
horizontal rule
50

At least that's his story.


Posted by: dairy queen | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 3:04 PM
horizontal rule
51

The title doesn't quite work, but Eats, Poops & Leaves might be promising.


Posted by: JP Stormcrow | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 3:07 PM
horizontal rule
52

l'il PGD quickly learned a high keening exasperated wail of 'Daaaady!' 'Mommmmy!' got results. He totally mastered guilt-inducing inflections very early on.


Posted by: PGD | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 3:08 PM
horizontal rule
53

As the uncle of 13 before having my own kids, I had plenty of experience being appalled at crying babies. What I didn't expect was that as a parent, I'd develop a knack for ignoring it.

What I really didn't expect was that sometimes I'd find it cute.


Posted by: politicalfootball | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 5:15 PM
horizontal rule
54

The most beautiful sound in the world is somebody else's baby crying.


Posted by: JRoth | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 9:20 PM
horizontal rule
55

The most beautiful sound in the world is somebody else's baby crying.


Posted by: JRoth | Link to this comment | 03-24-14 9:20 PM
horizontal rule
56

This is timely. UNG just had another baby and I am having another mini-meltdown over the knowledge that I don't get to ever have any more babies.


Posted by: Di Kotimy | Link to this comment | 03-25-14 3:28 AM
horizontal rule
57

I'm sure this one will wind up in prison or something.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 03-25-14 4:10 AM
horizontal rule
58

Maybe even reality tv.


Posted by: Moby Hick | Link to this comment | 03-25-14 4:16 AM
horizontal rule
59

xelA isn't a baby who is particularly prone to crying -- mostly only when ill, or when I'm trying to put him to bed and I'm sick [little fucker knows, somehow] -- but he is _really_ loud and has quite a deep penetrating cry. He can also go for as long as it takes. All those sleep-training guides are totally full of shit.

'The first night is the worst. After 20 minutes they'll cry themselves to sleep.'

Aye, fuckin' right.


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 03-25-14 4:17 AM
horizontal rule
60

31: you mean you don't believe they all have their own special songs?


Posted by: ajay | Link to this comment | 03-25-14 4:36 AM
horizontal rule
61

The most beautiful sound in the world is somebody else's baby crying.

So very true.


Posted by: heebie-geebie | Link to this comment | 03-25-14 4:42 AM
horizontal rule
62

57: Thanks, Mobes. That means a lot.


Posted by: Di Kotimy | Link to this comment | 03-25-14 5:35 AM
horizontal rule
63

59: Yeah, Iris was terrible at the sleep training thing, too.

Most negligent parenting moment (so far): We had a homemade crib with gates that swung open and multiple latches to hold them shut. One night we're eating dinner and Iris is just crying and crying upstairs. We were trying to sleep-train her, so we held out a long time. Finally we go up, and the gate has come partly open, and she's fallen down, but with her head caught in the partial opening. OMFG. But she went to sleep pretty quickly after that, so that was good.


Posted by: JRoth | Link to this comment | 03-25-14 7:20 AM
horizontal rule
64

I am having another mini-meltdown over the knowledge that I don't get to ever have any more babies.

Trust me, it pales next to the near-constant meltdown driven by the realization that "Oh fuck, I'm almost 40 and just had another baby and I'm already too tired to get the dishes done every night."


Posted by: apostropher | Link to this comment | 03-25-14 7:43 AM
horizontal rule
65

Di, the girls were just whining that it's soooooo unfair that they got to go to Chicago for fall break and don't for spring break. Shall I ship them to you? The baby would be a bonus!


Posted by: Thorn | Link to this comment | 03-25-14 7:48 AM
horizontal rule
66

re: 63

We [by which I mean *I*] had to crash sleep-train him when my wife went back to work, as we switched from her putting him to bed every night [and feeding him before sleep] to me doing it 5 nights a week, with none of the requisite equipment to soothe him to sleep with a feed.

That went surprisingly OK, and now he only has terrible melt-downs at bed-time maybe one day out of seven. But he still wakes up in the night at least once, and I am completely incapable of settling him at night. He just won't accept it from me. So there are a lot of tears at 3am.

I think my wife is going to be in for a terrible shock when she completely stops breast-feeding and has to get him to sleep for the first time.


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 03-25-14 8:05 AM
horizontal rule
67

The most beautiful sound in the world is somebody else's baby crying.

Drawing on my experience on an American Airlines redeye a few years back, I would like to disagree with this 100%. Though I can see the point; rather like the comforting sound of battering rain and howling wind that you don't have to go out into.


Posted by: ajay | Link to this comment | 03-25-14 8:15 AM
horizontal rule
68

homemade crib

This has decapitation written all over it.


Posted by: ogged | Link to this comment | 03-25-14 11:07 AM
horizontal rule
69

68: oh, that's a fun way to decorate it.


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 03-25-14 11:10 AM
horizontal rule
70

I lost a sister to a poorly put together crib. That was a very close call.


Posted by: Noumenon72 | Link to this comment | 03-25-14 4:58 PM
horizontal rule
71

The most beautiful sound in the world is somebody else's baby crying.

Only if you also have a baby and it isn't. I remember before I had kids I felt utterly intolerant of people who couldn't shut up their crying babies, then when my kids were young I was pretty tolerant, and now that my kids are adults I'm pretty intolerant again.

Modest Proposal: Nobel Peace Prize for the inventor of noise-cancelling headphones. Who was it?


Posted by: | Link to this comment | 03-26-14 11:11 AM
horizontal rule