Re: Water-Upon-Ground

1

I heard that and was wondering about asilon and the other UK peeps.


Posted by: will | Link to this comment | 07-23-07 8:26 PM
horizontal rule
2

Yet another swimming post!


Posted by: md 20/400 | Link to this comment | 07-23-07 8:30 PM
horizontal rule
3

md 20/400!

I always think, "yea! 20 bottles of md 20/20!!"


Posted by: will | Link to this comment | 07-23-07 8:33 PM
horizontal rule
4

Almost 350,000 homes are without running water

Oh boy. And this is not in big cities, either. That's a big area.

Any destruction of 600-year-old academic buildings?


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 07-23-07 8:41 PM
horizontal rule
5

And you better fucking comment while swimming! Waterproof laptops.


Posted by: Cala | Link to this comment | 07-23-07 8:46 PM
horizontal rule
6

If cerebrocrat were there he would be blogging it.


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 07-23-07 8:50 PM
horizontal rule
7

Chris Brooke in Oxford has photos


Posted by: Gonerill | Link to this comment | 07-23-07 8:58 PM
horizontal rule
8

Yow. NattarGcM around?


Posted by: LizardBreath | Link to this comment | 07-23-07 9:00 PM
horizontal rule
9

Or perhaps afloat?


Posted by: DaveL | Link to this comment | 07-23-07 9:03 PM
horizontal rule
10

My sister and my mother are stuck on a hill in Worcestershire. The centre of the neighbouring town of Evesham is flooded and the main road out of her village has fallen in the water. But they have water, electricity, and food -- for a month, she says -- after making it to a supermarket on high ground. Blitz spirit!

But almost all the flooding is in the West, and I think that all the commentators here live in Oxford or further east. There is a wonderful Google maps mashup showing what happens to East Anglia if the sea rises a little -- the new coastline runs through the northern suburbs of Cambridge. But that hasn't happened yet.


Posted by: Nworb Werdna | Link to this comment | 07-23-07 11:18 PM
horizontal rule
11

NattarGcM's Facebook status is "awaiting the deluge."


Posted by: teofilo | Link to this comment | 07-23-07 11:40 PM
horizontal rule
12

Almost 350,000 homes are without running water

It's the UK. They're used to that.


Posted by: bitchphd | Link to this comment | 07-23-07 11:47 PM
horizontal rule
13

B, we find it hard to adjust to life without the water for cold showers. The rain's too warm in sumer to build character.


Posted by: Nworb Werdna | Link to this comment | 07-24-07 12:39 AM
horizontal rule
14

(in in summer, in Britain). In Sumer the rain is too warm all year round.


Posted by: Nworb Werdna | Link to this comment | 07-24-07 12:40 AM
horizontal rule
15

Personally, I'm fine. The main road out of my village (on the southern edge of Oxford city) is closed and has been since Sunday morning. They closed it anticipating the floods and last night it looked like it had flooded slightly. If the water rises more, it'll flood more.

Getting out of our village involves a lengthy to get round the roads closed for flooding.

I did have to leave work at lunch time yesterday as the road to the car-park where I had my car was being closed as it was under water.

Other than that, no problems as our house is on a small hill.


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 07-24-07 12:58 AM
horizontal rule
16

lengthy DETOUR to get round the road ... etc


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 07-24-07 12:58 AM
horizontal rule
17

16: I was convinced that was some piece of Scottish slang. "That was a lengthy, what?" "That is was, cunt."


Posted by: Sifu Tweety | Link to this comment | 07-24-07 1:05 AM
horizontal rule
18

Yeah, we're fine too - there was some flooding just along the road from me on Friday but it went when the rain stopped. Just crazy though. They reckoned the Thames was going to peak early this morning, so hopefully that's the worst of it now for Oxford and it won't get any worse further downstream where we are. Over to the west in Gloucestershire though - they're fucked, no electricity or water in some places, and it could take a week or two to get anywhere near back to normal.

That last picture on Chris Brooke's photos, Osney Island, is where I lived in '95/96 (it's a tiny island with three streets running parallel to the one in the picture, one across the top, one across the bottom - I lived in the middle street) - there are plaques a bit further along on the river bank showing the heights of previous floods. I guess there'll be a new one this year!


Posted by: asilon | Link to this comment | 07-24-07 2:00 AM
horizontal rule
19

The first floods, a couple of weeks ago, swamped a village near here which is still evacuated. And a kid was drowned in a park about ten minutes walk from our house.

The army moved a dozen or so families into our company's data centre the first night, because it had to be staffed. People worked a 26 hour shift.

We're fine. Our broadband was out this morning, and now it's running at about 16k, which may or may not be connected with the weather. And you know what? Who cares?


Posted by: OneFatEnglishman | Link to this comment | 07-24-07 2:38 AM
horizontal rule
20

Yesterday looks like it was the crisis day so far; the Royal Navy helicopters over Gloucester have now given place to the media camera ships, and the power station they were worrying about last night survived, although the water got to within 2 inches of the top of the wall. There's still quite a few people without water, though; there would have been many more if that station had gone under, as it drives a couple of waterworks...

(In the first lot of floods, a few weeks back, the big scare was a dam that looked like cracking and would have taken out a 400Kv supergrid link, a main railway line, and a motorway..one of the things about the UK is that there's really nowhere that isn't near something important.)


Posted by: Alex | Link to this comment | 07-24-07 3:40 AM
horizontal rule
21

I got into work this morning no problem. Some of the roads closed due to flooding yesterday have re-opened. The road out of our village is still shut, but I imagine it'll reopen tomorrow unless the water rises a lot. They are talking on the radio about the waters possibly still not reaching their peak around south Oxford and Abingdon, so it may still get worse. However, it looks like Oxfordshire isn't going to be that badly affected.


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 07-24-07 3:49 AM
horizontal rule
22

Over here in Cambridgeshire it's just lots of rain and general sogginess. The Cam is up a bit but nothing spectacular. And with any luck it'll stay that way.


Posted by: Nakku | Link to this comment | 07-24-07 4:24 AM
horizontal rule
23

Severn-Trent Water claim they've lined up millions of litres a day in bottled water and 90,000 trailers of the stuff. The army is apparently doing the distribution.

I've just heard some idiot BBC Radio journalist asking a water engineer why they put the waterworks near a river (*sobs*).

Mind you, I bet a lot of people want to punch the guy who decided to keep the mobile flood barriers 20 miles from town, so they got stuck in traffic on the M5..


Posted by: Alex | Link to this comment | 07-24-07 4:31 AM
horizontal rule
24

OK, that should be 900 trailers and "several" million litres of bottled water.


Posted by: Alex | Link to this comment | 07-24-07 5:34 AM
horizontal rule
25

London escaped for the moment. Even Richmond and Twickenham which flood at the slightest excuse. Halfway up Muswell Hill, we're relatively immune unless the stream underneath our house starts to act up; it runs through clay so it shouldn't.


Posted by: dave heasman | Link to this comment | 07-24-07 8:34 AM
horizontal rule
26

one of the things about the UK is that there's really nowhere that isn't near something important.

Except for Stevenage.


Posted by: ajay | Link to this comment | 07-24-07 8:44 AM
horizontal rule
27

one of the things about the UK is that there's really nowhere that isn't near something important.

Except Crickhowell, I believe.


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 07-24-07 8:51 AM
horizontal rule
28

one of the things about the UK is that there's really nowhere that isn't near something important.

HUDDERSFIELD


Posted by: OPINIONATED GRANDMA | Link to this comment | 07-24-07 8:52 AM
horizontal rule
29

About 2/3rds of Scotland is near nothing important. Apart from sheep, and midges.


Posted by: nattarGcM ttaM | Link to this comment | 07-24-07 8:59 AM
horizontal rule
30

Midges are only important to a few people, but those people derive a lot of importance hedons from them.

And agriculture, probably.


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 07-24-07 9:01 AM
horizontal rule
31

Stevenage? A1/East Coast Main Line/satellite industry? Surely not. Lots of telco stuff, too.

Huddersfield? There's the George Hotel, and the ICI chemical plant..


Posted by: Alex | Link to this comment | 07-24-07 9:12 AM
horizontal rule
32

So, how about Crickhowell? I think Powys in general may be the most dispensable part of Britain.


Posted by: Cryptic Ned | Link to this comment | 07-24-07 10:28 AM
horizontal rule
33

29: how dare you. Scotland is important, per se.


Posted by: ajay | Link to this comment | 07-24-07 11:15 AM
horizontal rule
34

Wrexham!
Colwyn Bay!

It's the bits of Scotland which are valuable to midges that refresh the soul.


Posted by: Nworb Werdna | Link to this comment | 07-24-07 1:23 PM
horizontal rule
35

Wrexham is near a lot of important industrial centres in Cheshire. Colwyn Bay has the main line from London to Holyhead and the Irish ports running right through it.


Posted by: dsquared | Link to this comment | 07-24-07 5:49 PM
horizontal rule